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South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues

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onewithnature
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Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues

Unread postby onewithnature » Mon Nov 05, 2012 5:45 pm

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Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues

Unread postby Guinea Pig » Mon Nov 05, 2012 9:40 pm

Bush Baptist wrote:
Then snotklap. What you would like to do to the kid doing a vloermoer (as per billyf previously) when his parents think it is cute. Pronounced as you see it.



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Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues

Unread postby Grantmissy » Fri Mar 01, 2013 8:21 am

A few Afrikaans phrases that I can think of:

Ooo nee Boet! - Oh no, that is not how it is done
Bekkig – Talkative
In sy muhr in – Very much broken and no hope to be fixed ever again.
Opsitkers - A candle that is lit for a romantic evening where the romance is overseen and guided by older people and the romantic evening lasts until the candle is burnt out.
Padkos – Often hard boiled eggs, cold boerewors and tomato and onion sandwiches that is packed for the road when you traveling.
Geelperske reën – Soaking rain that lasts for a few days – like today on parts of SA.
Slinger-om-die-Smoel – Food made from dough that is cut into long ribbons and cooked in cinnamon, sugar and creamy milk - often enjoyed on rainy days
Pluimpie – You are :thumbs_up:
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Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues

Unread postby pops » Fri Mar 01, 2013 11:38 am

Does this qualify?

Geel water = whiskey

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Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues

Unread postby okie » Sun Mar 03, 2013 7:07 pm

Nee jong , I've never heard of that one :naughty: .
But " geraas water " - noise water for strong drink like brandy or whisky .
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Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues

Unread postby Delene D » Sun Mar 03, 2013 7:21 pm

Grantmissy - Slinger om die smoel - I have never heard, our family call something similar but made flour and cinnamon made into crumbs with butter and cooked in milk forming "Klonte" and porridge - we call it Melk kos.
Lekker on a cold rainy Sunday evening as is pannekoek with sugar and cinnamon and golden syrup.
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Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues

Unread postby Grantmissy » Mon Mar 04, 2013 8:00 am

Hi Delene :D Another Afrikaans word that we used was afvalligheidjies which translated into English is perhaps “Sweetbreads”? but afvalligheidjies were made on many South African farms and in the Dorpe (towns in the country) for lunch or dinner and included Kop, Pens-en-Pote (a kind of meat dish/stew).
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Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues

Unread postby pops » Mon Mar 04, 2013 11:33 am

Afval is usually known as offal in english. This is adequately illustrated by your saying "kop, pens en pote" which is afrikaans for head, tripe and trotters. My step grand mother ate those kind of things I sure as hell didn't!

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Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues

Unread postby Bush Baptist » Mon Mar 04, 2013 1:35 pm

I have been through the whole thread and we have missed some of the iconic Afrikaans sayings that must mean something to them, but are meaningless in English, like

Ja-nee. Literally yes-no. What the heck is that? Yes or no? The best offering I can come up with is that it is a 'noise' term. like the English 'basically', which means nothing but gives the speaker an extra second to try to think if something to say.

Anderkant. Translated the other side. The other side of what? What is this side? How many sides ARE there? Good luck to those who ask them for directions.
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Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues

Unread postby NetEk » Mon Mar 04, 2013 1:59 pm

Bush Baptist wrote:Anderkant. Translated the other side. The other side of what? What is this side? How many sides ARE there? Good luck to those who ask them for directions.


Anderkant: is the other side from where you are. Normally joined with a object or location. Eg anderkant die berg = on the otherside of the mountain.
Hierdiekant: is the side you are = this side. Eg net hierdiekant van die berg = just this side of the mountain.

Do note I used the mountain as example, I thought being from Cape Town you will understand :w:
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Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues

Unread postby Bush Baptist » Mon Mar 04, 2013 2:08 pm

Thanks for the explanation NetEk.

Which side of the mountain am I on? Pinelands, ok.

Which side is 'the other side'? City bowl? Camp's Bay? Kirstenbosch? Hout Bay? As clear as mud. :twisted:

I prefer directions like 'at 18h30 at the green bench on the walkway outside the restaurant at Skukuza' not 'anderkant' which could be a million locations. :wink:

I am a rooinek ou 'topie' and don't do vague, I prefer precise. (rednecked old timer).
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Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues

Unread postby Bennievis » Mon Mar 04, 2013 2:38 pm

Ja-nee.. ol' grumpy, ja-nee :thumbs_up:

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Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues

Unread postby Bush Baptist » Mon Mar 04, 2013 5:40 pm

Ja! :thumbs_up: :tongue:
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Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues

Unread postby Rooies » Mon Mar 04, 2013 7:04 pm

Some people just have a way with words. I overheard an Advocate telling a witness "Sir, I am saying that you are lying but I think you have a stressful relationship with the truth" and

"Jy praat die waarheid darem nou snaaks" "you are talking the truth somewhat funny"
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Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues

Unread postby billyf » Mon Mar 04, 2013 7:08 pm

My favourite Afrikaans word which is beautifully descriptive is "vloermoer" (having/throwing a tantrum)

I think we have all seen nasty little ankle biters lying on the ground in the supermarket venting their frustration for not getting what they wanted. :roll:
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