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Recipes including Biltong, Potjie & Amarula Coffee

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rusky
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Unread postby rusky » Fri May 09, 2008 7:49 am

@JvR - thanks. Not so sure of the apricot jam tho. Prefer savoury flavours with my fish. Howz about - sp onions/shallots + lemongrass + chilli w a crisp Sauv Blanc :)
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Unread postby Pjw » Fri May 09, 2008 7:55 am

Rusky, The newer skottles for the gas bottles have a non stick coating but I often use the tin foil cover as I'm lazy :redface: and it makes it easier to clean! :lol:
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Unread postby BunnyHugger » Fri May 09, 2008 8:51 am

Thanks for the tips there Rusky.

My skottel is not that old so it should in any event be a non stick. I am a little nervous to try the salt thing but will experiment wih an old pan or something before I go wrecking any of my equipment.

May be a good thing to do it with my pot (potjie) although I just super heated it and "cooked" oil in it for a long time and repeatedly.

This helped reduce the rust while cooking and it is a significant reduction. Certainly worked on the lid.
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Unread postby LoOnZ » Fri May 09, 2008 9:31 am

rusky wrote:@LoOnz - Your Chic dish sounds a bit like "butter chicken" or "chicken Makhani" where they used tandoori chicken cubes. What is Koljana?


It is Makhani aka Butter Chicken.

Koljana - Coriander Powder

Tandoori chicken cubes are for Chicken Tandoor or a more spicey Mirch.
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Unread postby lisa » Wed Jun 04, 2008 11:14 pm

Lately I have been making grilled pizza a lot so I imagine it would work on a braai too. No pan is necessary -- you cook it directly on a very hot grid and it cooks in only a couple of minutes per side. I like to pre-cook some of the veggies before I put them on the pizza.

Ingredients:

Refrigerated or frozen pizza dough/bread dough (or homemade)
Olive oil
Flour
Your favorite toppings (onions, tomatoes, cheese, basil or oregano, sweet peppers, mushrooms, sausage, olives, etc.)

Let dough come to room temperature, and heat grill/braai until very hot. Sprinkle flour on a flat work surface to prevent dough from sticking to it, and roll or press out pizza dough (using hands or rolling pin) until it is flat and as thin as you can get it. Brush a generous amount of olive oil on both sides of the dough to prevent it from sticking to the grid. When the grill is extremely hot, place the oiled dough directly on the grid for about 2-3 minutes. Using tongs or spatula or both, flip over the dough to allow the other side to cook, sprinkle toppings thinly on top of the cooked side, and allow to finish cooking for about 2-3 more minutes. Remove from heat and serve.

My favorite is plain old tomato, basil, mozzarella but it is really good with pre-cooked sausage, onions, and peppers too. A great way to use up leftovers.
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Unread postby Lockie » Sun Jun 15, 2008 4:15 pm

This is not really a recipe, but when we were in the parks we did the braai thing and loved it. There is nothing like cooking over a wood fire, but takes some getting used to as we mostly "bar b que" with gas. Here's a tip to keep those new pans, or skottles from getting all black and smokey on the bottom. Simply rub some hand soap on the bottom of the pan (outside of course) before putting on the braai. It keeps the pan like new and clean up is a breeze!

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Unread postby Foxy » Thu Jul 03, 2008 10:34 pm

Coconut

Now that we have drunk the milk out of the coconuts we bought - I didn't really enjoy it - what is the quickest / easiest way to get all that hairy fibre off it.?

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Unread postby rusky » Fri Jul 04, 2008 9:17 am

Foxy wrote:Coconut

Now that we have drunk the milk out of the coconuts we bought - I didn't really enjoy it - what is the quickest / easiest way to get all that hairy fibre off it.?


????????
If its a tender coconut you trim the top and peirce a hole then insert a straw to get the water,

If its a mature cocnut (brown hairy) you use the back of a cleaver to crack it in half, emptying the juice in a cup.

Have I understood your query correctly?
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Unread postby Foxy » Fri Jul 04, 2008 7:57 pm

Rusky, I need to get the hairy stuff off. I didn't like the liquid :roll:

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Unread postby rusky » Wed Jul 16, 2008 4:11 am

Foxy wrote:Rusky, I need to get the hairy stuff off. I didn't like the liquid :roll:


Dont take the hair off. Break in half - using the back of a heavy knife. The white flesh is normally scraped off with a special tool. Or score the white inner kernel and it will come off in chunks.

Or since you dont like the juice you can do it this way
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MSCRBiKY1GI&NR=1
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Unread postby DuQues » Thu Jul 17, 2008 12:42 pm

Pjw wrote:Snoek is a fish caught off the Cape coast. It probably has an English name but I've never heard it.

Thyrsites atun a.k.a. snoek, is a long, thin, perch-like commercial food fish belonging to the Gempylidae family. It is found in the seas of the Southern Hemisphere. It is also known in Australia as barracouta though it is not related nor should it be confused with Barracuda. It can grow up to 200 cm. (78 inches)long and weigh as much as 6 kg. (13.23 lbs,). It is found near continental shelves or around islands and feeds on crustaceans, cephalopods and small fish like anchovy and pilchard. This species will form schools near the bottom or midwater; sometimes even near the surface at night. It prefers sea water temperature between 13° and 18°C.

It is sold fresh, smoked, canned and frozen. It can be cooked by frying, broiling, baking and it can also be microwaved. It is also made and eaten as fishcakes in regions such as Japan. It is prepared most often by grilling, frying or smoking. It is oily, extremely bony (although the bones are large and easily removed from the cooked fish) and has very fine scales which are almost undetectable, making it unnecessary to scale the fish while cleaning. Snoek has a very distinctive taste. Though very popular in regions like South Africa, it was not so popular to certain generations of British residents during the Second World War due to it being considered a food item of deprivation. Canned Snoek was imported in large quantities into Great Britain and government marketing of the product was not successful and may have had a negative effect. In South Africa, it is mostly caught and eaten in the southwestern coastal parts of the country. It is traditionally served grilled over coals with boiled sweet potatoes. This is a regional speciality.

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Re: All Recipes including Biltong & Potjie

Unread postby Lockie » Sun Aug 24, 2008 5:21 pm

Well I've gone through 11 pages of recipes. Been drooling so much I nearly shorted out the keyboard, but I must have missed the recipe for Rusks...anyone care to direct me to a recipe. I loved them when we were in saffie :dance:

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Re: All Recipes including Biltong & Potjie

Unread postby Jazil » Sun Aug 24, 2008 5:40 pm

There are many different recipes Lockie, but here is one I found for you:


Rusks are hard, very dry biscuits, originally prepared in South Africa by the Dutch for traveling long distances in a hot climate. Rusks were a bread that wouldn't spoil. Now, all over South Africa, rusks are eaten as snacks, dipped in coffee, tea, or milk. In the cities, many different varieties of commercially baked rusks are available. There are raisin, chocolate chip, almond, peanut, and probably soon, oat-bran rusks.

* 2 cups unbleached white flour
* 2 cups whole wheat bread flour (coarsely ground if possible)
* 1/3 cup sugar
* 1/2 tsp salt
* 2 tsp baking powder
* 1 tsp cinnamon
* 1/2 cup melted butter
* 2 eggs
* 3/4 cup buttermilk
* 2 tsp pure vanilla extract
* 2 tsp pure almond extract

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. In a large mixing bowl, thoroughly mix the dry ingredients. Combine all the wet ingredients, pour them into the dry ingredients, and stir until you have a soft dough, similar to biscuit dough. Turn the dough onto a well-floured surface and roll or pat it to about a 1/2 inch thickness. Cut the dough into rectangles about 2 by 4 inches. Bake the rusks about 2 inches apart on buttered baking sheet for about 25 minutes until the tops are crisping and browning a little. Now, eat a few "soft" rusks warm from the oven. Loosely pile the rusks on a baking sheet and keep them in a 200 degree oven all day or all night (about 12 hours) to dry. The finished rusks should be very dry and hard. Cool and store in an airtight container. Rusks will keep for weeks.

VARIATIONS

Oatmeal-Raisin Rusks: Reduce the white flour to 1 1/2 cups and add 2 cups rolled oats and 1/2 cup currants or chopped raisins.

Almond Rusks: Add 1 cup chopped almonds and omit the cinnamon.

Peanut Rusks: Add 1 cup coarsely chopped peanuts.

Anise Rusks: Omit the cinnamon and almond extract and add 2 tsp pure anise extract or 1 Tbsp anisette.
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Re: All Recipes including Biltong & Potjie

Unread postby CuriousCanadian » Sun Oct 26, 2008 10:07 pm

How about broccoli & bacon salad? 8)
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Re: All Recipes including Biltong & Potjie

Unread postby rusky » Mon Oct 27, 2008 2:16 am

Pjw wrote:Lockie I think they were pm'd to rusky. Perhaps he can pm you the recipe he used?

Hye Lockie. Just saw this post. Did you get a Rusks recipie that you like (besides Jaz's). Also look up the "Rusks for Rusky thread"


or just pm me and i'll shoot you one. Maria is now regularly baking Rusks so I'm in seventh heaven. However I still miss the Woolworths special rusks.
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