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 Post subject: Re: Insect Quiz (RV)
Unread postPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2009 6:23 pm 
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Virtual Ranger
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Oh, Imberbe....where forth art thou?

Can one cricket be cool and one hot in the same climate? Or were you speaking figuratively?

Help, please.


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 Post subject: Re: Insect Quiz (RV)
Unread postPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2009 6:58 pm 
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:lol: Yes, it is a hypothetical situation to illustrate a basic fact.

Answer to follow soon ...
:whistle:

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 Post subject: Re: Insect Quiz (RV)
Unread postPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2009 10:34 pm 
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And here it is ....

The singing sex in crickets is the male. The female recognize the male of her species by his call. The songs of different species differ in frequency, rhythm and sound quality. A female will reject a male with the wrong song, preventing cross breeding!

But, since they are "cold blooded", the rhythm picks up as the environments temperature get warmer. In fact the rhythm of the garden cricket can be accurately converted, in chirps per minute, to give the temperature to within one degree centigrade. :shock:

The female compensates for this rise in temperature, to be able to identify the correct male.

Should you however keep them (artificially) at different temperatures, the female will be confused, and reject the male of her own species!

Africat ... you be IT!
:wink:

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 Post subject: Re: Insect Quiz (RV)
Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 9:10 am 
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Virtual Ranger
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Back to the cricket for a minute...while I was reading about them for Imberbe's question, I came across the calculation for converting chirps to temperature readings (The National Weather Service website here even has a Cricket Chirp Converter on it):

Because they are cold-blooded animals, crickets' metabolic rates are closely linked to the temperature of their surroundings. An interesting side-effect of this is that you can calculate air temperature based on the number of times a cricket chirps.

Cricket Chirps to Temperature

To convert cricket chirps to degrees Fahrenheit, count number of chirps in 14 seconds then add 40 to get temperature.

Example: 30 chirps + 40 = 70° F

To convert cricket chirps to degrees Celsius, count number of chirps in 25 seconds, divide by 3, then add 4 to get temperature.

Example: 48 chirps /(divided by) 3 + 4 = 20° C

I never knew that! Now,...let me think of a new question...hm-m-m.


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 Post subject: Re: Insect Quiz (RV)
Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 10:03 am 
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In 1990 an entomologist wrote a paper classifying and rating insect bites relative to the pain they produced, based on personal experience obtained by allowing them to bite him.

He described the top 2 most painful bites as follows:

* 4.0+_________ Blinding, fierce, shockingly electric. A running hair drier has been dropped into your bubble bath.
* 4.0+_________ Pure, intense, brilliant pain. Like fire-walking over flaming charcoal with a 3-inch rusty nail in your heel.

One of these is caused by the Bullet Ant, the other by an insect which is also found in South Africa.

What is the South African insect, which description above applies to it, and what is the name of the masochistic entomologist?


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 Post subject: Re: Insect Quiz (RV)
Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 11:51 am 
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A. Tarantula hawk wasp. Blinding, fierce, shockingly electric. A running hair drier has been dropped into your bubble bath.

B. Justin O. Smith

He must have also thrown a running hair drier in his bubble bath to make the comparison. :shock:

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 Post subject: Re: Insect Quiz (RV)
Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 2:16 pm 
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Yessiree, indeed..the last name spelling is different, but I suspect it's the same bloke:

The Schmidt Sting Pain Index or the Justin O. Schmidt Pain Index is a pain scale rating the relative pain caused by different Hymenopteran stings. It is mainly the work of Justin O. Schmidt, an entomologist at the Carl Hayden Bee Research Center. Schmidt has published a number of papers on the subject and claims to have been stung by the majority of stinging Hymenoptera.

His original paper in 1984 was an attempt to systematize and compare the hemolytic properties of insect venoms. The index contained in the paper started from 0 for stings that are completely ineffective against humans, progressed through 2, a familiar pain such as a common bee or wasp sting, and finished at 4 for the most painful stings.

Subsequently, Schmidt has refined his scale, culminating in a paper published in 1990 which classifies the stings of 78 species and 41 genera of Hymenoptera.

Spider hawk wasps it is, as they prey on species other than tarantulas as well.

Great, and SWIFT, job Siobane. Go for it!


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 Post subject: Re: Insect Quiz (RV)
Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 3:22 pm 
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Thanks Africat :thumbs_up:

Which insect and what tree form a short term, interdependent relationship
which ultimately ends up being detrimental to both in the long term?

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 Post subject: Re: Insect Quiz (RV)
Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 3:55 pm 
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My inner microbiologist is pointing me in the direction of ants, wasps, aphids or beetles, (also tsetse flies) that have a symbiotic relationship with the host tree, but deposit ultimately harmful bacterium. Should I continue in this direction, or point my needle elsewhere?


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 Post subject: Re: Insect Quiz (RV)
Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 9:40 pm 
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moving in the right direction Africat 8)

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 Post subject: Re: Insect Quiz (RV)
Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2009 2:10 pm 
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Hm-m-m-m-m...I can't seem to come up with an example of a South African species...any hints available?


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 Post subject: Re: Insect Quiz (RV)
Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 9:41 pm 
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The insects initially help the tree ward of herbivores.

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 Post subject: Re: Insect Quiz (RV)
Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 10:13 pm 
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I'm going with ants and acacias, but I can't get a bacteria connection there, just a hostile overtaking of the beneficial ants by another species of ants that are detrimental to the tree....but the browsers are driven off the tree by the "good" ants, so that part fits the profile.....anybody else???


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 Post subject: Re: Insect Quiz (RV)
Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 11:28 pm 
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Africat you are pretty close.

Scientists have discovered that elephants and other large browsing mammals are key to the Acacia's unique interdependent relationship with ants that live in its boughs. Trying to ward off the mammals, the Acacia's "hire" and support the ants as bodyguards -- but when the mammals disappear, the trees slash their support to the ants. As a result, parasitic insects, including a wood-boring beetle, begin to take over, hurting the trees.

I found this article in 'Science Daily' which i found very interesting.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 144845.htm

Well done, you are IT :thumbs_up:

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 Post subject: Re: Insect Quiz (RV)
Unread postPosted: Wed Jun 17, 2009 10:02 am 
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What phenomena is depicted in the photograph below, what family of insects causes this, and what mechanism, closely related to AIDS, plays a part in the success of the intended outcome?

Image


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