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Snake: Stripe-bellied Sand

Find, identify & discuss the marine species of SANParks
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DinkyBird
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Re: Snake: Stripe-bellied Sand

Unread postby DinkyBird » Tue Nov 18, 2014 1:08 pm

Filmed at our campsite next to the fence at Punda Maria camp:

[video]http://youtu.be/qnVuA_e6qbY[/video]
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Elsa
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Re: Snake: Stripe-bellied Sand

Unread postby Elsa » Wed Nov 19, 2014 2:39 pm

Incredible sighting DB and Hawk, and beautifully videoed. :clap:
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bondm
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Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread postby bondm » Wed Jan 21, 2015 2:05 pm

Hi,

Could you please ID this snake I saw in Letaba camp in November.

Image

It was about 1 metre in length.

Thanks

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BushSnake
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Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread postby BushSnake » Wed Jan 21, 2015 2:54 pm

It's a stripe-bellied sand snake / Gestreepte sandslang (Psammophis subtaeniatus) . They are very common in Kruger and certainly one of our fastest snakes!
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Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread postby bondm » Wed Jan 21, 2015 8:46 pm

Thanks very much for the ID Bushsnake.

I presume that they aren't poisonous.

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BushSnake
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Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread postby BushSnake » Wed Jan 21, 2015 9:43 pm

No... unless you happen to be a lizard :D . They do use venom to kill their prey, but the bite is generally regarded as harmless to humans. They are back fanged so venom delivery is slow, and even when humans get bitten, it is only those that allow the snake to really chew in venom (bite and hold on for more than a minute) that show any effects (some swelling).
"If you can only visit two continents in your lifetime, visit Africa.... TWICE" - R.Elliot


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