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Unread postPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 10:00 am 
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Thanks again DQ !!

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Unread postPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 3:13 pm 
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DuQues wrote:
TIFF, JPG


I was too lazy to look at the chart, so didn't notice differing file types thrown into the mixture :oops: :lol:

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 Post subject: General Digital Advice Needed
Unread postPosted: Sun Apr 17, 2005 7:05 pm 
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I hope you experienced digital photographers can help me a bit.

First, I've been told that most/all digital cams have a (sometimes substantial) shutter delay, which I would find very frustrating when trying to capture a split-second moment or sighting.

Second, what about the auto-focus lenses, which I gather is what DSLRs use? Don't they also slow things down?

I've been using an Olympus OM-2S for years and while it has some semiautomatic features, I generally use it fully manual. Plus I now have two camera bodies, so I no longer have the frustration of always having the wrong lens fixed and no time to switch (why is it that it's always the wrong lens?!?).

While I see many advantages to going digital, I'm also wary of differences in operation that I may find frustrating. Advice?

thanks, arks


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Unread postPosted: Sun Apr 17, 2005 8:24 pm 
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Arks

Don't have the bandwidth to answer in detail, but....
DSLRs have no shutter delay - I have a Canon EOS-300D (Digital Rebel in the USA) and it's superb - I use it on fully auto - in the park, I have it on the "sports" mode which seems to give the best mix of shutter speed, depth-of-field (or lack thereof) and autofocus accuracy (see Madach's post about photographing birds in flight). I have also disabled the auto-switch-off function so whem I'm out, the camera is permanently ON - I have 3 batteries so no problems there.

As for lenses - I've taken just under 600 pics in the last week and never needed to change lens once - i use a Tamron 28-300mm lens (equivalent on a DSLR to about 50-480mm).

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2005 1:46 am 
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Thanks, Simon, for your advice, and for pointing me to Madach's most interesting post, which I was surprised (and a bit embarrassed) to find was sorta addresssed to me. I'm glad I found it as it's fascinating!

For some reason, this particular forum doesn't seem to resognise me when I enter it and doesn't flag the new threads or those that have posts I haven't read. I haven't encountered this in the few other forums I've visited (Kruger, and Animals etc) and wonder if any of the moderators know why this happens. (Suppose I should post this directly to the moderator).

Anyway, much thanks, arks


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 Post subject: Re: some digital camera questions
Unread postPosted: Wed Apr 20, 2005 9:36 am 
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arks wrote:
I hope you experienced digital photographers can help me a bit.

First, I've been told that most/all digital cams have a (sometimes substantial) shutter delay,

This was one of the reasons that kept me from going digital. My first digital Camera (FinePix 7000S) has a shutter delay of more than a quarter (0.37) of a second. No use when trying to take action shots. (What this little camera lacked in shutter response, it definitely made up in picture quality)

Referring to simonb6's post, - shutter delay on the 300D is only evident when shooting multiple frames (2.5 FPS). The reason for this is that the mirror moves up & down between frames. On models where one gets 10 FPS out of the camera, the mirror is locked up between takes. This eliminates "waiting-for-the-mirror-to-return- before-I-open-the-curtain-again"

Though the "burst reaction time" of humans is fairly high, one still needs a lot of practice to eventually successfully synchronize perceived action and shutter press. This is where multiple shots come in handy, predict the onset of action, press the shutter for a second or two, and with a bit of luck, the right moment is captured. When one speaks to professional photographers who have taken that single "wow"shot, they will admit that it comes off a strip of film containing before & after frames. Ever heard the roar of motor drives on Wimbledon just as Lendle is about to serve?

arks wrote:
Second, what about the auto-focus lenses, which I gather is what DSLRs use? Don't they also slow things down?[


Autofocus lenses are much quicker during moving action shots than manual focusing. AI servo functions on cameras may even increase the lens's auto focus functionality by "following-focusing"the moving object. In the beginning I also felt out of control by not be able to set the focus manually. Eventually I learned to trust the lens.

arks wrote:
While I see many advantages to going digital, I'm also wary of differences in operation that I may find frustrating. Advice?


Go for digital. (You eventually will) I can write a book to convince you. The advantages outweigh the cons by far.

*Burst reaction time amongst animals (and humans) is the time delay between perceived stimuli, cognitive translation in the brain, messaging from the brain to the body to react, and the body actually reacting.

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 Post subject: Re: some digital camera questions
Unread postPosted: Wed Apr 20, 2005 10:05 am 
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Lets make sure we are talking about the same things first; there are compact camera's and DSLR's.
Compact are, well, compact, and lens and body are one piece. They are reasonably priced.

DSLR are fairly big bodies with exchangeable lenses. They are not reasonably priced in comparison to the compacts. Body + Lens could cost you 24.000 rand, in an extreme case you can go up to 880.000 rand. Not bad for just one body and one lens is it?.

arks wrote:
First, I've been told that most/all digital cams have a (sometimes substantial) shutter delay, which I would find very frustrating when trying to capture a split-second moment or sighting.

Not quite true. Compact camera's have that, DSLR's have no delay whatsoever. With some compacts (Like Erwin pointed out) it is too much of a delay to be really workable, especially when shooting wildlife or young kids.

arks wrote:
Second, what about the auto-focus lenses, which I gather is what DSLRs use? Don't they also slow things down?

Auto focus (AF) is great. You don't have to worry about focus, the lens is in 99.9% of the time correct, so you can take the time to frame the photo. See the tutorial about shooting birds in flight, Madach would not even have tried with manual focus (MF).
Compacts always have auto focus, on a DSLR you have one or more focussing points. There is choice of AF or MF, but only on AF lenses. MF lenses, well you have to do the work yourself.

arks wrote:
While I see many advantages to going digital, I'm also wary of differences in operation that I may find frustrating.

Big question: What are you used to? If you are used to a SLR you will find the step to a DSLR very easy. Painting with light will stay that way no matter if you are using film or chips.

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 Post subject: Re: some digital camera questions
Unread postPosted: Wed Apr 20, 2005 6:28 pm 
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[quote="Erwin"][quote="arks"]Though the “burst reaction timeâ€Â


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 Post subject: Re: some digital camera questions
Unread postPosted: Wed Apr 20, 2005 6:37 pm 
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DuQues wrote:
Big question: What are you used to? If you are used to a SLR you will find the step to a DSLR very easy. Painting with light will stay that way no matter if you are using film or chips.


Thanks, DQ, for addressing the differences between DSLR and point-and-shoot. This info is very helpful indeed.

As for what I'm used to, I've been using an Olympus OM-2S for years and while it has some semiautomatic features, I generally use it fully manual. Plus I now have two camera bodies, so I no longer have the frustration of always having the wrong lens fixed and no time to switch (why is it that it's always the wrong lens?!?). I also have a nice little Olympus Stylus Epic point and shoot (no zoom) and an Ansco point and shootpanoramic camera, which doesn't have great quality but takes true wide-format panorama pix, which are really nice to have for certain things.

Problem now is that I've waited so long that I'm going to want to upgrade everything - plus I really also want to add video. And it's bad enough me all alone in the car with 2 SLRs, the point and shoot and the panoramic cam. Now I want to add another cam to juggle?!?

I really appreciate all the feedback in this forum as once I've sorted through the overload of terrific information, I'll be able to make decisions I'm likely to be happy with.

cheers, arks


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2005 3:02 pm 
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First a bit of general information I just ran across:
(...)The Times Online Guide to Digital Photography, produced in association with Sony Ericsson. Although an increasing number of us are opting for the flexibility of electronic imaging over traditional film, many are still daunted by the complexity of the new medium - and as a result are often unaware of its full capability.
In this site, we seek to demystify digital cameras and provide a concise reference guide that will help you get more out of the medium. (...)
That "concise reference guide" can be found here.

@Arks, Francoisd has posted an article about the latest Nikon and Canon camera's. That might interest you if you don't have a lot of lenses for your Olympus. Find it here.

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2005 3:13 pm 
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DuQues wrote:
First a bit of general information I just ran across:
(...)The Times Online Guide to Digital Photography, produced in association with Sony Ericsson. Although an increasing number of us are opting for the flexibility of electronic imaging over traditional film, many are still daunted by the complexity of the new medium - and as a result are often unaware of its full capability.
In this site, we seek to demystify digital cameras and provide a concise reference guide that will help you get more out of the medium. (...)
That "concise reference guide" can be found here.

@Arks, Francoisd has posted an article about the latest Nikon and Canon camera's. That might interest you if you don't have a lot of lenses for your Olympus. Find it here.


Thnaks, DQ. I'd just read the article Francois posted and then I found this reply from you, so I'll go have a look now. Many thanks!!

Also, my Olympus lenses are probably no good for a DSLR because they aren't AF lenses. I've really going to be technologically challenged here!! But all the help and pointers I'm getting here will make my transition that much smoother.

Thanks!! arks


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 Post subject: Real beginner stuff
Unread postPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2005 5:50 pm 
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I do feel intimidated by a lot of thechno data.
I appreciate what I see on the forums. Some of the photography is truly awesome. I could look at it all day :wink:
For me, step one... where to start, what camera to buy. On my recent trip I was the only one without a camera. I have had so many chopped off heads or feet that over the years that I have lost any confidence I might have had.
I am not a very visual person, so I struggle with some of the basics. I do however appreciate a good picture and can see exactly why it is good.
As a result of my thechno phobia, I lost some amazing moments.

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 Post subject: Re: Real beginner stuff
Unread postPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2005 6:02 pm 
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macho mouse wrote:
For me, step one... where to start, what camera to buy.

Step 1 is a technological one, but makes it less costly: buy a digital camera. That way if you have chopped off heads, arms, legs it does not cost money. Delete and shoot again. And again, till you have trained yourself to look at your composition before you click the button.
It may actually be best if you get yourself a cheapo digital one (second hand?) and a tripod. The tripod will force you to look at your composition before you shoot.

While you are practising you will find out what you prefer to photograph. That means you will find out what lens(es) you will need, and then the real fun starts.

What brand, what lens(es), and worst: which mortgage?

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2005 7:00 pm 
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Don't be intimidated, MM :D . I do a lot of photography, but have little interest in the techie side of things. I've worked out for myself what camera(s) I need to get the results that I want and how to use them.

DQ's advice is excellent. With a simple digital camera, you don't have the expense of lots of "mistakes" on film. Rather, you can see what you've done wrong immediately and in most cases then make the needed corrections.

I say ignore as much of the techie side of things as possible (you will find that you can understand what you need to) and figure out what works for you. And you can start easily with trying to photograph your cats (impossible, trust me) and dogs and birds in your garden â€â€

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2005 7:36 pm 
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Hi MM,

I strongly recommend that you start by looking at the Fuji Finepix 5500. This camera has a 10x optical zoom, which is almost mandatory for wildlife esp bird shots.
It sells for about three grand, but is worth every cent.

There are upward comparative cameras in price, strength and definition.

We have had our FF 5000 (the earlier model) now for 2 years and are pleased we bought it. If we had R100 for each recommendation bought by others, we could probably have had a free one by now.

Do not short change yourself. It is a 5 year investment. If you go for 3x zoom you might as well stick to portraits.

Good hunting,
BB.

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