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Unread postPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2006 1:37 pm 
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restio wrote:
I say true.

My dad had a bushbaby as a pet when he was a child. His mother eventually made him get rid of it for hygiene reasons - she was very houseproud, and objected to the "urine washing." :lol:

My mom also had a problem with her childhood pet, which was a duiker. It's nasty habit was eating my grandmother's roses. Sadly, my own childhood involved much more traditional pets!


nice pets there in SA...

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Unread postPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2006 1:52 pm 
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It is false.

Bushbabies urinate on their hands and feet, and although primarily for scent marking it also helps their grip. Kinda like when people lick their hands. Perhaps we could teach that to the SA cricket fielders?? :x

Uhm, I think you guys misread my post, because I think your answers were wrong, but your reasoning correct??

Next one:
Brown Hyena's live in communal dens, and have family structures similar to spotted Hyena's

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Unread postPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2006 2:35 pm 
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False: brown hyaena's are solitary animals! They only come together to mate.

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Unread postPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2006 7:25 pm 
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Quote:
Brown Hyena's live in communal dens, and have family structures similar to spotted Hyena's


Nice one!!! :D
TRUE!

Lives in clans which includes sons and daughters. They only forage alone..


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Unread postPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2006 10:55 pm 
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im new to this..but i must say loam brilliant idea!!
do you sit up the whole night just thinking of ways to entertain us because if you are its really paying off

and my answer is true. brown hyenas do live in family structures like spotted hyenas only theirs are smaller and consist out of fewer members

WAS I RIGHT?

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Unread postPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:13 pm 
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True

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Unread postPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 9:04 am 
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I am going to say false. Usually only one female breeds but with the Spotted hyaena all females breed

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Unread postPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 1:59 pm 
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Jock, close, but I am afraid I said "similar" family structures and not "exact same" ;-)

Answer is true.

Mark and Delia Owens found this out when they were studying them in Deception Valley in the Kalahari. Cry the Kalahari is a worthwile read ;-)

kaka_sparrow, at the moment nothing keeps me awake at night, these are just facts that I pick up along the way while I read and watch documentaries ;-)

Next one:
One of the biggest Wildebeest migrations happen in Botswana

Answer on Monday ;-)

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Unread postPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 2:19 pm 
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replace "wildebeest" by "zebra" and it's TRUE. So I say FALSE!

I know of two big wildebeest migrations: One is of course in Serengeti Mara and the other is somewhere around the Zambia-Angola frontier.

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Unread postPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 7:18 pm 
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Thanks for all the fun questions, Loams! I've also read "Cry of the Kalahari" and it was fascinating.

There is a heart-rending story in "Cry of the Kalahari" on the impact of fences on animal migration. If memory serves me correctly, wildebeest were involved.

So I say true to the wildebeest migration in Botswana.


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Unread postPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:45 pm 
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false. iv never heard of a big wildebeest herd in botswana so id say false definitley

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Unread postPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:59 pm 
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True - Linyanti marshes-Savuti- Mababe Depression.

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Unread postPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2006 8:26 am 
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Ah, playing with words hay Loams, you got me hook line and sinker.

Well this one is a guess, I would say false

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Unread postPosted: Mon Aug 07, 2006 1:32 pm 
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Tsk, Tsk

The answer is true. The second biggest Wildebeest migration in the world is in Botswana. Of course there are some zebra involved as well. Unfortunately, the Botswana (Or English colonisers??) government put up cattle fences all over, and hundreds of thousands of migrating Wildebeest and Zebra die at the fence, as it is placed smack bag in their path.

Something you need to know about Botswana, is that it's a tad wilder than SA. It is not uncommon for people to drive past Elephants, Lion, Zebra etc etc on our main roads. They have all been the cause of some serious car accidents at night.

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Unread postPosted: Mon Aug 07, 2006 8:25 pm 
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I have dug out my copy of "Cry of the Kalahari" by Mark & Delia Owens (ISBN 0-00-637030) and thought I'd quote some of the relevant sections. It is 1979 and the rains have failed.

Quote:
This was unlike the Serengeti migration, where herds of wildebeest often mass together in great numbers. Because they live in a marginal, semidesert habitat, the Kalahari population is more mobile and less concentrated to begin with; now it was moving in herds of from 40 to 400 antelope, scattered along a vast front measuring more than 100 miles from east to west.

Not all the herds headed in the same direction. One portion, probably more than 90,000 strong, had taken the route to the north [to Lake Xau, Lake Ngami, the Okavango]; tens of thousands of others began walking toward the Limpopo river 300 miles to the east.... Once underway, they spent little time feeding, for without moisture, they could not digest what they ate. Their aim was to get to water, and perhaps to better forage, as quickly as possible....

The herds covered about 25 or 30 miles each night. From the air the dusty migratory trails looked like gnarled fingers reaching for the lakes and rivers.... The desert was taking its toll of the very young and the old; they were left behind for the scavengers. The physical condition of each animal was pitted against the great distances that had to be traveled, with little to eat and nothing to drink, but evolution had prepared them for the trek, and the strong should survive.

Suddenly, the wildebeest stopped short.... Stretched across their path were strands of high-tensile steel wire - the Kuki foot-and-mouth-disease control fence....

The wildebeest were cut off from the emergency water and riverine habitat that for eons they had counted upon in times of drought. Nothing they had ever learned, none of their instincts could help them deal with this obstacle.

As they plodded along the fence, they encountered many other herds, part of the same migration headed for the lakeshores and riverbanks. Each day they were joined by giraffe, gemsbok and hartebeest, all needing water but trapped by the wire and the posts.

....Animals began to drop from hunger, thirst and fatigue. A giraffe who could have easily stepped over the wire became tangled in it. He struggled to get free, but the coils of high-tensile steel sliced deep into his flesh until he pitched forward, breaking his foreleg at the knee. His hind legs still ensnared, he pawed at the ground for days, building small mounds of sand around him as he tried to rise again. He never did.


This is a heart-rending :cry: story of how well-meaning intervention (fences to stop foot-and-mouth) had catastrophic unintended consequences. To me, this underscores the importance of realising that we are all part of the same natural system, and that the balance is finely tuned. We meddle at our peril.


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