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 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 11:25 pm 
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Hey Charbel, awesome sightings with awesome pics!

Love the Impala lams, they are beautiful! Love the birds and the info, really like learning about them!

You are a busy man, enjoy Sweden, my brother lives there and I heard the weather is great: rain and snow around 0 degrees!

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 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 12:30 am 
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Hi Hilda and Super Mongoose,

Hilda, so we were quite lucky to see the woodland kingfishers so late, in January, and we saw than, as far as I remember, three times, in very different parts of KNP.

Super Mongoose, yes here in Sweden the weather is exactly like that... I travelled today from Karlstad to Stockholm, where I am about to sleep, to take the plane in the early morning to Valencia, Spain, where I am attending a meeting.... yes, traveling to work is part of the job, I do enjoy, but sometimes is very tiring. This trip, in particular, has been up to now very enjoyable. And after the meeting, I have a great dessert, three days in Doñana, the national park South of Spain.... Never been there, it seems great, I will tell you all if it is worth going. As it is winter here, I wlll not see the African birds, they are there in the summer in Europe, but I will probably see the nordic birds down there... let's see....

Cheers
Charbel


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 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 9:58 am 
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Hey Charbel

Glad you going to Spain, it's a bit warmer there...and lucky to go to there national park! Yes please tel us what they have!

Enjoy your traveling!

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 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Sat Dec 08, 2012 7:52 pm 
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Hi friends,
Well, I am back from Spain and the first week after the travel was hell, with a lot of delayed work to do. That's why I disappeared.

Let me tell you that Doñana is really great. It is natural park and a national park combined, in between farms and cities, so nothing similar to KNP or KTP. But it does have a great diversity of birds. I saw 92 species in 2.5 days. Not bad at all. Here is the list of what I saw:

Birds
1. Black-necked grebe (Podiceps nigricollis)
2. Little Grebe (Tachybaptus ruficollis)
3. Great Crested Grebe (Podiceps cristatus).
4. Greylag Goose (Anser anser).
5. Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos).
6. Eurasian Teal (Anas crecca).
7. Northern Pintail (Anas acuta).
8. Northern Shoveler (Anas clypeata).
9. Marbled Teal (Marmaronetta angustirostris.
10. Red-Crested Pochard (Netta rufina).
11. Pochard (Aythya ferina).
12. Ferruginous Duck (Aythya nyroca).
13. Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis).
14. Little Egret (Egretta garzetta).
15. Great White Egret (Egretta alba).
16. Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea).
17. Black Crowned Night Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax).
18. Eurasian Spoonbill (Platelea leucordia).
19. White Stork (Ciconia ciconia).
20. Black Stork (Ciconia negra).
21. Glossy Ibis (Piegadis falcinellus).
22. Greater Flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber).
23. Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo).
24. Northern Gannet (Morus bassanus).
25. Black-Headed Gull (Larus rudibundus).
26. Yellow-Legged Gull (Larus cachinnans).
27. Lesser Black-Backed Gull (Larus fuscus).
28. Osprey (Pandion haliaetus).
29. Red Kite (Milvus milvus).
30. Black-Winged Kite (Elanus caeruleus).
31. Marsh Harrier (Circus aeruginosus).
32. Hen Harrier (Circus cyaneus).
33. Common Buzzard (Buteo buteo).
34. Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus).
35. Booted Eagle (Hieraaetus pennatus).
36. Spanish Imperial Eagle (Aquila helíaca adalberti).
37. Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus).
38. Common Kestrel (Falco tinnunculus).
39. Moorhen (Gallinula chrolopus).
40. Purple Swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio).
41. Coot (Fulica atra).
42. Crested Coot (Fulica cristata).
43. Crane (Grus grus).
44. Black-Winged Stilt (Himantopus himantopus).
45. Little Ringed Plover (Charadrius dubius).
46. Golden Plover (Pluvialis apricaria).
47. Lapwing (Vanellus vanellus).
48. Ruff (Philomachus pugnax).
49. Snipe (Gallinago gallinago).
50. Black-Tailed Godwit (Limosa limosa).
51. Greenshank (Tringa nebularia).
52. Green Sandpiper (Tringa ochropus).
53. Rock Dove/Feral Pigeon (Columba livia).
54. Woodpigeon (Columba palumbus).
55. Collared Dove (Streptopelia decaocto).
56. European Kingfisher (Alcedo athis).
57. Hoopoe (Upupa epops).
58. Woodlark (Lullula arborea).
59. Skylark (Alauda arvensis).
60. Crested Lark (Gallerida cristata).
61. Calandra Lark (Melanocorypha calandra).
62. House Martin (Delichon urbica).
63. Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica).
64. Meadow Pipit (Anthus pratensis).
65. White Wagtail (Motacilla alba).
66. Grey Wagtail (Motacilla cinerea).
67. Robin (Erithacus rubecula).
68. Black Redstart (Pheonicrurus ochruros).
69. Stonechat (Saxicola torquata).
70. Blackbird (Turdus merula).
71. Song Thrush (Turdus philomelos).
72. Blackcap (Sylvia atricapilla).
73. Sardinian Warbler (Sylvia melanocephala).
74. Dartford Warbler (Sylvia undata).
75. Chiffchaff (Phylloscopus collybita).
76. Great Tit (Parus major).
77. Southern Grey Shrike (Lanius excubitor).
78. European Magpie (Pica pica).
79. Iberian Azure-Winged Magpie (Cyanopica cyana).
80. Jackdaw (Corvus monedula).
81. Raven (Corvus corax).
82. Spotless Starling (Sturnus unicolor).
83. Spanish Sparrow (Passer hispaniolensis).
84. House Sparrow (Passer domesticus).
85. Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus).
86. Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs).
87. Serin (Serinus serinus).
88. Linnet (Carduelis cannabina).
89. Goldfinch (Carduelis carduelis).
90. Greenfinch (Carduelis chloris).
91. Corn Bunting (Miliaria calandra).
92. Short-eared Owl (Asio flammeus).

Mammals
1. Fallow Deer (Dama dama).
2. Red Deer (Cervus elaphus).

And just through the monitors of the conservation center:
Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus).

Cheers
Charbel

1 June 2013 - Twee Rivieren
2 June 2013 - Kieliekrankie
3-4 June 2013 - Kalahari Tented Camp
5 June 2013 - Twee Rivieren
6-8 June 2013 - Nossob
9 June 2013 - Gharagab
10 June 2013 - Grootkolk
11 June 2013 - Nossob
12 June 2013 - Twee Rivieren


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 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2012 11:24 am 
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A very impressive list Charbel! That is fantastic! :clap: :clap:

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 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Mon Dec 10, 2012 1:45 am 
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yes Hilda, it was great.
It is a pity I discovered my camera was broken just some days before the trip, and thus no pictures this time,just movies with the videocamera...

Cheers
Charbel


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 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2012 6:10 pm 
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Hi friends,
After the trip to Doñana, in Andalucia, South Spain, time was hectic in the university, with the huge burden of work. So, sorry for the delay, and I hope at least some of you are still with me in the TR. I am still in Jan 6th 2011 going north in KNP, from Skukuza to Orpen.

Tshokwane was a very pleasant picnic stop, where we could rest for a while, stretch our legs and eat something. You took at this place one of the most fantastic pictures in the whole trip, but I will not reproduce here because it shows people whose permission I cannot ask for, because I do not know who they are. But I will describe the picture. There were two African Mourning Doves (Streptopelia decipiens) perched on the top of a chair, just besides where a mother was giving food to her daughter. The baby girl was pointed with her finger to the doves, and we took the picture of this exact moment of a child fascinated with animal life at such a young age! It was a great moment captured on photograph.

Besides the doves, we just saw in Tshokwane 1 Cape Glossy Starling (Lamprotornis nitens) and a female House Sparrow (Passer domesticus). About the latter, I will just say that they are an invasive species originated from Eurasia, which was introduced to Australasia, the Americas and Africa, becoming the bird with the largest world distribution. In Brazil, they were introduced in 1903 by the mayor of Rio de Janeiro, using birds from Portugal, where they were previously introduced. Yes, no worry about bioinvasion back then! They had an impact over Brazilian birds, through competition and nest parasitism. In Africa, I read that they had minor impact on indigenous birds, despite their abundance. They may have displaced, however, Cape wagtails from urban areas.

Here is a close picture of an African Mourning Dove.

Image

In Xenocanto, you can find several recordings of the calls and songs of this dove, and some of them will illuminate why one thinks of sadness when listening to them. I think this is indeed an evocative bird, very inwardly directed in my experience. Here is the link: http://www.xeno-canto.org/browse.php?sp ... +decipiens

The IUCN Red List tells us, however, that we should not feel sad for this bird, at least up to the present. Least concern with stable populations. This bird is also widely distributed in Africa, as you can see here: http://maps.iucnredlist.org/map.html?id=106002504

It is a resident bird south of Sahara, being more abundant near water. It does not show much sexual dimorphism. It eats grass seeds, grains and other vegetation, with very small amounts of fruits and insects, usually foraging on the ground. It is also quite gregarious and often feed in groups, something not common in the Streptopelia genus.

Although it is widespread in other parts of Africa, it is found only in small areas in the northern half of southern Africa.

The Cape Glossy Starling was quite a common bird, especially while we were in the south part of the park. Even though it did not raise our eagerness to photograph as much as other common birds, such as the European Roller, it also deserves its space here. Besides, this is a nice picture, worth reproducing here.

Image

Only one recording for this bird in Xenocanto, from the Berg-en-Dal camp! http://www.xeno-canto.org/browse.php?sp ... nis+nitens

In the IUCN Red List, also Least Concern with stable populations. This is a resident bird of Southern Africa: http://maps.iucnredlist.org/map.html?id=106006775

It is a locally common bird across much of the region, excluding central Mozambique, the Karoo, Namibian Desert and the fynbos biome in the Western Cape. We can find it in a variety of different habitats, especially wooded savanna, forest edges, riverine bush, plantations, parks and gardens.

Brood parasites, such as the Greater and the Lesser Honeyguides, and the Great Spotted Cuckoo, explore their nests.

It eats insects, fruit, nectar and scraps of human food. Most of the foraging is done on the ground, running and hopping in search of food. It is often found alongside with antelope, removing ectoparasites from them as well as catching the insects they disturb.

I will come back in some minutes with a posting for the first half of the Tshokwane-Satara Road (H1-3).


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 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2012 6:20 pm 
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After Tshokwane, we hit the road again! We still had much travel to do until reaching Orpen, where we would check-in for Tamboti. The next step was the Tshokwane-Satara Road (H1-3), where we saw: 1 male Kudu, 2 Yellow-Billed Kites flying (Milvus aegyptius), 3 female Kudus, one big group of Impalas alongside with 1 Blue Wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus), 1 juvenile female Red-backed Shrike (Lanius collurio), 2 European Rollers, 1 Southern Carmine Bee-Eater (Merops nubicoides), 1 Magpie (African Longtailed) Shrike (Corvinella melanoleuca), 1 African Grey Hornbill (Tockus nasutus), 1 male Waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus), 4 White-Faced Ducks (Dendrocygna viduata), 2 Ruffs (Philomachus pugnax), 1 African Elephant, 6 Burchell’s Zebras, 1 swarm of African Openbill (Openbilled Stork) (Anastomus lamelligerus), 4 (African) White-Backed Vultures (Gyps africanus), and
1 Bateleur flying (Terathopius ecaudatus). It was a busy road!

The encounter with this male Kudu was almost a mystical experience. He stared us in the face and we could see with the closest possible eye how impressive are the ornaments in his face. He looked like an old wise guy, staring at us from the highness of his experience.

Image

In full body, it is possible to see what an impressive male he was!

Image

After reaching some conclusion about us, he simply moved away.

Image

Later we found these gorgeous Kudu ladies, not so far away from the male, forming a small herd, as it is usual of female Kudus (males are mainly solitary). Look how charming one of the ladies was.

Image

Kudus do not have a large distribution area in South Africa, as we can see in this distribution map: http://maps.iucnredlist.org/map.html?id=22054

Anyway, they have a large distribution in Africa and are not threatened, classified in the IUCN Red List as Least Concern with stable populations, differently from the Lesser Kudu (Tragephalus imberbis), which is near threatened. This species is not found in southern Africa, however. Anyway, the Greater Kudu suffers the impact of habitat loss and hunting. Next time I go to South Africa I guess I will not eat Kudu again.

We also managed to photograph two Yellow-Billed Kites flying over the Tshokwane-Satara Road. Here is a picture of one of them. It was cropped from a more distant picture.

Image

Unfortunately, this species was not accessed yet by the IUCN. In other sources, I found the information that it is not threatened, but this is not so reliable as the IUCN evaluation.

This species occurs across sub-Saharan Africa, and in southern Africa is common across a large part of the region, largely excluding the Karoo, Kahalari and Namibian Desert. It can be found in a wide variety of habitats, with a preference for woodland and rural areas (with large human populations). It is an intra-African breeding migrant. It arrives in southern Africa from August to October and departs in March.

Its feeding includes a wide variety of animals, including birds, rodents, lizards, frogs, fishes (only in shallow water), mollusks, crustaceans, and insects. It flies in the manner characteristic of kites, swiveling the tail horizontally to steer accurately. When a prey is spotted, it swoops to the ground rapidly to catch it.

The entirely yellow bill differentiates this bird from the Black Kite (Milvus migrans). For a long time, these two kites were considered as belonging to the same species, but recent DNA studies suggested that the Yellow-billed Kite differs significantly from Black Kites and should be considered as a separate species (Jeff A. Johnson, Richard T. Watson and David P. Mindell (2005) Prioritizing species conservation: does the Cape Verde kite exist? Proc. R. Soc. B 272: 1365–1371). This paper illustrates how discussions about the species concept and the status of species are relevant for conservation. As the resources for conservation are limited, the decision to prioritize the conservation of a subspecies is very unlikely. Thus, to establish whether a given animal is truly a species or not becomes relevant for conservation. Nevertheless, the whole issue gets more complicated given the polemics around what are species. But this also makes the whole issue more interesting (for a discussion about this problem, see Sterelny, K. & Griffiths, P. 1999. Sex and Death: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Biology).

There are two subspecies of the Yellow-Billed Kite: M. a. parasitus, found throughout most of the sub-Saharan Africa (including Madagascar), with the exception of the Congo Basin. This is the subspecies we saw in KNP. M. a. aegyptius, in turn, is found in Egypt, southwest Arabia and the Somali peninsula.

As I told you, we could never get tired of European Roller for the first half of the trip. Pedro and Carol got tired eventually. Me never. Here is another one.

Image

Even though they were so common in KNP, it is a pity to know that they are Near Threatened, with decreasing populations, as the IUCN Red List informs us. Most of the threats comes from pollution and hunting.

Here is the distribution of the European Roller: http://maps.iucnredlist.org/map.html?id=106001033

They come to Africa in the non-breeding season, in Summer in the South Hemisphere, while they breed in Europe and Asia (in Summer in the North Hemisphere).

To finish this posting, an African Grey Hornbill hidden in the foliage.

Image

This is classified as Least Concern by the IUCN. KNP is one of the few places in South Africa where we can find them: http://maps.iucnredlist.org/map.html?id=100600941

The subspecies we find in South Africa is T. n. epirhinus. Here are some recordings of their calls: http://www.xeno-canto.org/species/Tockus-nasutus

Quite nice calls!

I will send this posting now and come back later to continue with the Tshokwane-Satara Road.

Cheers
Charbel

1 June 2013 - Twee Rivieren
2 June 2013 - Kieliekrankie
3-4 June 2013 - Kalahari Tented Camp
5 June 2013 - Twee Rivieren
6-8 June 2013 - Nossob
9 June 2013 - Gharagab
10 June 2013 - Grootkolk
11 June 2013 - Nossob
12 June 2013 - Twee Rivieren


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 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2012 6:41 pm 
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:clap: Hi Charbel, nice to see you are still around :wink:

8) Stunning "Bird list", 92 (wow) :clap:

:mrgreen: Great pics and story of your adventure :mrgreen: Thank you :great: :great:

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 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 11:26 am 
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Glad to have read another episode of your trip Charbel! Very informative with nice pictures! :clap: :clap:

That is a very impressive Kudu bull! What a beautiful animal! :dance: :dance:

Great pictures of the European Roller and Grey Hornbill too! :thumbs_up:

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 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 12:04 pm 
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:thumbs_up: Hi Charbel

So glad I found this amazing TR again. Just love all the photos, but most of all - all the valuable info.

I am on board :popcorn:

Leana


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 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 11:57 pm 
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Hi Leanawel, Hilda and Philip,
Thanks for the comments and support. I plan to make another posting this week!

It was indeed a stunning Kudu bull, so glad we saw it!

About the 92 species of birds I saw in Doñana, just knew from our students in one of the projects I am involved, in which a guide for the books in the university campus here is being produced, that they found 90 species of birds here, around our buildings, in the very middle of a 3.5 million inhabitants... Tropical diversity is always amazing!

Cheers
Charbel


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 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2012 5:27 am 
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:clap: Wonderful TR -so glad I have just found it and didn't have to wait for the instalments! Just a warning though about Kgalagadi - it will be VERY cold there in June and you must remember to pack lots of warm clothes,gloves,beanies,etc. I see you have not included Urikaruus in your itinerary -it is a wonderful camp if you can manage to fit it in. If you don't mind being chilly you will LOVE KTP :dance:


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 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2012 5:46 am 
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Charbel, I love your Mourning Dove close up 8) . They are beautiful birds seldom appreciated. I appreciate your ability to have a wonder for everything. :thumbs_up:

:popcorn:

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 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Sat Dec 22, 2012 11:08 pm 
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Hi Meandering Mouse,
Thanks for your nice words. It is impossible not to be amazed by any life form so beautiful!

Pamelajane,
Thanks. I do fear the chilly weather in KTP, but I already bought a lot of clothes for cold weather, I hope I am prepared...

I am glad you liked the TR! I plan to do another posting soon, if possible, today!

Cheers
Charbel


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