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 Post subject: Pafuri Camp
Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2005 1:26 pm 
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Sneak preview of the Pafuri camp.

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 Post subject: Pafuri Concession
Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 09, 2005 1:51 pm 
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Does any know the name of the Pafuri Concession ?
If you stop on the Luvuvhu bridge and look east you can just make the the Lodge on the banks of the river. It looks amazing and must have great bird sightings.
I would love to find out the prices and what it entails.


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Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 09, 2005 2:02 pm 
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Makuleke concession

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Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 09, 2005 2:37 pm 
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Jakkalsbessie wrote:
It is the Makuleke consession, and is run by Wilderness Safari's if i remember correctly.

As far as I know that is correct. It is also the new training ground for the Eco Training. Madach & SO will be there for the month of November.

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sat Sep 10, 2005 7:50 am 
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Krokodile wrote:
If this is called Pafuri Camp, what is "The Outpost"? A short distance into the KNP from Pafuri gate there is a sign showing this name. :?:


Pafuri camp is aimed at the traditional Kruger self-drive visitor whereas the Outpost is a luxurious bush lodge, also managed by Wilderness Safaris

all info are here

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Sep 12, 2005 9:37 am 
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Snoobab wrote:
I must say i'm kind of hooked on camping but this place is very tempting.
WTM is that shot taken from the bridge ?


No, the camp is way further down stream. You won't be able to see it from the Levuvhu bridge. towards Pafuri picnic spot you'll find a "hidden lookout from which you can see it."

Alternatively just go north over the bridge and turn right on the gravel road leading towards it. They were busy with some heavy duty machinery there in June 2005. So I could not slip in to have a proper look.

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 Post subject: Sunrise at Pafuri gate
Unread postPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2005 11:05 am 
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Taken behind the Admin buildings at Pafuri Gate. We arrived exactly at sunrise.
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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Nov 01, 2005 7:51 pm 
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Just spent 2 nights at Pafuri Wilderness Camp, what a fabulous place. Saw lots of game in the river below the safari tents - time went to quickly.


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2005 12:49 am 
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arks wrote:
What exactly is the Parfuri Wilderness Camp? Is it a private concession ??


As far as I know it's a camp run by Wilderness Safaris. The camp is located in the Makuleke concession north of the Luvhuvu river.

M


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2005 10:21 am 
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Foxy, what was the bird life in the camp? I have been told that if you like birds you probably won't need leave the camp at all, but this was said by people who have never styed there before.


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2005 7:47 pm 
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Birdlife is very good from the camp, so were the animal sighting, but that would also be dependant on water being in the river.
Pafuri Wilderness camp only opened during the middle of the year - 20 luxury safari tents along the river front. This is probably why many people have not heard about it.
Currently game drives are only in the concession area - on the northern side of the Luvuvhu River. We saw lion twice on different drives. Missed the leopard. Saw a lot of varius antelopes and ellies, zebbies, buffs, monkey's etc.
On one of the 4 drives, we were taken to Lanner Gorge (brilliant view)and on another we had sundowners at Crooks Corner - Limpopo River is currently nothing but sand.


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 Post subject: Pafuri camp
Unread postPosted: Sat Dec 17, 2005 10:51 am 
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Hi all,

Was fortunate to have spent 3 days at the Wilderness safari's Pafuri camp at the start of last week.
Herewith a description of that experience:

The camp is similar to others of the lodge mould.
The staff are very helpful, and service is good.
The accommodation is tented, and luxurious at that.
All units overlook a stretch of the Levuvhu, and are connected by a boardwalk.
Game drives are undertaken by rangers - who are very good, some good at birds, others with other interests.
Ours was a bird guru which is helpful on the team, owing to the birding in that area.
Birds seen - Montagu's harrier (near Punda Maria on way up), gorgeous bushshrike, lesser spotted eagle, broadbilled roller, three banded courser (quite common there, and at most southern distribution).
In general there are birds all around you calling and jumping about.
Mammals - the area is known for its diversity of mammals, and not abundance, though we saw more than expected - probably as a result of rains and we ended up bumping into animals that were out in the bush. We did see lions, ellie (only bulls), buff, Nyala, hippo, Sharpes Grysbok, both bush babies, l spotted Genet, zebra.
Scenery - the most extensive and beautiful fever tree forests I have ever see are on that north side of Levuvhu - rivaling those from KZN.
Lanner gorge is beautiful and one sees the snaking Levuvhu in a very rocky landscape.
Nice baobab dotted landscapes too.
The Limpopo river section seems to have skittish animals - possibly owing to past poaching persecution.
The riverine stretches are particularly beautiful and extensive too.
The actual Levuvhu was quite brown, and was as a result of a recent flash flood, and the colour in part to soil stripping in the Soutpansberg catchment.
As a concession, one knows the story about the restitution some time back (1997?), and the Makuleke community.
The politics is different to the other concessions elsewhere in park.
If it wasn't for the awarding of the concession to game viewing tourism there most certainly would have been crops, and settlement there now.
This unlike the other concessions in park.
I think they are aiming at a South African market a bit, ie. Gauteng, and the rates are very reasonable if you compare to other ones elsewhere.
I would suggest that people spend a few days there and explore that diverse tract of Kruger.
It was a worthwhile experience.


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sat Dec 17, 2005 5:08 pm 
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We stayed there at the end of October and had a wonderful time - also the safari tent (No 7) with the best view. As it was our anniversary and a birthday on the same day, the staff spoilt us no end - the one evening a table was set for the 2 of us next to the swimming pool, away from the rest - all very romantic,
2 of the ladies also made a beautiful card of congratulations for us.
Treasured memories we will have of Pafuri and the staff.
The time went so quickly, a week would have been ideal for chilling out :)
We also saw a lot of bird life and game in the river


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2006 10:43 pm 
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We had two very enjoyable nights at Parfuri last July.
I think the camp had only been opened for a couple of weeks before we arrived.
Here are some 'photos of the camp & our "Tent":-

Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

It was wonderful to wake up looking out over the Luvuvhu River in the mornings.
Just a shame it was dark as we had to be up at 5:30 for the Game Drives!

We had a wonderful 3 days there and the two memories that will stick with us forever are the Hippos at Crooks Corner & being above Lanner Gorge watching the sun set.

It was the first 3 days of our first ever trip to Africa and was a great way to start.
After Pafuri we stayed at Olifants & Skukuza in KNP plus Hluhluwe & Ithala in KZN and one night in Swaziland.
We enjoyed all the camps we stayed at but Pafuri was definitely the highlight of our trip (followed closely by Rileys Hilltop Lodge in Swaziland).

One day we will return, but there's a lot more of Africa to see first!


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2006 1:40 am 
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In Oct of 2004 I spent four weeks in a tent on the side of the Pafuri camp, apart from the Wilderness Co-coordinator, Gary, we were the first group and the last ever to camp there.
We were part of an Eco-training course, which now has a permanent camp closer to the Limpopo River.
I'm not a birder, but a birder in our group was amazed at the variety, one of the posts above does list quite a few birds in the area.
We had vultures nesting in the tree above the tent.
Animal life was fantastic around the camp, much of it seen on the bank of the Luvuvhu River opposite us. Nyala, impala, buffalo, baboon, elephant, hippos, Vervets, hippos, kudu and crocodiles were seen most days.
For ones like the Nyala and baboon it was almost as if they knew our presence would deter predators because they seemed to spend a lot of time there.
Some exceptional sightings were a crocodile laying eggs on the bank opposite, and bull elephants that came almost into camp to have a look.
At night both lions and leopards also came almost into the camp on occasions, their tracks were seen and one evening one of the Ranger Guides nearly walked into a leopard that was watching the tents.
Apart from Outpost we had the entire concession to ourselves for a month and after that I was lucky enough to be there for another two weeks minding the Eco-training camp, one week of which I spent there alone. Game was quite shy though, not used to vehicles but they were slowly improving.
It was very rare to see lions and leopards, though on occasion we had some good sightings.
The local elephants, a group of about 9 bulls who were sometimes in smaller groups, soon got used to us and ignored the vehicle.
The only time we actually saw a breeding herd north of the Luvuvhu we were on foot, walking down to the river.
We noticed the backs of the cows moving through the bush in front of us, and waited until they reached the river bank and vanished from sight down into the river.
There were five of us, three experienced ranger guides, a semi experienced tracker, and me.
The decision was not to go to the river, but to walk back to the vehicle skirting a large grass clearing that bordered the bush.
Scarcely had we taken two steps into the clearing when two lionesses jumped out of nowhere about ten meters in front of us, growled and ran in different directions.
The lead ranger cocked his rifle and the sound caused the lioness running towards us to reverse direction as she realized exactly where we were, and followed her friend across the clearing.
And could they run, they crossed the fifty meter wide clearing in a few seconds and vanished into the bush on the other side.
We just had time to breathe again when their were some enraged screams from the river, and the elephant herd came boiling back into sight.
Attracted by the noise of the lions and protective of their calves they were obviously heading over to deal to the lions, which was fine except the lions were gone and we were in their path.
The head ranger then told us to do something he said later he had never had to do in 14 years of guiding, RUN!!
Despite the fact that we were wearing sandals and shorts, and there were various obstacles like thorn bushes and fallen logs in our path it's amazing how fast you can run with several dozen tons of enraged motherhood behind you.
Fortunately for us they stopped where the lions had been, and proceeded to mill about to make sure they had gone.
Since those days of visitor shy animals I've learned many animals are getting used to the vehicles, lions are seen often and rhino and giraffe have both been introduced to the area where previously they were absent. But it is still a shame that never again will people be able to camp on the banks of the Luvuvhu knowing they are the only ones there.


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