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Guides of Selous

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Guides of Selous
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Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Guides of Selous » Mon Oct 12, 2009 7:26 pm

Habari Formites!

it is my hope that you are doing OK, am Whiteman, first of all let me take this Oppoturnite to thank you for all of your response we are really appreciate it and all in all thanks for "Kudu soil horning feed back"

my question is concerning "Leopard"
(1)-at what stage do a female leopard get separets from the cubs?
(2)-Is there any specific reason for them to be solitaly?

Asante sana,
WHITE.

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Elzet
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Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Elzet » Mon Oct 12, 2009 7:30 pm

Habari White, so nice to see you around again.

Interesting question, as sources on leopards vary from source to source.

As far as your question 1 is concerned: Female leopards reach sexual maturity at an average of 33 months. They may only give birth to cubs once every 2 years. The gestation period is around 96 days. 1 to 3 cubs are born. Cubs open their eyes after 10 days. They start hunting from the age of 5 to 10 months, and become independent after 13 - 18 months, although some sources also indicate the age of independence as 24 months.

Your question 2 - Their hunting style allows them to lead solitary lives without dependence on siblings or parents for reproductive success.

Take care!

Elzet
“Life is too short to wake up with regrets. So love the people who treat you right. Forget about those who don’t.” - Harvey MacKay

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Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Siobain » Mon Oct 12, 2009 9:54 pm

Hi White, good to have you back again. :D

The leopard is a typical cat, they are very secretive and can adapt very
well to their surroundings. They are mostly solitary, however, the male
does seem to be more so than the female. The ranges of females often
overlap and up to 3 females can share territory with 1 male. An adult
male and 3 females have been known to hunt along the same 5km stretch
of river.

The bond between a female and her cubs is very strong, and they
often meet up again after separating, and sometimes
continue to share kills. A radio-collared male was seen regularly
meeting up at night and hunting with his mother until he was 2½ years
old. The mother tolerated him until she had new cubs.
He is rich or poor according to what he is, not according to what he has. ~Henry Ward Beecher

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Elzet
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Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Elzet » Tue Oct 13, 2009 7:16 pm

Hi Siobain, good info! I wanted to add that, but out of the blue (pun intended) we experienced a powerful thunderstorm and we had to shut down all electrical equipment. In my opinion, the longer period mentioned in my initial post is far closer to the truth. :thumbs_up: In fact, information on Cheetah Outreach mentions that leopard cubs stay with their mothers for 18 to 24 months (average 22 months) and as Siobain has indicated, unlike cheetahs, females and offspring may continue to associate after separation.
Last edited by Elzet on Tue Oct 13, 2009 8:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Guides of Selous
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Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Guides of Selous » Tue Oct 13, 2009 8:18 pm

Hello Formites, how are you doing? here we are doing ok. I would like to give thanks to you for the questions you had answered me, about the long pod cacia and boabab flowers. Thanks very much. I am Mzee Haule one of the guides of selous. By this time, I will not cover on plants, but I would like to ask about baboons and wild dogs.

quez: Why do Baboons and Wild dogs eat an animal without killing? this is because most of carnivorous kill a prey then eat but I have not seen the baboons and wild dogs killing a prey.
best regards,
Mzee Haule

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jaapvandijk
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Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby jaapvandijk » Wed Oct 14, 2009 6:33 am

Have been in and out for a few days quickly.
Glad to see all the help we get!

@ Timepilot,
Ya I asked myself that question as well. Why do we try to find a reason for everything. Probably because there is a reason for it. Every action has a reason, in humans it will be consious or unconsious and might have a lot of different reasons (psychology will explain some). So then why not in animals?!?

@ Nurse Bev,
Sawubona means karibu (welcome)?
Asante!

@ Siobain,
Thanks for the answers. I'll try to let them type up a bit more on themselves.

@ hfglen,
Thanks for the info on baobabs! From now on we will be looking for them :) Easy to miss it seems! You havent told us how the guides in Limpopo Prov fool their visitors... Better you dont, they will surely take it over :mrgreen:
Thanks for your thought on flowering time of plants! That is something I did not think of but might well be true!
I think there are enthusiasts but time will be the limit? Whats you ideas on experiments?

@ Siobain and Elzet,
Thanks for the info on the leopards! So you are saying 24 months comes closer to the fact than 13-18 months. With an average of about 18 months right?
Elzet, a thunderstorm!! Koekemoer, wish it would come by here!!!
Getting warm here!

Kazi njema!
Watching the slow flow of the river. A continues movement of water down towards the ocean. Like blood flowing through a vein, keeping the body alive.

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Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Timepilot » Wed Oct 14, 2009 7:40 am

@ Timepilot,
Ya I asked myself that question as well. Why do we try to find a reason for everything. Probably because there is a reason for it. Every action has a reason, in humans it will be consious or unconsious and might have a lot of different reasons (psychology will explain some). So then why not in animals?!?


Jaap, I'm reading a book at the moment called "No Stopping for Lions" about a couple that travelled from CT through to Kenya and back south again. At one point they are sitting (I think in Zambia) watching some hippos. A couple of the hippos were in the still water pool above a rock slide type area, while another of the hippos was actually going into the rushing water, sliding down and then going around again for another go. The author made the comment that "according to the text book hippos like calm still water - this hippo obviously had'nt read the text book"!!

I guess the point is that sometimes we have to accept that they shake their head after drinking - and one will lick the water off :big_eyes: :wink:
“ Every year elephants were becoming scarcer and wilder south of the Zambezi, so that it had become impossible to make a living by hunting at all. ” FC Selous 1881

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jaapvandijk
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Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby jaapvandijk » Wed Oct 14, 2009 10:19 am

Timepilot wrote:...this hippo obviously had'nt read the text book" :rtm: :rtm: :rtm: !!

I guess the point is that sometimes we have to accept that they shake their head after drinking - and one will lick the water off :big_eyes: :wink:

:thumbs_up:
:mrgreen: :lol: :mrgreen:
We will have to accept this and ask ourselves in wonder why :huh:
Or just enjoy the sighting without questions.
Watching the slow flow of the river. A continues movement of water down towards the ocean. Like blood flowing through a vein, keeping the body alive.

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Guides of Selous
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Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Guides of Selous » Wed Oct 14, 2009 5:36 pm

Just getting the question forward again. Jaap's post made it get 'lost'... :tongue:

Guides of Selous wrote:Hello Formites, how are you doing? here we are doing ok. I would like to give thanks to you for the questions you had answered me, about the long pod cacia and boabab flowers. Thanks very much. I am Mzee Haule one of the guides of selous. By this time, I will not cover on plants, but I would like to ask about baboons and wild dogs.

quez: Why do Baboons and Wild dogs eat an animal without killing? this is because most of carnivorous kill a prey then eat but I have not seen the baboons and wild dogs killing a prey.
best regards,
Mzee Haule

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Siobain
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Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Siobain » Wed Oct 14, 2009 6:21 pm

:lol: :thumbs_up:
He is rich or poor according to what he is, not according to what he has. ~Henry Ward Beecher

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Guides of Selous
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Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Guides of Selous » Wed Oct 14, 2009 7:13 pm

Hie Formites

thanks for all your answers, we do appreciate for the job that you are doing. Asante sana (thanks alot) ,so far we have gain lot and we are exccepting to learn more.......!

Regards From,
Whiteman.

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Guides of Selous
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Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Guides of Selous » Wed Oct 14, 2009 8:01 pm

Hi Formites,
Nice to be here once again. Its my pleasure to ask the following question..
QUESTION
[color=#004000]How far does a vulture fly?[/color] (white backed vulture) this is because, sometime you might see them flying very far in the sky.
Ahsante for helping.
Furahini

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Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Siobain » Wed Oct 14, 2009 8:40 pm

Guides of Selous wrote:quez: Why do Baboons and Wild dogs eat an animal without killing? this is because most of carnivorous kill a prey then eat but I have not seen the baboons and wild dogs killing a prey.
best regards,
Mzee Haule


Hi Mzee, It is really nice to talk to you. Thanks for asking such an interesting question. :thumbs_up:

The way in which a Wild dog hunts is purely because of it's size. Predators like
lions and leopards are much stronger, so they find it easier to overpower and kill their
prey. This is not always the case though, because lions that kill larger prey, like a giraffe
or buffalo may take a long time to do so and then the pride also starts to feed of the
animal before it has died.

Wild dog mostly choose medium to smaller sized antelope and also the young of the
larger antelope, like the wildebeest. In most cases as soon as their prey is on the
ground, they start disemboweling it, which is opening the animal on the underside of
the body and pulling out the intestines, this results in a very quick death for the animal,
in most cases if a small antelope like the Thomson's gazelle, Impala or baby wildebeest
is caught the animal is usually almost completely eaten within 10 minutes, so it dies
very quickly.

I have never seen a Baboon catch and eat meat, but I have read it is quite common for
them to do so in Tanzania. They also eat the animal from the underside of the belly
where they would also then disembowel the animal killing it quickly......but someone
else may be able to add to this for you.

I hope this is of some help to you. :D
He is rich or poor according to what he is, not according to what he has. ~Henry Ward Beecher

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Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby hfglen » Wed Oct 14, 2009 9:09 pm

Hello Jaap

Time will indeed be the limit, or would be for most academics, simply because the experiment I thought of first involves months and months of nothing happening -- not the best way of racking up lots of publications each year! I'd bounce this idea off ecologists in the universities in Dar and Nairobi before committing resources to it, but think of keeping records of when various species seeds ripen relative to the rains each year (you'll need to run for 10 years or more to have a statistically valid sample, which tends to put most people off!). Then try planting a sample (say 50 seeds) each month in an otherwise-standard plot each month and see how many come up at all, how long it takes them, and how many survive for a year or 3. You'll probably need a tame and co-operative statistician (not me, I'm almost totally innumerate) advising on techniques.

Sterkte
Hugh
Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana. (Groucho Marx)

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Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Timepilot » Thu Oct 15, 2009 4:01 am

Jambo Mzee Haule and Furahini

Wild dog kills - I agree with Siobain - the method of killing is different with the wild dogs as they are coursers (chasers) and once the animal is brought down they all start to feed - while the animal is apparently still alive. However, I have read that researchers now believe that the wild dog actually kills faster than other carnivores because of this method.

Baboons - I have never seen a baboon eat an alive animal but have seen them eat a dead monkey - can't answer any more than that - sorry.

White backed vultures - I have read reports of white backed vultures which have been tagged flying from Kimberley to Hoedspruit which is a distance of about 800km's. I've also heard of Cape vultures flying about 1700km.
“ Every year elephants were becoming scarcer and wilder south of the Zambezi, so that it had become impossible to make a living by hunting at all. ” FC Selous 1881


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