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Snake: Boomslang/Common African Tree-

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Mfezi
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Re: Boomslang

Unread postby Mfezi » Wed Feb 11, 2009 7:49 pm

Glad to see that you are OK and I hope that you will only get better and better every day :thumbs_up:

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Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread postby Pjw » Wed Mar 04, 2009 2:17 pm

Hi there
We saw these 2 snakes ? mating high up in a tree at our timeshare on the Crocodile river. We thought they were boomslang because of the large eyes. Unfortunately I could not get a photo of the head. All the photos are tkaen from underneath as they were about 2m up in the tree
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Any help with ID would appreciated
Thanks Pat
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Boorgatspook
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Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread postby Boorgatspook » Wed Mar 04, 2009 7:29 pm

Hi Pat, i'm no expert on snakes but i tend to agree with you that it's a boomslang. (Rather difficult to id from the photo's) A charateristic feature of the boomslang is their large eyes in proportion to the head as well as along with their keeled body scales.

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Mfezi
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Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread postby Mfezi » Sun Mar 08, 2009 7:12 pm

Hi PJW

I tend to agree with Boorgatspook that it is Boomslang. Very few snakes (except for most of the adders) have keeled scales and that will climb up so high up in a tree. Now I know the height that a snake is up in a tree is for sure no way to identify it. One thing is for sure that these snakes have keeled scales. From what I can see it also does look like their tails are much much longer and thinner than the usual snake. The little bit that I can see on the middle photo of the one snake's head also gives me the impression of Boomslang.

Anyway a great sighting and very well spotted. :thumbs_up:

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Re: Boomslang

Unread postby freespiritsafari » Mon Mar 16, 2009 9:35 pm

Hi Geoff,

I am very glad to hear that you will be ok!!

Can you please share with us the EXACT details on how the bite occurred?
Was it at night/day? etc etc!
Boomslang are not known to be aggressive snakes, so I would really appreciate to know how it happened...

thanks, and get well.

Kimberly

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Re: Geoff Lockwood bitten by a boomslang at Talamati

Unread postby anitagibbs » Tue Mar 17, 2009 12:08 am

Kimberly, did you check out the thread I linked to? On page 2 there's a copy of an email from someone who was with him when it happened, at 7.25 on a February morning, so presumably it was light.

The email begins "For those of you who don't know, Geoff Lockwood was bitten by what he thought was the resident Boomslang at around 07h25 on Sunday morning in Talamati. I was outside my bungalow (no. 2) with him, when he stepped into the grass to take a photo of the Barred Owl chick, and it struck."
Anita

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Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread postby francoisd » Wed Apr 29, 2009 4:26 pm

Can someone help with ID of this snake. Seen in bush next to road, 2km north of Satara in Kruger

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Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread postby BushSnake » Wed Apr 29, 2009 5:52 pm

Yip. That's a nice boomslang (most likely a male as females are normally brown, but not always).
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Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread postby josey » Tue Aug 18, 2009 9:03 am

Please help with an ID for this snake. It was in Gardenia Hide near Berg n Dal in the Kruger Park in July.

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regards
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Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread postby BushSnake » Tue Aug 18, 2009 9:33 am

This is not the harmless version of the snake family :shock: . It is definitely a boomslang / Dispholidus typus and they can be differentiated from the harmless green snakes by the shape of the head and the eye. The green snakes (green water snake, natal green snake, spotted bush snake etc.) have a slightly more elongated head, and both the bushsnake and the natal green snake have orange irises, making the eye very unique and easy to seperate from the boomslang's eye. This is most likely a male, as the females are normally (not always) brownish.
Last edited by BushSnake on Tue Aug 18, 2009 9:36 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread postby Boorgatspook » Tue Aug 18, 2009 9:34 am

I'll go with Boomslang. The big eyes the give away.

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Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread postby big5spotter » Tue Aug 18, 2009 10:10 am

Venom

"Many members of the family Colubridae that are considered venomous are essentially harmless to humans, because they either have small venom glands, relatively weak venom, or an inefficient system for delivery of venom. However, the boomslang is a notable exception in that it has a highly potent venom, which it delivers through large fangs that are located in the rear of the jaw.[1] The venom of the boomslang is primarily a hemotoxin. It disables the blood clotting process and the victim may well die as a result of internal and external bleeding.[1][4] Other signs and symptoms include: headache, nausea, sleepiness and mental disorders. Because the venom is slow to act, symptoms may not be manifest until many hours after the bite."
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Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread postby flying cheetah » Wed Aug 26, 2009 8:54 am

Saw this road kill in KNP near Bateleurs camp :(
Could it be a female Boomslang?

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Last edited by flying cheetah on Fri Aug 28, 2009 8:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread postby BushSnake » Wed Aug 26, 2009 9:11 am

Yes that is a female boomslang.
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Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread postby flying cheetah » Thu Sep 03, 2009 9:40 am

Hi,
this pic wasn´t taken at sanparks and I put it in here because I think that´s my best chance to find out what kind of snake it is.
These snakes were living in a hole in the ground under a shrub. This was in our bush camp in the Masai Mara. In the sunny hours the snakes came out to hang around in the shrub and seemed to be very relaxed if you came close to them. The staff of the camp said they are harmless (some kind of grass snake..), but I´m not to shure about that :hmz:
Could anybody of the experts please help me?

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