Skip to content

SANParks.org Forums

View unanswered posts | View active topics






Post new topic Reply to topic  Page 2 of 6
 [ 84 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 31, 2005 11:36 am 
Offline
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 1:38 pm
Posts: 1935
If there were more water (without the silt) running on a regular basis from the SA side to Moz it might not have been necessary for them to enlarge the holding capacity of the dam to ensure that they have enough water in storage for dry periods (as are experienced at this stage)

_________________
"The measure of life is not its duration but its donation." - Peter Marshall
www.flickr.com/groups/birdssa


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 31, 2005 11:38 am 
Offline
Honorary Virtual Ranger
Honorary Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 14, 2005 5:42 pm
Posts: 17943
Location: Red sand, why do I keep thinking of red sand?
Just checked it, looks good there now:
Image

_________________
Arriving currently: The photos from our trip! Overhere! :yaya:

Feel free to use any of these additional letters to correct the spelling of words found in the above post: a-e-t-n-d-i-o-s-m-l-u-y-h-c


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 31, 2005 11:42 am 
Offline
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
User avatar
Award: Birder of the Year (2013)
Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2004 10:27 am
Posts: 5312
Location: Chasing down the rarities
francoisd wrote:
wildtuinman wrote:
I wonder how the Mazzinger will work with the current stuff ups in SA?

Now you are starting to catch my drift dear Sir. If there were more water (without the silt) running on a regular basis from the SA side to Moz it might not have been necessary for them to enlarge the holding capasity of the dam to ensure that they have enough water in storage for dry periods (as are experienced at this stage)
*Francois wondering if he still needs to keep helmet on :lol: *


The drift is slow because of the low level of water you know. Only arrived here now. :lol:

No I agree, SA is very much part of this problem. We take and make of the water like we feel. We are one of the richest water countries with the highest rainfalls of all other places. :roll: :evil:

But who looses out in the end? Kruger National Park and its inhabitants! :(

_________________
656
Latest Lifer(s): White-winged Flufftail, Dickinson's Kestrel, Senegal Coucal, Three-banded Courser, African Broadbill, Thrush Nightingale, Rufous-bellied Heron.

Follow me as I bird on Twitter @wildtuinman


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 02, 2005 7:12 am 
Offline
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
User avatar
Award: Birder of the Year (2013)
Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2004 10:27 am
Posts: 5312
Location: Chasing down the rarities
This is a huge problem.
I was in that area between the 12 and 14th of Aug and there was very little water to speak of.
I saw the news insert last night.
There is no water to speak off.
Hundreds of fish died as a result of hippo dung decomposing and using up the last bit of oxygen in the last couple of pools.

I see a hippo culling on its way.
Hundreds of hippos congregate in these last pools of water.

_________________
656
Latest Lifer(s): White-winged Flufftail, Dickinson's Kestrel, Senegal Coucal, Three-banded Courser, African Broadbill, Thrush Nightingale, Rufous-bellied Heron.

Follow me as I bird on Twitter @wildtuinman


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 02, 2005 7:34 am 
To give you an idea of how bad the situation is compare my photo, which was taken on 09 August 2002, with that of WTM.

Image

Image


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 02, 2005 9:03 am 
Offline
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2005 4:12 pm
Posts: 519
Location: what does spinning mean? :-|
and then I compare those to photos with my photos of the floods of 2000 and its unbelievable...... :shock: :shock: the water was lapping over the main bridge with huge trees banging into the bridge as they rushed downwards....


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Sep 06, 2005 9:15 am 
Offline
Honorary Virtual Ranger
Honorary Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 14, 2005 5:42 pm
Posts: 17943
Location: Red sand, why do I keep thinking of red sand?
Not looking that good.....
Image

_________________
Arriving currently: The photos from our trip! Overhere! :yaya:

Feel free to use any of these additional letters to correct the spelling of words found in the above post: a-e-t-n-d-i-o-s-m-l-u-y-h-c


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Sep 06, 2005 10:56 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2004 9:03 pm
Posts: 11
Location: Johannesburg
Just arrived back from a short trip to Kruger yesterday.
I only went as far north as Satara.
A notice was put up regarding the Olifants River situation.
Satara receives its water supply from the Olifants River, but since the river is no longer flowing, water is being pumped from 2 boreholes in the camp.
There are now water restrictions in the camp (no watering of gardens, and the closure of the car wash).

The park in general is still dry - dusty and windy.
Until Kruger receives the season's first showers, the vast burnt areas are not going to be a pretty sight.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Sep 12, 2005 10:57 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 04, 2005 3:04 pm
Posts: 537
Location: Nottinghamshire UK
It has been fascinating to visit KNP over the last several years and to see this cycle in action.
We first visited in 1988 which was at the end of a wet period.
I don't think I have ever seen the park quite like it was then again.

The following several years went through a really bad dry cycle, with many animals being lost to the drought.
I still don't particularly enjoy visiting in the winter -
I much prefer to see the Kruger alive, even if game viewing becomes more difficult.

This dry spell was probably longer than the 7-8 years - but ended at the end of the 1990s - in particular with the amazing events of summer 2000.

We do seem to be entering a dry period again, rather earlier than expected. But then again, weather is changing all over the world.
Who knows what effect that will have on the climate of South Africa; in the UK there are definitely changes very apparent now.

Richard


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Olifants river drying up
Unread postPosted: Tue Oct 04, 2005 10:48 am 
Offline
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
User avatar
Award: Birder of the Year (2013)
Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2004 10:27 am
Posts: 5312
Location: Chasing down the rarities
chrisb wrote:
I was this past weekend in the KNP and the Olifants river dried up. Only a few pools.
Why don't the KNP officials ask the mines in Phalaborwa to release water into the Selati river that flows into the Olifants.
I know for a fact that for years the mines released water into the Selati river and the Olifants kept on flowing.
Remember the drought of the 1990/91 the one mine pumped water stream up of the Olifantsdam into the Olifants to keep water availible for Phalaborwa.


Hi chrisb,

the problem is that the barage dam in Phalaborwa is almost filled to the top with silt. They barely have enough water for the town. There was some water released into the olifants recently, but as you saw it did not help much. The heat and thirst of the land used up most of it already. All we can hope for is rain, which I believe will come soon.

_________________
656
Latest Lifer(s): White-winged Flufftail, Dickinson's Kestrel, Senegal Coucal, Three-banded Courser, African Broadbill, Thrush Nightingale, Rufous-bellied Heron.

Follow me as I bird on Twitter @wildtuinman


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Olifants river drying up
Unread postPosted: Tue Oct 04, 2005 11:57 am 
Offline
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
User avatar
Award: Birder of the Year (2013)
Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2004 10:27 am
Posts: 5312
Location: Chasing down the rarities
chrisb wrote:
Hi Wildtuinman

My question is still why can't the mines release water into the river.
In my 48 years staying in Phalaborwa this is the first time the Olifants stopped flowing.
The mines released water into the river until last year June.
There was always water flowing into the river.


Chrisb, that is a good question, but my guess would be that the mines' water contains silt too which damages the Eco-system down the line.
Who knows what other harmful chemicals are being released with it?
You say that the mines always provided water. It is great to hear from someone there in Phalaborwa self, who can provide us with clues.
Can you maybe try and find out for us then?

I don't know 100% how the system works there, but it seems like the only option to provide water to Kruger right now is from the barrage dam.
It did sound like water from the Blydepoort dam might help filling the Olifants.
Has the tender been awarded yet for clearing the barrage's silt?

Which ever way, man are stuffing up nature.
Now with the planned Mazinger dam I reckon it will only stuff it up more.
But many others disagree with me.

_________________
656
Latest Lifer(s): White-winged Flufftail, Dickinson's Kestrel, Senegal Coucal, Three-banded Courser, African Broadbill, Thrush Nightingale, Rufous-bellied Heron.

Follow me as I bird on Twitter @wildtuinman


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Olifants river drying up
Unread postPosted: Tue Oct 04, 2005 12:09 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Feb 24, 2005 1:18 pm
Posts: 6
Location: Phalaborwa, Limpopo Province
I am working at one of the mines and don't want to get involved in any discussions about the releasing of water into the river.
It is a very sensitive case and i am not allowed to speak on behalf of the mine.
DWAF stopped the releasing of water.
The water does not contain any silt, it is clear.
The water was flowing for years into the river.

I don't think they can clear up the silt in the barrage the problem is too big.
We are getting water from the dam in the Blyderiver higher up in the mountain now for years.

Can somebody from the park give us an answer.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Oct 04, 2005 2:24 pm 
Offline
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
User avatar
Award: Birder of the Year (2013)
Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2004 10:27 am
Posts: 5312
Location: Chasing down the rarities
KNP Spokesman wrote:
Dear Forumites

Thank you for your concerns about this issue.
I have asked WTM to place this for me as I am again plagued with internet connection problems.

The problem regarding the Olifants River flowing is pretty sensitive at the moment.
Many different organisations are involved but let us first look at the Act of Government that controls this - the relatively new National Water Act.
This basically says that those upstream of a river are responsible to those downstream of that same river to ensure that they get both quality and quantity of water.
An overriding factor is, of course, human consumption (people must have water).
In other words, those upstream of the Olifants are responsible for the water (both quality and quantity) that eventually flows into the KNP.

That said, we have impressed upon two of the key players of the Olifants Catchment Area (Department of Water Affairs and Forestry - DWAF and Lepelle Northern Water - the water supplier of the Phalaborwa Municipality) to ensure that water does indeed flow into the Kruger National Park.
DWAF controls the Blyde Poort Dam and Lepelle Northern Water controls the barrage.
I understand that more water has been released into the system after our request but we believe that these two organisations shouldn't have let the situation develop in the first place (if you take the new National Water Act into consideration).

We are monitoring the situation closely and have put in place severe water restrictions at all camps in this area in order to manage the river's flow from our side.
We are also in communication with both DWAF and Lepelle Northern Water.

Kind regards
KNP Spokesman

_________________
656
Latest Lifer(s): White-winged Flufftail, Dickinson's Kestrel, Senegal Coucal, Three-banded Courser, African Broadbill, Thrush Nightingale, Rufous-bellied Heron.

Follow me as I bird on Twitter @wildtuinman


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2005 6:53 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2004 5:54 pm
Posts: 43030
Location: Somerset West, Cape Town
Katydownunder's sms received early this morning:

Quote:
Saw something great this morning. Yesterday Olifants River was completely dry except for some remaining pools. Getting up this morning I could not believe my eyes. Water in the river and it even flows.

Now leaving Olifants rest camp we finally got a real river view :lol: Looks awsome. Katy


The Olifants River stopped flowing during the second half of August this year. Satara camp also relied on this river for its water and both Satara and Olifants camps have been using borehole water according to notices that were up in the camps.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2005 11:07 am 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 27, 2005 1:13 pm
Posts: 717
Location: Midrand
This is great news!!! Good to hear there is running water in the Olifants again....

_________________
Jakes


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 84 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group

Webcams Highlights

Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Submitted by CarolynR at 20:51:44 Submitted by Stampajane at 20:58:14 Submitted by Trudie at 19:33:22 Submitted by Katinka at 20:32:07