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 Post subject: Re: Question?? Addo
Unread postPosted: Wed Feb 02, 2011 8:04 pm 
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Joined: Sun Feb 22, 2009 11:45 pm
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Location: Port Elizabeth
Addo elephants were once renowned for their aggressive behaviour and hated man, they were hunted to near extinction by P J Pretorious and many people have been killed by the elephants. So we must never think they are tame they are wild animals and if you get out of your car I am sure your survival rate will be zero. It seems they are friendly to our cars and not us.


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 Post subject: Re: Question?? Addo
Unread postPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2011 3:44 pm 
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Hi Hanliemarais,

The current Addo elephant population has grown from a very small gene pool of only 11 elephants. Of the original 11 elephants, there were some which did not have tusks (tusklessness does naturally occur in elephant populations) and many of the big tuskers were shot by hunters in the previous century. Tusklessness is one of the results of the small genetic pool but it does not seem to have affected / disadvantaged the elephants in any way. All bull elephants have tusks while currently only 13 cow elephants have tusks (some have only one tusk).

In 2002 and 2003, eight Kruger bulls were brought into the Park to diversify the gene pool, not specifically for tusks but to increase the health of the gene pool. In 2005, eleven of the more dominant Addo bulls were relocated to various private game reserves to give the Kruger bulls a better chance of breeding with the Addo elephant cows and therefore better chance of getting there genes into the population.

The Addo elephants were habituated to vehicles by Dr Anthony Hall-Martin (as Friedrich mentioned below) and over the years have become very used to vehicles - but NOT people out of vehicles :naughty: - at close quarters due to the number of vehicles they see daily in a relatively small area (compared to e.g. Kruger).

Musth bulls can be aggressive or irritable at times but it really depends on the specific bull and the period of their musth so its best to be cautious around them anyway.

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Megan Taplin
Communications Manager: Frontier Region


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 Post subject: Help to ID this elephant
Unread postPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2011 9:48 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jun 14, 2008 3:03 pm
Posts: 169
Hi guys,

Can someone help to ID this elephant. Spotted right hand side of the grassland near the old gate in the middle of the park. This was taken in 2009. Wanted to upload this backin 2009 but lost the SD card and images. Lucky I found a few pics on a friends card who was with me at the time. Apologies for the old pics.

When we approached the Elephant it was laying on it's side. Looked like it was fast asleep or dying.
At first I thought it was sleeping so sat and watched then after 15min I got worried and though it was dying,as far as I know elephants don't lay down for so long. so made some noise, to see if he was sleeping or dying, clapped hands and nothing happened. His breathing was very shallow and not much chest movement. So I thought he was about to die. I opened and slammed the car door and then he quickly jumped up and looked very much alive. So I figured he was sleeping. Upon returning to the park in 2010 just 500m from where I saw this sighting I see there is an elephant skeleton. Wondering if its the same elephant.

Image

Image

Any help to ID this elephant will be great. Is he still alive or was this one of his final moments.


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 Post subject: Re: Help to ID this elephant
Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2011 6:58 am 
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Interesting post simonB - hope someone is able to reply with some added info.

Unfortunately I cannot see the images you have posted. Not sure why - just states "access denied"??

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Rose
Travel Slowly *Stop Often *Learn as much as you can *Relax and Enjoy!


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 Post subject: Re: Help to ID this elephant
Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2011 9:21 am 
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Joined: Sat Jun 14, 2008 3:03 pm
Posts: 169
Hi RosemaryH,

Thank you for your comment and for letting me know the pics are broken.
The images lifted from twitpic seem to have a hotlinking timeout limit on them,since they worked fine last night.


Please see theimages at the links below.

1. http://twitpic.com/67560t
2. http://twitpic.com/6755l4


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 Post subject: Re: Help to ID this elephant
Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2011 9:55 am 
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Joined: Wed Oct 08, 2008 3:56 pm
Posts: 9542
Location: CH - Lugano
Hi simonB! Maybe if you post in the Addo thread here, it will be more likely that someone can help you :thumbs_up:


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 Post subject: Re: Help to ID this elephant
Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2011 10:07 am 
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Joined: Sat Jun 14, 2008 3:03 pm
Posts: 169
Thanx for the feedback Micetta,

Will try as per your suggestion.


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 Post subject: Re: Addo: Elephants
Unread postPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2011 9:01 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jun 14, 2008 3:03 pm
Posts: 169
Hi guys,

Can someone help to ID this elephant. Spotted right hand side of the grassland near the old gate in the middle of the park. This was taken in 2009. Wanted to upload this backin 2009 but lost the SD card and images. Lucky I found a few pics on a friends card who was with me at the time. Apologies for the old pics.

When we approached the Elephant it was laying on it's side. Looked like it was fast asleep or dying.
At first I thought it was sleeping so sat and watched then after 15min I got worried and though it was dying,as far as I know elephants don't lay down for so long. so made some noise, to see if he was sleeping or dying, clapped hands and nothing happened. His breathing was very shallow and not much chest movement. So I thought he was about to die. I opened and slammed the car door and then he quickly jumped up and looked very much alive. So I figured he was sleeping. Upon returning to the park in 2010 just 500m from where I saw this sighting I see there is an elephant skeleton. Wondering if its the same elephant.

Any help to ID this elephant will be great. Is he still alive or was this one of his final moments.

Please see theimages at the links below.

1. http://twitpic.com/67560t
2. http://twitpic.com/6755l4


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 Post subject: Re: Help to ID this elephant
Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 02, 2011 7:50 am 
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Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2011 11:40 am
Posts: 160
Location: Port Elizabeth
simonB wrote:


When we approached the Elephant it was laying on it's side. Looked like it was fast asleep or dying.
At first I thought it was sleeping so sat and watched then after 15min I got worried and though it was dying,as far as I know elephants don't lay down for so long. so made some noise, to see if he was sleeping or dying, clapped hands and nothing happened. His breathing was very shallow and not much chest movement. So I thought he was about to die. I opened and slammed the car door and then he quickly jumped up and looked very much alive. So I figured he was sleeping.


Is this the sort of behavior one should adopt? We should let nature run its course and if a magnificant animal such as the elephant is dying let it die in peace and dont slam car doors and act stupid, the animal could have turned on you. Many times I have met people who shout , slam doors bang on doors to get an animals attention and all that happens is it gets up and walks away spoiling the sighting for everyone.


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 Post subject: Re: Help to ID this elephant
Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 02, 2011 8:04 am 
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Joined: Sat Jun 14, 2008 3:03 pm
Posts: 169
@Jad

I do agree with your comments.

I grew up in the bushveld and also hate it when people make noise and scare animals.
I also know that sometimes when an animal is sick or dying Sanparks could be called in to investigate.

If there is disease in th park etc, they need to catch this early.
This animal did not look old and so Iwas worried and if he did not stand up sanparks would have been notified to investigate. When he jumpedup and walked of i figured he must have just been fast asleep.

Something which I never knew elephants did during the day. In fact barely did while humans or predators where around.

Apologies if my behavior offends you.

Also there where no other cars or people near when this happened so I did not disturb the sight for others. I request if this ele is still alive because if he is then the video I have would be very useful for researches as it proves that elephants even in the wild are know to sleep for extended periods.


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 Post subject: Re: Help to ID this elephant
Unread postPosted: Sat Sep 03, 2011 9:35 am 
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Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2011 11:40 am
Posts: 160
Location: Port Elizabeth
Hi Simon, The only thing I am concerned about is stressing the animal out not whether it disturbs other peoples sighting, I would rather inform the rangers of the situation and let them deal with it. It is good to know that you are a concerned visitor and hopefully you will visit Addo many more times, regards JAD


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 Post subject: Re: Help to ID this elephant
Unread postPosted: Sun Sep 04, 2011 11:42 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jun 14, 2008 3:03 pm
Posts: 169
Thanx for the message @Jad

Addo has become my second home, I will be back again and again and again ;-)


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 Post subject: Some questions about Addo Ellies
Unread postPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2011 8:34 pm 
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Joined: Sun Sep 25, 2011 10:58 am
Posts: 7
Hi
We were in Addo in october 2011, and I am now sorting through the pictures, and making some notes in the family album.
Several questions came up
1. Are female -ellies supposed to ahev tuskes? There was a note on one of the boards in the information center that there are only 13 cows with tusks. It was written that this is because of isolation. Could anyone elaborate on that?

2. I read that the ellies leave in female-dominated herds (not sure if herd id the right word), and that male are mostly alone. We saw quite a lot of males in the herds in Addo - are all those males still young ? some of them were really big!

3. We saw some ellies with different colour: even black (please see photo attached) - is this some kind of mud?

https://picasaweb.google.com/1111008613 ... 5732888274

Thanks
Yanina


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 Post subject: Re: Some questions about Addo Ellies
Unread postPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2011 12:54 pm 
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Hi Yanina and welcome to the forum

Tusklessness is a naturally occuring phenomenon in elephant populations. in the Addo population, we see it on a greater scale - all the females except a few (13) - are tuskless. This occurred because of the very small genetic pool from which this population grew. In the original Addo elephant population, there were already a few tuskless elephants and hunters had probabaly singled out the big tuskers in previous centuries.
We have introduced 8 elephant bulls from Kruger NP in previous years to try to improve the genetic vareity in the population. This is not necessarily going to lead to more tusked cows showing up in the population, but it might be one of the effects.
Tusklessness does not seem to have any impact on the physical condition of the elephant cows, it doesn't disadvantage them in any way.

Elephants do have a matriarchal society and the majority of each family group is made up of related females and their calves/subadults. Bulls usually leave the herd around puberty (about 12-15 yrs old) but they will often come back to their family group or other family groups to socialise and to mate with cows in oestrus when they are older.

Elephants mud bath frequently, especially in the hot summer as it is a way of cooling down and helps to rid their skin of parasites. The different colours you see are as a result of different soil types/compositions. Mud may also dry a different colour than its wet state. Sometimes you will see dark mud, other times red/orange mud (people often call these ellies the "orange elephants") and sometimes almost white/grey mud.

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Megan Taplin
Communications Manager: Frontier Region


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 Post subject: Re: Some questions about Addo Ellies
Unread postPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2011 6:02 pm 
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Joined: Sun Sep 25, 2011 10:58 am
Posts: 7
Hi Megan,
thanks very much for the answers and welcome.
We enjoyed very much our stay in Addo.
The visitor center contains a lot of interesting information.
I am still going over my notes :)

thanks
Yanina


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