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BEGINNERS' STARGAZING QUIZ (QM)

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Siobain
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Re: BEGINNERS' STARGAZING QUIZ (QM)

Unread postby Siobain » Thu Oct 10, 2013 12:33 pm

This is a complete guess,

1. If it is a big city like Johannesburg I would say about 60-100 stars.
2. If in Kruger with no trees or buildings blocking your view, then I would say several thousand, about 8000-10 000.
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Re: BEGINNERS' STARGAZING QUIZ (QM)

Unread postby Philip1 » Fri Oct 11, 2013 9:45 am

2) If you had perfect eyesight and traveled to completely dark skies, and there was no Moon, you might be able to get to count up almost 9,000 stars.
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Re: BEGINNERS' STARGAZING QUIZ (QM)

Unread postby onewithnature » Wed Jan 22, 2014 2:03 am

onewithnature wrote:Next Q for our budding astronomers ...

How many stars (more or less) can a person with good vision see with the naked eye if she or he
(i) is in a large city;
(ii) is in the country away from all forms of pollution on a moonless night;
(iii) is on top of a high mountain?


The answers may surprise you:

(i) One can usually not see more than about a couple hundred stars in a large, luminous city. In some very smoggy ones, you'd be lucky to see 10. :cry:
(ii) Assuming good eyesight without any defects, it is estimated that around 5000-6000 stars can be seen out in the country away from all forms of pollution.
(iii) On top of a high mountain, it is estimated that one could see 8000-10000 stars.


Thanks for your answers, Philip, Siobain, and Timepilot. :clap: :clap:
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Re: BEGINNERS' STARGAZING QUIZ (QM)

Unread postby onewithnature » Wed Jan 22, 2014 2:16 am

Right, let's surprise you even more. (I LOVE surprises!)

(i) How many stars do you think we could see if we were in Space, say a few thousand kilometres from Earth?

(ii) How many stars are there in our own Milky Way Galaxy?
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Re: BEGINNERS' STARGAZING QUIZ (QM)

Unread postby Timepilot » Wed Jan 22, 2014 4:44 am

i) Interesting, I would hazard a guess that it is at least 20,000 given that you should now be able to see more of the sky.

ii) 300 billion if I recall correctly.
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Re: BEGINNERS' STARGAZING QUIZ (QM)

Unread postby Phokojwe » Wed Jan 22, 2014 4:09 pm

:hmz: Good question OWN

(i) I would say approximately 15 million.
(ii) An estimated 400 billion
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Re: BEGINNERS' STARGAZING QUIZ (QM)

Unread postby onewithnature » Fri Jan 24, 2014 12:55 am

Anyone else?
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Re: BEGINNERS' STARGAZING QUIZ (QM)

Unread postby onewithnature » Tue Feb 18, 2014 8:43 am

:whistle:
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TR: A NEW DAY IS S-OWN
TR: NECTAREAN NICETIES OF THE NORTH
TR: PRIMEVAL PLEASURE

"Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read." (Groucho Marx)

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Re: BEGINNERS' STARGAZING QUIZ (QM)

Unread postby Phokojwe » Thu Feb 20, 2014 11:44 am

:think: :wall:
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Re: BEGINNERS' STARGAZING QUIZ (QM)

Unread postby onewithnature » Fri Feb 21, 2014 1:36 am

I'll give the answer tomorrow ...
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Re: BEGINNERS' STARGAZING QUIZ (QM)

Unread postby onewithnature » Sat Feb 22, 2014 2:02 am

TP, spot on with the first one. :clap: :clap: PK, when I was growing up, I also imagined seeing so many stars in Space that I wondered how you could see where you were going. I even thought it could be like daylight. Of course, the strange reality is that we see not more than about 20000 to 30000 stars when we're beyond the Earth's atmosphere, mainly because of the limitations of the human eye. In Space, then, you'd see about twice the equivalent of what you'd see on a high mountain top on Earth on a clear, non-polluted night; as TP pointed out, the difference between Earth and Space (if you're a few thousand kilometres from Earth) is that you have the horizon to block half of your view on Earth, whereas one would see 360 degrees in Space.

As to the number of stars in our Milky Way galaxy, there is ongong debate on this subject and wide variation: anywhere from a conservative estimate of 100 billion stars to a much more liberal 400 billion stars. The most common estimates seem to be about 300 billion, so well done to both of you. :clap: Of course, three-hundred thousand million suns is nothing to sneeze at; certainly a number that no-one has any idea how to rationalise or imagine.
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TR: A NEW DAY IS S-OWN
TR: NECTAREAN NICETIES OF THE NORTH
TR: PRIMEVAL PLEASURE

"Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read." (Groucho Marx)

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Re: BEGINNERS' STARGAZING QUIZ (QM)

Unread postby onewithnature » Sat Feb 22, 2014 2:05 am

Let's move on ...

What is the most famous, and possibly the only, nebula that one can see with the naked eye from Earth? Also, where is it situated and how visible is it (qualitatively speaking)?)
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Re: BEGINNERS' STARGAZING QUIZ (QM)

Unread postby Timepilot » Mon Feb 24, 2014 7:54 am

I would go with the Orion nebula (M42) which is situated just below Orion's belt as the middle "star" in Orion's sword.

This is actually quite visible and appears as a sort of fuzzy star. Even with a pair of bino's or a small telescope one can see it as a nebula.
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Re: BEGINNERS' STARGAZING QUIZ (QM)

Unread postby Phokojwe » Tue Feb 25, 2014 2:28 pm

I agree with Timepilot :thumbs_up:
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Re: BEGINNERS' STARGAZING QUIZ (QM)

Unread postby onewithnature » Sun Mar 02, 2014 8:31 am

Yes, well done TP. :clap: :clap: The only nebula truly visible to the naked eye, it is visible in most localities on Earth, even with a fair degree of light pollution around. TP, I'm not sure if one can recognise it as a nebula through binocs or a small telescope (my bank balance is too low at the moment to afford a good one), but the fuzziness is certainly obvious.
EVERYBODY'S TR!
TR: A NEW DAY IS S-OWN
TR: NECTAREAN NICETIES OF THE NORTH
TR: PRIMEVAL PLEASURE

"Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read." (Groucho Marx)


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