Skip to content

SANParks.org Forums

View unanswered posts | View active topics






Post new topic Reply to topic  Page 3 of 3
 [ 37 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3
Author Message
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Apr 25, 2005 1:56 pm 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Apr 02, 2005 8:29 am
Posts: 939
Location: Stuck in Gauteng
Oh, definitely Elana. The brown variety is more common but the black widow is still all over. In Gauteng I've always seem to find them in dusty garages.

_________________
Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.
Albert Einstein

Latest lifers from Kruger NP:
Black Coucal Centropus grillii Swartvleiloerie
Flappet Lark Mirafra rufocinnamomea Laeveldklappertjie


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Apr 25, 2005 1:57 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 29, 2005 6:29 pm
Posts: 212
Location: Trying to get back on earth
Thanks for those quick answers even if I would have prefered a "no you don't find them in SA" !
:?
Does someone have a list of dangerous spiders in SA ?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Apr 25, 2005 1:58 pm 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 29, 2005 12:52 pm
Posts: 1738
Location: My business...
We do have a kind of Black Widow but contrary to belief they rarely cause death - only with elderly and children. The bite is extremely painful but treatable. The ones to be scared of in SA is the Violin Spider and the Crab Spider (not sure about the name?).


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Apr 25, 2005 2:00 pm 
Offline
Honorary Virtual Ranger
Honorary Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 14, 2005 5:42 pm
Posts: 17943
Location: Red sand, why do I keep thinking of red sand?
Bert's link wrote:
Two species are common to the United States.

That set me to thinking that there might be a different one in SA of course, and it is:

Quote:
Background: Widow spiders belong to the genus Latrodectus and include the black widow spider (Latrodectus mactans mactans) in the United States. The term widow spider is used because not all species in the genus Latrodectus are black. Other widow spiders in North America include the brown widow (Latrodectus geometricus), the red-legged widow (Latrodectus bishopi), Latrodectus variolus, and Latrodectus hesperus. The redback spider (Latrodectus hasselti) is endemic to Australia. Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus and Latrodectus pallidus are found in Europe and South America, and the button spider (Latrodectus indistinctus) is found in South Africa.

The adult female black widow spider is approximately 2 cm in length and shiny black with a red-orange hourglass or spot on the ventral abdomen. The male is much smaller, brown, and incapable of envenomating humans. Juvenile females are also brown but have the general body morphology of the adult. Males and juveniles have a pale hourglass shape, similar to adult females. The female sometimes eats the male during or after copulation. Webs are irregular, low-lying, and commonly seen in garages, barns, outhouses, and foliage. Other widow spiders are generally black but may have red spots, such as Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus, or a dorsal red stripe, such as the redback spider. Latrodectus geometricus is brown with red and yellow markings.

Pathophysiology: Alpha-latrotoxin causes the toxic effects observed in humans by opening cation channels (including calcium channels) presynaptically, causing increased release of multiple neurotransmitters. This results in excess stimulation of motor endplates with resultant clinical manifestations. Clinically, the predominant effects are neurological and autonomic, in contrast to the dermonecrotic local effects associated with spiders causing necrotic arachnidism (eg, brown spiders [Loxosceles species]).

Frequency:

In the US: Approximately 2500 widow spider bites were reported to the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) in 2001, although this figure is probably conservative because of underreporting.

Mortality/Morbidity: In the United States, an average of 4 deaths per year are reported to occur as a result of spider bites. However, no deaths caused by widow spider envenomation have been reported to the AAPCC since its first annual report in 1983. A recent death was reported after a black widow spider bite in Greece.

_________________
Arriving currently: The photos from our trip! Overhere! :yaya:

Feel free to use any of these additional letters to correct the spelling of words found in the above post: a-e-t-n-d-i-o-s-m-l-u-y-h-c


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Apr 25, 2005 2:05 pm 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 29, 2005 12:52 pm
Posts: 1738
Location: My business...
Just got this from Vincent Carruthers' Wildlife of Southern Africa:

Black Widows: Neuro-toxin causes severe pain at the site of the bite, muscle disfunction, heart palpitations, stomach ache, difficult breathing, nausea and severe anxiety. If untreated it may lead to death, but it's rare. Get immediate medical aid. Others like the brown one isn't as poisonous.

This is originally in Afrikaans, I hope I got the quick translation right.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue May 10, 2005 11:20 am 
Offline
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 1:38 pm
Posts: 1935
As to the photo of a spider I posted on page 1 of this thread:

Yesterday (09/05) I discovered the website of the Spider Club of South Africa and emailed the photo to them. I have just received an answer from them. I thought it good to share it with those who took time in trying to identify it. Below reply from Astri Leroy

Quote:
Hello Francois,
Wow! What a beautiful baboon spider! Most baboon spiders are rather dull-coloured but you have photographed one of our more spectacular ones, Harpactira chrysogaster (red-rumped baboon spider) which has this lovely reddish brown abdomen & silvery hairs on the appendages. The record of its distribution is Stellenbosh, so that makes sense.

I think it may be either a juvenile or a male. It looks quite small against the grass, did you record measurements or even estimate. You measure a spider from the front of the carapace (head) to end of abdomen LEAVING OUT THE LEGS.

If you are really interested in spiders please visit out website, www.spiders.co.za easy isn’t it?

Kind regards


Astri Leroy
THE SPIDER CLUB OF SOUTHERN AFRICA
PO BOX 1126
RANDBURG
2125 SOUTH AFRICA
Phone: +27 (011) 958-0695 Fax: +27 (011) 958-0697
Mobile +27 073-168-7187

_________________
"The measure of life is not its duration but its donation." - Peter Marshall
www.flickr.com/groups/birdssa


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sun Mar 19, 2006 5:50 pm 
Offline
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 8:09 am
Posts: 790
Location: gauteng
The plague of crickets in 2003/2004 were armoured crickets not quite as revolting as the Joburg Parktown Prawn.If we ever get them in this house were we live now we will definately MOVE!! There seems to be more Red Romans around in the park..I really don`t want to see any in April!


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 37 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group

Webcams Highlights

Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Submitted by teddy_rsa at 16:05:06 Submitted by haileyidaho at 21:59:21 Submitted by JanPrrr at 21:16:38 Submitted by Ton&Herma at 13:37:01