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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2007 5:43 pm 
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Virtual Ranger
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Location: SA
The animals listed on the site are:
-Elephant shrew: Cape Rock, Smiths Rock, Round-eared.
-Shrew: Lesser Red musk, Forest, Lesser Dwarf.
-Bat: Slit-faced, Cape Serotine, Melck's Serotine.
-Monkey: Vervet.
-Baboon: Chacma
-Hare: Cape, Scrub.
-Rabbit: Smith's Red Rock, Riverine.
-Mouse: Pouched, Grey Pygmy Climbing, Pygmy, Grant's Rock, Namaqua Rock, Multimammate, Striped.
-Gerbil: Short-tailed, Hairy-footed.
-Rat: Karoo Bush, Saunders' Vlei.
-Dormouse: Speckled.
-Porcupine.
-Molerat: Common.
-Fox: Cape, Bat-eared.
-Otter: Cape Clawless.
-Polecat: Striped.
-Mongoose: Water, Small Grey, Yellow.
-Suricate.
-Genet: Small spotted.
-Aardwolf.
-Caracal.
-Wild cat: African.
-Aardvark.
-Hyrax: Rock.
-Rhino: Black.
-Zebra: Burchell's, Cape Mountain.
-Wildebbest: Black.
-Hartebeest: Red.
-Klipspringer.
-Steenbok.
-Gemsbok.
-Springbok.
-Kudu.
-Eland.
-Duiker: Common.
-Rhebuck: Grey.
-Reedbuck: Mountain.

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 Post subject: Rhino in Karoo ?
Unread postPosted: Sat Oct 27, 2007 6:05 pm 
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I have heard that there are black rhino in the Karoo NP as part of a joint venture with Nam Wildlife....can anyone confirm this for me please?


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 11:23 am 
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Guru
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Hi PThree

Yes, there are black rhino (Diceros bicornis bicornis subspecies) in Karoo NP. There are now four rhino, two of which were introduced this year from Namibia. Black rhino were first reintroduced into the Park in 2005.[/i]

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 Post subject: Skink I.D needed
Unread postPosted: Sun Dec 27, 2009 1:57 pm 
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Location: Johannesburg
Hi,

Does anybody know what kind of skink this is from the Karoo National Park.

Image

Thanks,

Samantha

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 Post subject: Re: Skink I.D needed
Unread postPosted: Sun Dec 27, 2009 2:11 pm 
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looks like a breeding male western rock skink, due to the dark colouring, it also is common on rock outcrops in the karoo and namibia

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 Post subject: Is this Riverine Rabbit?
Unread postPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 9:02 pm 
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Location: Finland
It took this picture in September 2008 in Karoo NP, during the last rays of daylight.

I just recently processed it, and posted on another forum, where some discussion about the ID is taking place. Can somebody here confirm if this is, or is not Riverine Rabbit, one of the most endangered mammals in the world.

Image

- olli


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 Post subject: Re: Is this Riverine Rabbit?
Unread postPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 10:15 pm 
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Distinguished Virtual Ranger
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No, it is not the Riverine Rabbit. Easy way to tell ... look at the white tail ... Riverine does not have a white tail.

It is either the Scrub hare or the Cape hair. Difficult to tell which one from this photo.

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 Post subject: Karoo Tortoises
Unread postPosted: Wed Oct 06, 2010 10:42 am 
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according to SANparks website abour about Karoo NP they have 5 Tortoises. Im looking for more information about them please.

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 Post subject: Re: Karoo Tortoises
Unread postPosted: Wed Oct 06, 2010 4:35 pm 
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Louis

The Leopard tortoise (Bergskilpad) is obviously one of the five. I have also seen Angulate tortoise (Ploegskaarskilpad) and Tent tortoise (Knoppiesdopskilpad) in the park. Boulenger's Padloper (Karoo Padloper) will also be in the park as well as the Parrot-beaked Tortoise (Papegaaibekskilpad).

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 Post subject: Re: Karoo Tortoises
Unread postPosted: Thu Oct 07, 2010 3:14 pm 
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Louis

My apology - I was wrong with the Parrot-beaked Tortoise (Homopus areolatus). It is the Greater Padloper (Groot Padloper - Homopus femoralis) which is also to be found in Karoo National Park.

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 Post subject: Re: Karoo Tortoises
Unread postPosted: Tue Oct 12, 2010 3:45 pm 
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The five tortoise species in Karoo NP are:

1.The leopard tortoise (Geochelone pardalis) – black dots on its earth-coloured shell give it its name;

2. The tent tortoise (Psammobates tentorius) – is equally distinct with yellow and black geometric designs on its shell;

3. The angulate tortoise (Chersina angulata) – the shell of this tortoise has slightly curved shields which give it the very apt name of “ploegskaarskilpad” (ploughshare tortoise) in Afrikaans;

4. The Karoo Padloper (Homotus boulengeri) - this is undoubtedly the most common tortoise in the Karoo and it is also often called the “donderweerskilpad” (thunder storm tortoise). Its great activity during stormy weather earns it this name – these tortoises seem to always take to the road when thunderstorms or bad weather is about and this has also led farmers to believe that tortoises head for the hills and high ground if flooding is imminent. Similarly dry seasons are indicated when these padloper (road walker) tortoises head away from the koppies into low lying areas.

5. The Greater Padloper (Homotus femoralis) – this is the larger cousin of the common padloper tortoise. It is easily identified as it has four claws on its front feet – all other tortoise species have five.

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 Post subject: Re: Predator-proof fence extended in Karoo National Park
Unread postPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 4:10 pm 
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I wish a spokesperson for the Karoo National Park, or Frontier Parks, or SANParks can inform us about the latest status regarding the planned release of cheetahs in the park. Can a moderator maybe "press on somebody's button" to give us an answer?

This has been coming on for a number of years now. The park fence has originally been electrified for the release of cheetahs. In the meantime lions and brown hyenas have been released. The speculation about the sustainability of the springbok population (foreseen to be the main prey for cheetahs in the park) has been raised on this forum before. But we never receive a clear and unadulterated reply.

I have once shared what I heard from one of the park's honorary rangers. Another forumite nearly stoned me (with words) and a spokesperson for the Frontier Parks (at that stage) said that it was not the full truth.

Thus - what is the situation regarding the planned release of cheetahs? And if the springbok population plays a role in this decision - what is the reason that their numbers apparently struggle to increase to desired levels?

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 Post subject: Re: Predator-proof fence extended in Karoo National Park
Unread postPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 9:11 am 
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The introduction of cheetah into Karoo National Park is still on the cards. However, as we hope you can understand, any new introductions should be planned and carried out according to planning regimes and depend on the availability of resources.

A population - in this case, springbok, cannot recover in a short space of time of one to two years. Their numbers need to be monitored over a length of time to ensure that should cheetah be introduced, it won't put a possible additional strain on their numbers.

Please bear with us.

Fayroush Ludick
Communications Manager - Frontier Region


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 Post subject: Re: Predator-proof fence extended in Karoo National Park
Unread postPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 11:16 am 
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Location: Cape Town
Hi FrontierPR

The feedback given is much appreciated, I do have a couple of questions though.

Since the "Jackal removal" and the introduction of Springbok, have there been a count or estimate of the numbers? Are there any signs of numbers increasing?

I am a regular visitor to Karoo National Park and always watch the Sightings Thread but for some reason it is just not as active as some of the other smaller parks for example Augrabies and Mountain Zebra. Will this change in the future?


Do appreciate the time taken to answer everyone's questions.
Pedre


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 Post subject: Re: Predator-proof fence extended in Karoo National Park
Unread postPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 8:25 pm 
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Junior Virtual Ranger
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Posts: 559
Location: Somerset West
Hi Fayroush,

Thanks for the answer!

It still does not say very much -- in essence it is the same answer we have been receiving since the first news reports of the fence going up in time for the World Cup in 2010 -- every year we ask the same question, and evey year there is this same neutral answer without actually giving figures...

How about giving us the stats: Springbuck in 2010 = 500; 2011= 520; 2012 =600; 2013 =400 or whatever. Then we could understand your concern.

To put it another way -- you are happy to have 10+ lions in the park (surely they catch a springbuck or two even though it is not their main prey item), but not even 1 cheetah, that would eat far less than a lion... doesn't make sense to me.

Still, thanks for bothering to answer!

God bless,

Friedrich von Horsten

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