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 Post subject: Re: Skukuza at Addo
Unread postPosted: Thu May 06, 2010 12:59 pm 
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I just randomly stumbled across the article on the SANParks website (http://www.sanparks.org/parks/addo/news ... r_dies.php) - WOW! Not really sure what else to say :shock:


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 Post subject: Re: Skukuza at Addo
Unread postPosted: Sun May 16, 2010 8:43 am 
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Wow. That's really sad news. I was lucky enough to see him in September, and I was blown away by how huge he was.


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 Post subject: Re: Skukuza at Addo
Unread postPosted: Mon May 17, 2010 1:35 am 
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Here's a photo I took of some people who were a little too close...

Image


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 Post subject: Re: Twin baby elephants at Addo
Unread postPosted: Tue Jun 01, 2010 2:32 pm 
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Hi Elephants Eye,

Its quite unlikely that these two baby elephants are twins considering the drought in the Addo area. The prolonged drought means that there is less vegetation and poorer quality vegetation available to elephants and this affects their condition. The elephant population growth rate has decreased and there has been an increase in the number of miscarriages because of the poor condition of the female elephants. For twins to survive more than one or two months after birth usually requires the mother elephant to be in excellent condition with access to enough vegetation and water to produce enough milk for two babies.

These two elephant babies could be just associating and playing together. However, there is a chance they could be twins although this has not been confirmed by our rangers or researchers.

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 Post subject: Re: Twin baby elephants at Addo
Unread postPosted: Wed Jun 09, 2010 4:01 pm 
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Thank you.

I have put your comment up in a new post.

http://elephantseyegarden.blogspot.com/ ... y-not.html

Hope the drought has improved since we were there in March?


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 Post subject: Re: Twin baby elephants at Addo
Unread postPosted: Thu Jun 10, 2010 9:24 am 
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Well, we have had two good stints of rain - one at the end of April and one yesterday - but we need much more to really make an impact. of course, it will also take some time for the rainfall to ahve an effect on vegetation quality and quantity.

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 Post subject: Re: Addo: Elephants
Unread postPosted: Thu Sep 02, 2010 10:57 am 
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I read last night in a book authored by P.H. Capstick that P.J. Pretorius was the man who took up the job of thinning out the Kali or rogue elephants in the Addo district years ago. A job that was reckoned by many a great hunter, including famous Frederick Selous (who got the Selous Game Reserve named after him) to be impossible to achieve.

I did a simple Google search and here is a nice summary of P.J. Pretorius' life:

Quote:
Major P. J. Pretorius, a descendant of the Voortrekker leader, Andries Pretorius, after whom South Africa’s administrative capital was named, was born in the Transvaal in 1876. At the age of 16 his father sent him to be a transport rider in the British South Africa Company. After taking part in the Matabele Wars, he worked on a mine to save money for his own-pioneering expeditions. He left Rhodesia in 1899 and crossed the Zambesi. For the next three years he wandered together with his African servants in the unexplored and game-filled territory known at that time as Zambesia. He writes “I was so lost to the ‘civilized’ world that I never heard of the Boer War until it was all over!”

Pretorius collected ivory and caught wild animals alive for zoos. At one time he traveled in central Africa and hunted with the pygmies.

His life was one of hardships, demanding resilience and independence. A brutal slave trade was still in existence and the tribesmen were suspicious of all intruders. Once Pretorius was almost killed when falsely accused of murdering a chief. The actual culprit was later sentenced to be roasted alive. After a trip to Europe, Pretorius returned to what was then Tanganyika and tried to farm in the Rufiji Delta.

His intimate knowledge of the area and his skills as a tracker were put to good use in World War I when he helped the Royal Navy find and destroy the German battle cruiser Konigsberg. Later he was one of General Smuts’s Scouts during the East African Campaign. He attained the rank of Major at this time and was awarded the C.M.G. and D.S.O.

Even in his mature years Pretorius could not bear to remain settled on his property at Nylstroom, Transvaal. He accepted an invitation to thin out the elephant in the Addo Bush near Port Elizabeth – a task which had been declared impossible by the accomplished elephant hunter, F.C.Selous. Later he made films of wild life.

Pretorius died in November 1945. Two years after his death, Jungle Man, a book compiled from his own notes, was published.

“Living dangerously is twice blessed,” he wrote. “It blesses the moment with elation; it blesses the after-day with warm memories. If a man has trodden unknown trails and landed on lost beaches, when age comes the domestic hearth is a camp-fire where old dramas are relived.”


For starters, both Peter Capstick and I would love to know what the hell P.J. stood for! And then secondly if there is anything that describes P.J.'s adventures during the Addo operation, I would love to read about it here.

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W™

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 Post subject: Re: Addo: Elephants
Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 03, 2010 5:55 pm 
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For Addo History, you might wanna have a look at this book:
The Addo Elephants - Book - ISBN 0869530119


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 Post subject: Re: Addo: Elephants
Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 03, 2010 6:47 pm 
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wildtuinman: Here's your Answer to P.J. :

Major Philip Jacobus (Jan) Pretorius (1877–1945), a descendant of Boer hero Andries Pretorius (1798–1853).

Found on this page:
http://www.koedoe.co.za/index.php/koedoe/article/view/880/1132
look down under the heading: The Early 20TH Century


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 Post subject: Re: Addo: Elephants
Unread postPosted: Tue Sep 14, 2010 11:37 am 
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Are the elephants differant too kruger. To me they seem smaller. Are they the same as i see that some of the elephants came from kruger or did all of them come from Kruger?

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 Post subject: Re: Addo: Elephants
Unread postPosted: Tue Sep 14, 2010 2:12 pm 
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Hi

This much I know - only a handful came from Kruger to broaden the gene pool.
Addo elephants are different and from interbreeding over many years there are distinct signs, like the lack of tusks and generally much smaller tusks. All the ellies with reasonable tusks are Kruger imports. They are also on average smaller that their Kruger family.

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My latest trip report to Addo during June 2009:
http://www.sanparks.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=27&t=34300


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 Post subject: Re: Addo: Elephants
Unread postPosted: Tue Sep 14, 2010 2:34 pm 
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When we visited Addo last year, we were told four/five Kruger Bulls were brought in (one of them Skukuza, was killed this year by another bull).

The female Addo Ellies stopped growing tusks (interbreeding from the original 11 apparently was the cause), but with the new genes they are growing again. :thumbs_up:

I can stand corrected to these details! :D

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 Post subject: Oldest Addo bull elephant dies
Unread postPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 2:38 pm 
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Rangers recently found the skeleton and tusks of an elephant bull and after a bit of investigation and checking with the elephant researchers, realised it was the remains of Gaatjies.

Gaatjies was the oldest elephant bull in the park (born 1954) and one of the biggest Addo tuskers. He was the most dominant bull in the Park for over 20 years and would therefore be the father of many of the younger elephants in the Park today.

We believe he died of natural causes (old age).

Image

Image

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 Post subject: Re: Oldest Addo bull elephant dies
Unread postPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 2:46 pm 
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Well at least he was able to have a full and 'natural' life...wasn't it great that such a big creature could live so long. Hopefully many of his youngsters will be able to enjoy such a long life as well.

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 Post subject: Re: Oldest Addo bull elephant dies
Unread postPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 4:26 pm 
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He for sure was a beautiful animal, it is proof that there are Tuskers in Addo.

All part of the renewal process.

Now many can be on the lookout for emerging tuskers in Addo, carrying his genes.

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