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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 2:20 pm 
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Virtual Ranger
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Hi Furahini :D

As Timepilot has said the distances that vultures fly from one place to
another can be very far.

You say in your question that you see them flying far in the sky, I think
you also want to know how high they can fly, so I can add a little to that.

Vultures can fly higher than any other birds, sometimes up to 11000 meters
if they are assisted by thermals, (which are pockets of warm air that rise
from the ground and are shaped by objects like mountains, dense vegetation
etc.)
These thermals help them to glide.

They are able to do this because they have air sacks as well as lungs, so the
blood stays full of oxygen and the bird may continue to breath easily at such
a height.

Another reason they like to fly so high is that they have very good eyesight
so the higher they fly, the further the distance they can see when looking
for food.


I hope this is what you were looking for.

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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 7:35 pm 
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Location: Selous Game Reserve - Tanzania
Hi Formites,
I am Oscar from guides of selous, thanks for your answers of my past questions.My question for today is,
How do noctunal migrants birds differ from diunal migrants birds?
Thanks.


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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 7:58 pm 
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How do noctunal migrants birds differ from diunal migrants birds?

Day flying birds take advantage of wind currents by soaring and gliding, as the sun’s rays heat the earth.
The night flying birds travel through the air by flapping their wings.


8)

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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 9:12 pm 
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Junior Virtual Ranger
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CuriousCanadian wrote:
The night flying birds travel through the air by flapping their wings.


Very clever answer, CC. :lol: :lol: :lol:

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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 10:02 pm 
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:roll: versus soaring along on the wind..... :roll:

:tongue:

:lol:

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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 10:26 pm 
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As Curious Canadian has said, most wind soarers are diurnal migrators
and wing flappers are nocturnal migrators.
:D :thumbs_up:

Birds are all different in size and basic body structure. If a bird
migrates by day or night depends on it's body type and anatomy.

Birds with wings that are suited to catching thermals tend
to migrate during the day, their food source is usually more available
for them., There are many birds that are diurnal migrators, some being
swallows and swifts.

For nocturnal migrants it is cooler at night especially when they migrate
through very hot areas like deserts, there is usually less wind
and they tend to be flapping flyers, less wind also saves energy.
There are less raptors flying about, so it is a little safer, they can
also rest and find food and water during the day. Songbirds, many bee-eaters,
kingfisher etc. tend to be nocturnal migrators.

Birds migrate in different ways depending on the circumstances, if it is
very cold they will fly at lower levels, in very hot conditions they will fly
much higher where the air is cooler.

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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Fri Oct 16, 2009 7:12 pm 
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Location: Selous Game Reserve - Tanzania
Jambo,,,!
Its nice time for me to ask another question about TERRAPINS.
For how long do terrapins stay IN & OUT of water?
Erick


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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Sat Oct 17, 2009 5:17 pm 
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Location: Tanzania, Selous Game Reserve
Guides of Selous wrote:
Jambo,,,!
Its nice time for me to ask another question about TERRAPINS.
For how long do terrapins stay IN & OUT of water?
Erick


Erick you need to specify your question.
What is it that you want to know?

You explained to me you saw a terrapin out of the water crossing a road, going away from the water source he was in.

A more specific question would be: What is the reason for them to move away from water (or are they going to another water source?!)?
Another question might be: How long can they survive away from the water (especially in dry season)?

Asante,
Jaap

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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Sat Oct 17, 2009 6:20 pm 
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Hi Erick, nice to talk to you. :D

I don't know all that much about this subject but I will share what I do.

Terrapins will stay in water most of the time, they move onto rocks and
banks usually to sun themselves. They tend to move around mostly in the
wet season where they will inhabit temporary or permanent water sources.

When water starts drying up, they usually bury themselves in the mud and
aestivate, which is to hibernate, so their system shuts down and they wait
for more rain, then will once again start to move about.

The females often leave the water to lay eggs and there is always the stray
one that may wander off a bit too far and get lost, so it ends up further from
it's water source. If a terrapin gets lost and ends up really far from water I
would think it is at great risk and would not last long in the heat of the sun,
or it may fall prey to predators.

Perhaps someone else can add to this.

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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Sat Oct 17, 2009 6:39 pm 
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Location: Selous Game Reserve - Tanzania
Hallo forumites,
Thank you iNkwazi, Curious Canadian and Siobain for your answers on my question!
I found all answers after getting back from a whole day safari, which was very interesting.
We encountered wild dogs resting in the shade! 4 in total. It was nice to see them because we dont see them to offten and the guests are always pleased to see them!
We were the only vehicle at the sighting, that is the best!

Hope you had a nice day to ? :tongue: :mrgreen:
Have a good weekend!
Many thanks,
Oscar


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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Sat Oct 17, 2009 6:50 pm 
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Location: Selous Game Reserve - Tanzania
Hallow
my name is Daimon, I was born in Bagamoyo where is historical site, now I am a boatman guide. Today I went on safari one guest asked a question about a borases palm.
Why are there many palms (borases palms) along the river?
Thanks a lot
Daimon


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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Sat Oct 17, 2009 8:19 pm 
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Hi Oscar and Daimon, :D

I'm glad the information could be of help to you.
:thumbs_up:

Oscar, you mentioned you don't often get to see wild dog, which predators
do you most often see?

And

Daimon, have you ever had any problems with hippos or crocodiles whilst
out on your boat?

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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Sat Oct 17, 2009 8:33 pm 
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Daimon,... the Borassus or Palmyra palm is highly adaptable and will succeed
in most types of soil, it does very well in dry savannah and near water sources.

Once the seedling starts to grow it produces a very long taproot to anchor the
plant deep in the ground. The seeds are also a favourite of elephants,
so I'm sure they help to spread the seeds around and is one of the reasons
they are plentiful.

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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Sat Oct 17, 2009 8:41 pm 
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Jambo Daimon

Borassus is one of the commoner palms of tropical Africa, and only just makes it across the border into South Africa. But I take it you want to know why you're seeing it on the river bank and not elsewhere? That's a difficult one, as only one of the two sites I know for this palm is at a river bank. There is a story that Borassus was brought to South Africa because of its religious significance some centuries ago, which makes me wonder: is there an ancient trade (slaves, maybe) route alonge your river? But the simple answer is I don't know either.

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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Mon Oct 19, 2009 1:16 am 
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Jambo Daimon

The Borassus (or Palmyra) palm does require a regular water source so even though they have long tap roots they will grow near a good source of water. As Siobain said the elephant like the fruit so would tend to spread the seeds - without good water and shade for the young plant it would not survive. Riverine bush would provide shade for the young plant and good water so they will grow.

They also grow along our river here in Perth, Australia, but you do see them growing in gardens if there is good water.

Kwaheri
Timepilot

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