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Sparrow-weaver: Whitebrowed

Identify and index birds in Southern Africa

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francoisd
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Re: Sparrow-weaver: Whitebrowed

Unread postby francoisd » Mon Mar 07, 2011 3:40 pm

For those of you who would like to add this bird to your Kruger Park list there is one colony in Kruger.
I think the first report of the birds back in 2010 mentioned 3-4 birds.

On 2011/02/05 we counted 3 birds.

From Tshokwane travel south on the H10 (the road to Lower Sabie). About 4km from Tshokwane you will find them on the left. Look out for the nests in a tree about 50m from the road. The birds was however sitting in a bush right next to the road.

Should be an easy tick for your Kruger Park List.
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arks
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bird nest ID?

Unread postby arks » Wed Nov 16, 2011 9:58 pm

Does anyone know what bird makes these nests? Seen at MZNP in September 2011.

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RosemaryH
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Re: bird nest ID?

Unread postby RosemaryH » Wed Nov 16, 2011 10:20 pm

Not 100% sure arks but I would say perhaps White Browed Sparrow Weaver. If not I am sure one of our birder pro's will correct me :D

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Re: bird nest ID?

Unread postby Caracal » Wed Nov 16, 2011 11:08 pm

I tend to agree with you Rosemary :thumbs_up:

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Re: bird nest ID?

Unread postby Ladybirder » Wed Nov 16, 2011 11:50 pm

Yes indeed White-browed Sparrow-weaver.These nests have two entrances when breading they close one entrance.

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arks
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Re: bird nest ID?

Unread postby arks » Thu Nov 17, 2011 1:08 am

Thanks to you all for the ID and to Ladybirder for the interesting information as well :thumbs_up:
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Re: Sparrow-weaver: Whitebrowed

Unread postby Wild about cats » Fri Feb 28, 2014 9:14 am

The White-Browed Sparrow Weaver, Plocepasser mahali, is easily identified by its large white eyebrow stripe and white rump (this is diagnostic and quite conspicuous when the bird is in flight). It is a small bird, measuring about 17-19cm. Birds in the north of the region may show speckling on the breast. Males have black beaks, while females have horn-coloured beaks. Juveniles resemble the adults but often show pinkish beaks.

It is a short-tailed and rather plump bird, which inhabits thornveld and dry river courses, usually in pairs or small flocks. It builds messy nests in the outside branches of a tree, usually from dry grass, throughout the year. Nests tend to be on the West side of trees.

Within their groups there is often a dominant male and female who are accompanied by helpers. Nests are built by all members. They are usually seen in areas of overgrazing where they forage on the ground for seeds and insects. They are highly vocal birds. When disturbed will fly into nearby trees.

Their breeding season is May to February, but mainly October to December. They can have up to 4 broods in a breeding season.

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A younger bird, nicely showing the pink tint of the bill.

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