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 Post subject: Chip After 64 years...wait for it...my first TR Nov 2010
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 22, 2010 5:04 pm 
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My SO, sister and brother-in-law and I have just returned from 14 days visit
to the lowveld and although we didn't stay in Kruger, we were ten minutes away from Croc. Bridge for 1 week and ten minutes away from Phabeni and Numbi gates and 30 minutes from Kruger gate for the second week. Apart from 2 days when it rained all day, we were in the park everyday.

Now, here's the rub!!!!!! I have decided to submit a report B U T haven't a clue how to submit the report and pics and will be relying heavily on my son, GlenD, to help me when he has the time.

So hang in there, things could be getting nasty shortly :twisted:

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 Post subject: Re: After 64 years.........wait for it......my first trip report
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 22, 2010 8:25 pm 
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Okie, you got it wrong there! I have been going to Kruger since 1946, 64 years ago. It was a memorable year because it coincided with the retirement of Col. Stevenson-Hamilton and also Harry Wolhuter.

Rooies, yes, I want to include some old camp pics for comparison purposes. At Lower Sabie, I stood in the same place as I suspect the old photo was taken. What a difference. At Skukuza, they seemed to frown on the idea that I take a pic from the Selati railway bridge, showing the front of the old camp (don't know why) and so I had to take it from the electric fence. :cam:

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 Post subject: Re: After 64 years.........wait for it......my first trip report
Unread postPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2010 9:05 am 
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Having had two glorious relaxing weeks in paradise, I appear to be under so much pressure now, having started something here! It's great! I love it! :dance:

Seriously though, thanks for all the response so far. I hope it pans out OK. I have serious doubts about my pics though as, when I see some of the fantastic pics on other TRs, I assure you that mine are not in the same league.

Therefore, as Michelle the resistance fighter in 'Allo 'Allo (BBC) always says, "Listen carefully because I will only say this once", I apologise now for any inferior pics. I will be choosing the best pics from all those taken between us. None of us has a fancy camera with a lens as long as my arm, that can identify and name each tick on an impala's bum.

GlenD is under pressure at work with year end projects that have to be completed and will be helping with the uploads as soon as he can.

In the meantime, if you like, I will mention what the park looked like through my eyes in the 40s :shock:

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 Post subject: Re: After 64 years.........wait for it......my first trip report
Unread postPosted: Thu Nov 25, 2010 12:19 pm 
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Hi there, I am back!
Between GlenD and also Sylvia.C who gave me advice on how to upload webcam pics more than a year ago, I think I have cracked the secret.

I had an op yesterday to remove a melanoma and my brother-in-law, Brian, who was on the trip, was taken to hospital yesterday afternoon with problems and is to have tests done today to find out exactly what the problem is. I mention these as it may delay getting some of the pics for the TR.

In the meantime, let me start by explaining what the 64 years is all about. I know that I have posted elsewhere how we got to Kruger for the first time, but briefly I will mention it again.

In 1946 my dad didn't own a car and friends of the family, an elderly couple, took us to Lourenco Marques (Maputo) for a while and on the way back, we entered Kruger at Crocodile Bridge gate and stayed a few days in the park.

We were six in the family at that time as can be seen in this pic.
Image
No prize guessing where I fitted in. I am the little guy in the front and my sister, Jen, who was also on the current trip, was next to me. Cute hey!!!!!
Our elderly friends had a huge pre second world war car (not sure of the make) and they sat in the front and the six of us had to make the best of the back seat. I had to stand on the seat most of the time and when I fell asleep, I slept standing up or they would place me in the back windowsill. THE KRUGER BUG CAUGHT US ON THAT TRIP and we have visited the park just about every year since then, and at times 2, 3 or 4 times in the year.

To be continued...............................

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Last edited by Chip on Thu Nov 25, 2010 1:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: After 64 years.........wait for it......my first trip report
Unread postPosted: Thu Nov 25, 2010 9:06 pm 
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Episode 2 will cover a few changes that have occurred in Kruger since the good old days, with a few pics of camps and how they have changed. Will be posting this tomorrow so put the coffee on
Image and have a good Image

'Till tomorrow, nity-nite

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Next visit to Kruger 17 Aug to 22 Aug at Crocodile Bridge
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Last edited by Chip on Fri Nov 26, 2010 9:07 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: After 64 years.........wait for it......my first trip report
Unread postPosted: Fri Nov 26, 2010 1:22 pm 
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Episode 2 - The early days, as seen through my young eyes


A year or two after our first visit, my dad bought his first motor car. YEH! :dance: It was an old Plymouth of pre second world war vintage. It battled to get up hills and we had to get out and push every now and again. BUT, it was O U R car and we were very proud of it. However, after a very short time, my dad decided that it was not the ideal car for us and so he bought another Plymouth, also of pre second world war make, but this time there was never a need to push.

The cars in those days had bench type seats in front and so the six of us fitted in quite well. There was a problem though.
Window seats were not available for all, naturally and two bodies always had to sit 'in the middle', either front or back. There were very strict rules made in our car. Boy-O-boy, or should I be politically correct and say Person-O-person, (doesn't sound as good), if you were at a window seat and you spotted something in the road, or out of someone elses window, there was a big family argument which was seldom if ever resolved.
If you happened to miss spotting something out your window, you were liable to loose your window seat and be demoted to a middle seat. I was the youngest and liked to sit in front between my mom and dad. My dad had a little bench made and I sat on this. I also qualified to look out the front window to see if anything was in the road. (This was a lot easier than scrutinising what was behind each tree and bush)

The trips in those days were so different from nowadays.

There were shops in some of the camps but they sold very little except tinned food. Fresh eggs, milk, butter, vegetables, meat were not available and therefore trips were shorter as you had to take all provisions with you. There was no refridgeration at all.

The park was not open throughout the year and only a few camps in the South were open. Staff working in the other camps only worked for about 6 months and then had to leave until the next season.

Mr. Saunderson who took over from Col. Stevenson-Hamilton in 1946 reintroduced the killing of predators as he felt that the park needed more game for it to become viable. As a result of this, we very seldom saw lions or leopards and I was about 14 before we saw our first cheetah.

Things that have changed since I first went to Kruger are:

1) A number of camps have disappeared and new ones have popped up. From North to South camps that have gone are Malopene. This was a gate camp and had 15 beds. You could get petrol and oil and nothing else. To get to Malopene, you had to ride on a disgusting, poorly maintained gravel road through Gravellote (name says it all) , Leydsdorp before reaching Kruger.
On a trip with my aunt & uncle once, it was about midday. My aunt was asleep in the back, I was asleep in the passenger seat and my uncle was asleep while driving. Well, you can imagine what happened next.
Flying through bushes, bouncing along soon woke us all up. My uncle had to walk around for quite a while to recover from the shock. To make matters worse, there was a skull of some cow who had snuffed it, in a tree, close by where we had stopped. (The cow didn't snuff it in the tree. Let me explain - The skull must have been put there - just had to clear that up before you started doubting my story)

Gorge has disappeared. It was a very small camp with only 23 beds. Nothing else. I believe the Olifant's trail starts from that area now.

Olifantsrivier is still there but has had a name change to Balule. More on this camp just now.

Rabelais has gone. This was a small gate camp that had 20 beds. Petrol and oil were available as it was a gate camp.

Nwanetsi, that was one big cottage that had 8 beds, has disappeared.

Those are the camps that have gone. I will continue just now with those that have been built later on.

To be continued...........................

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 Post subject: Re: After 64 years.........wait for it......my first trip report
Unread postPosted: Fri Nov 26, 2010 3:12 pm 
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Episode 2 continued

(Hope this isn't too boring)

Camps that have been built in the last 30/40 years are:
Sirheni
Bateleur
Mopani
Tsendze
Boulders
Shimuwini
Olifants
Roodewal
Orpen, Maroela & Tamboti
Talamati
Biyamiti
Ber-en-dal.

I have not included any of the concessions in this list.

2) Gates that have closed are:
Malelane (Let me explain) Malelane used to be a gate camp supplying petrol & oil and it also had a restaurant. It was made into a private camp later when the new Malelane gate was opened.
Rabelais - This was also a gate camp that 'died' when additional land donated by the Orpen family was included in Kruger.
Malopene - The same fate as Rabelais, this time because Phalaborwa jumped onto the map and the old S131 had to take an urgent bend to the left, close to the western border, so that the road could come out at the new town.

3) Gates that have opened are:
Malelane (already discussed)
Phabeni
Paul Kruger
Orpen (byebye Rabelais)
Phalaborwa (totsiens or goodbye Malopene)
Pafuri
Pafuri border post
Giriyondo border post

4) All the camps have changed tremendously over the last half century, all for the better. Sanparks is to be congratulated on all improvements made, as they are IMPROVEMENTS.
Imagine Letaba and the scene today as you look, facing the river and then turn to your right.
Beautiful trees, well watered grass, huts set back from the river. OK. Do you all see the pic.?
Now, let's take you back a while'
Image

Quite different. First of all came the hut accommodation, further down the line were block type huts that had about two rooms and after that came the tents. (and there were many tents. All square, each had 2 or 3 beds, a pottie or two, 2 hurricane lamps, a green metal table and some chairs, as in the picture)

Remember being booked in at Lower Sabie and finding that you were in the dormitary section at the camp. I think that if they knew you had kids, that's where you went.

Then

Image

and now

Image

Same buildings but in such a great setting.

At Skukuza, during the early days, we used to play on the rocks just below the Selati railway bridge. There was a pathway down from where huts 217 - 221 of today are. Nobody ever thought about lions, leopards or anything that may have wanted to eat you.

Image

Pictures taken last week from the fence show how things have changed. I don't know why they wouldn't let me climb onto the bridge to take pics for comparison but anyhow..........

Image

Image

To be continued........................

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 Post subject: Re: After 64 years.........wait for it......my first trip report
Unread postPosted: Fri Nov 26, 2010 7:06 pm 
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Episode 2 continued

I will finish off with just a few memories of the early days, as I don't believe in pushing it for too long.

One incident I remember as a young boy was when we were staying at Skukuza. We met relatives along one of the roads. They were staying at Lower Sabie. My dad invited them back to lunch and then had to turn the car around and fly back to our camp to prepare lunch for our visitors. It meant opening up tins of baked beans, sweetcorn, corned beef.............you know the story, when you don't have anything fresh.
In his haste, while opening one of the tins, he nearly cut two of his fingers clean off. He was really in a bad way. Luckily we were friends of Van (Mr. H van der Veen, who was the first hospitality/catering manager in Kruger. (Don't remember his exact title) One of the family rushed to call him and he fortunately was able to tell us where to find a doctor who was staying in Skukuza at the time. We took my dad to this guy who got some of his wife's sewing cotton and stitched him up. To his dying day, he was unable to use those fingers properly, but thanks to the doctor and Van of course, he didn't lose them.
I'm not sure whether the visitors got any lunch, come to think of it.Image

Another incident that was very :redface: :redface: :redface: was when we were staying at Satara. Now in those days there was only the road from Satara to Rabelais. There was no S40, S39, S12, S100. So let's call it the H7 (as it is called today) The road to Nwanetsi camp was a combination of the S100 and the H6. From Satara you travelled for maybe 5 kms along the S100. Then it crossed over Nwanetsi river, if there was no water in it, and the road met up with the H6, that took you to Nwanetsi (Old spelling Ngwanetsi). You didn't follow the river at all. As a matter of fact, the first time anyone in our family ever saw a cheetah was on that road.
But I am off the subject again.
The dam at Nsemani was only built when the H7 was tarred. Before that, visitors used to go out in the afternoon and sit at a little waterhole about 8 kms from Satara on the H7. That waterhole is still there but you have to go around the little road just after the dam to see it. Today there is a reservoir and a water trough as well, but below the trough is the waterhole I am referring to.
Are you all totally lost now?
The H7 from Satara turned at the S40, went up for a short while just past the waterhole and then turned back to the H7 and carried on to Rabelais. :cam: Got the picture?
Well, one afternoon, we travelled along the corrugated gravel road to the waterhole that had already a number of cars whose occupants were sitting quietly anticipating the best sighting of their holidays.
As we got there, the chrome hooter on the steering wheel said in no uncertain terms that it had had enough of the corrugations. The hooter started blasting away and wouldn't stop for love or money. :redface: :redface: Well, with everyone swearing at us, we had to hightail it back to Satara with trumpets blowing. Only when we got there, were we able to disconnect the hooter from the battery and let peace descend on the lowveld once more.
By the way, the entrance to Satara was on the other end from where it is now. You could say that the gate was more or less where the exit is to the staff compound. The gate was therefore on the West side of the camp. As you came in the gate, you passed the petrol pumps like this one, that is to be found at Skukuza
Image
The poor old petrol attendant had to pump gallon after gallon of petrol into your car by hand, arm and anything else he wanted to use.
After the petrol pumps, you came upon a large old acacia umbrella tree. It really was large and tables and chairs were placed under the tree and tea and scones were served there. As with anywhere else, you had to fight starlings and weaver birds while trying to look civilised and posh.
Another interesting thing of note was that in the early days, water was a very scarce commodity at Satara. There was no perennial water course near Satara and when you went into the ablution block, there were always signs pleading for visitors to use the water sparingly.
This problem was overcome when a pipe was laid and water pumped from the Olifants river.

I think one more story and then we will start the current trip report.

At my sister Jen's wedding reception, my uncle, who often took me to Kruger with my aunt and after she died, the two of us went together, said to me that I had better choose a wife who loved the Kruger Park as I did or else I would have a problem.
That was not a problem, as I took my then girlfriend to the park and we were booked in at Malelane for the first few days.
In those days, there were no proper toilets and when she needed the loo, I showed her to the long drops (a deep hole in the ground with a toilet covering it. Chemicals broke the goods up with a certain amount of smell. There was a splitpole fence around the entrance to these loos ) Well, in no uncertain terms she told me what she thought of the loos. However, nature took it's course and she reluctantly tried them out. Each time she wanted to go and if it was during the night, she would come and call me and I would have to accompany her to the loos away from the huts.
She eventually got used to the idea and became a staunch Kruger park enthusiast. Having thus qualified, I asked her to marry me and, luckily for me, she accepted. Unfortunately she died in 2003.

I have some photos of Malelane camp taken about 27 years ago that can be compared to the camp we went to the other week to visit echo junkie.

Then

Image
Image

and now, taken on a tour of Malelane with Jenni.

Image

In the first of the old pics are the 2 rooms that we occupied on that first visit of my late wife.

Well, I think that that is enough of the old days for a while.

Episode 3 will get us into Kruger on 6 November 2010.

Until then, niti-nite. Sweet dreams of Kruger, my farm in the lowveld.Image

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 Post subject: Re: After 64 years.........wait for it......my first trip report
Unread postPosted: Sat Nov 27, 2010 10:46 am 
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CuriousCanadian & anne-catherine, thanks for your comments.

Yes, the old days were really special and I miss some of the things that have gone forever. Braaing meat, for instance, when one of the staff would chop off some coals from an old leadwood log that had been burning all day and night and with a shovel place the coals between some stones. A braai grid had your meat firmly (you hoped) in it's grip and off you went, preparing a most scrumptious meal for the family. That was half the fun. The second half was listening to what everybody had seen that day, as most of the visitors would come and congregate there to cook their supper, and tell their personal stories.

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 Post subject: Re: After 64 years.........wait for it......my first trip report
Unread postPosted: Sat Nov 27, 2010 1:39 pm 
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Episode 3

The day is Friday, 5 November 2010 (Guy Fawkes day) and we are all packed and ready to start another trip down to the lowveld and my beloved Kruger Park. Unfortunately, my wife’s and my heart are sad because we are leaving our 3 dogs at home to face bangs etc. without us. We have left tranquillisers with our daughter to help keep the stress down tonight.

But before continuing, let me first introduce you to the touring party who will be coming with me on the trip:
Joey, my SO and wife of 2+ years
Jen, my sister, a couple of years older than me (and never let’s me forget it)
Brian, Jen’s husband.

We will be traveling in 2 cars as, from experience, we have found that there isn’t enough space in the Colt 4 x 4’s cab to be comfortable on a long journey. With 3 geriatrics and the 4th on the wrong side of 50, we take a lot with us and when I say a lot, I mean it. We pack everything AND the kitchen sink, ‘just in case’. Does anybody have the same problem?
With the Colt, we also pull a trailer and both trailer and back of Colt are full to capacity (just in case, you know).

At about 10:00 the lowveld was calling and we were on our way Image

We stopped at the Wimpy at Belfast for a quick snack, as this has been a tradition for many years. We were then on our way again, winding our way over & down Schoemans’ Kloof to the lowveld. Should we get some fruit at Hall’s? Hmmmmm. Maybe!
Well, what a surprise that was in store for us. I suppose it was built in time for the soccer world cup, Image but a new road has jumped onto road maps that misses out Nelspruit altogether. It seems to go between Nelspruit and White River, missing both towns. What a pleasure. Just as I thought we had hit the jackpot though, reality struck me down. How could I have imagined that, having built such a beautiful road going through some really scenic parts of our land and such fantastic bridges, that they weren’t going to collect some cash from innocent travelers.
The road took a turn towards the Nelspruit side and there, bang in front of us was the ‘monster’. Yes, we didn’t miss it. N’komati Plaza (toll gate). Having been robbed of some good money, we proceeded to our destination, Ngwenya Lodge.

Between us we had timeshare at both Ngwenya (for the 1st week) and then at Sanbonani, for the 2nd week. A stay within the reserve would have been preferable, but both resorts are pretty nice and so for this trip, we didn’t actually stay in Kruger. (sob, sob)

We continued to the second turnoff to Marloth Park and then hit ‘the road’. It is referred to as a road but the only thing that will comfortably ride on that strip of mud/sand is an army tank. Admittedly they had had rain, lots of rain apparently, and so we had to negotiate some hairy lakes in the ‘road’.
At the turnoff that takes you to Ngwenya, the ‘road’ becomes nearly as wide as the Suez Canal with massive boulders exposed, probably as the rains wash the ground away. Now it is preferable to be on a grader for this part of the journey.
Anyhow, we managed to get to Ngwenya without any serious damage to the cars and unpacked into a fantastic chalet, overlooking the Crocodile river and my farm in the lowveld, Kruger.

A view from the verandah of our chalet

Image

Image

Image

Lets you wonder and dream of the pleasures to come.

After an early supper of oxtail, one of my favourites and precooked by my sis, Jen, it was early to bed, alarms set for 04:45 and hopefully a good night’s sleep.

‘Till next time, niti-nite!

(I couldn’t go to sleep until I let you know that I am not normally a moaner and don’t whinge at everything, but toll gates and ‘that road’ well………….!

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 Post subject: Re: After 64 years.........wait for it......my first trip report
Unread postPosted: Sat Nov 27, 2010 8:29 pm 
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Hi Chip,

I enyoyed reading the first part of your trip report and looking forward to the rest :) :) :popcorn:

My first visit to Kruger was in 1974 when my family stayed at Pretoriuskop. I can still remember the day trip to Malelane, but can not recall anything of the camp. Do you perhaps know if the houses on your old photo were build before 1974. Thanks for refreshing my childhood memory on the Malelane camp. All I can remember was the sugar cane fields far off. Another interesting fact about our first journey was the petrol restriction and unavailability of fuel after 6 pm. We took two days to travel from Pinetown to Petoriuskop and still arrive just before sunset in the camp, pitching the tent in the dark. :wink:

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 Post subject: Re: After 64 years.........wait for it......my first trip report
Unread postPosted: Sat Nov 27, 2010 9:15 pm 
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Hi Son godin,
Thanks for your interest. Yes, the huts in the old pics were definitely built before 1974. I took my then girlfriend there in 1967 and stayed in the box type rooms. They had purple bougainviliea over the pagodas in front of the huts. I believe that they were there in the 1940's as well.

The sugar cane fields were a curse if you were camping and it was time for them to burn the cane. At night the heavy dew would fall and then the ash from the cane would float over into Malelane and your tent was black before you knew it. Crocodile Bridge camp has the same problem.

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 Post subject: Re: After 64 years.........wait for it......my first trip report
Unread postPosted: Sat Nov 27, 2010 9:29 pm 
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Chip I am enjoying going back to the good old days. SO went for the first time in 1947 in his aunts old chev and said they stayed in tents in Skukuza . I went in the 50s and the old huts were still in Malelane. I too remember the bougainvillas especially at the gate . We went again in the early 70s and they still has a long drop in the corner of the camp and when we were there a baboon sat on the roof and no one could get in. Letaba was still the old Letaba when we went in 1970 Old square huts with coir mattresses and a communal ablution Men/woman no separate sex ablutions and there was only one bathroom!! Communal fires and lots of chatter around them . Oh those were the days ..

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 Post subject: Re: After 64 years.........wait for it......my first trip report
Unread postPosted: Sun Nov 28, 2010 7:46 pm 
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Episode 4

Image It’s 04:45 Image and it’s time to get up and start enjoying our holiday in Kruger. After the usual ablutions, coffee, breakfast and making a little padkos (food for the road), we were off to tackle ‘the road’.

No problem there and at 06:20 we got to Crocodile Bridge. Was the new bridge going to be open? ……Not sure as the last posting I read on the forum said it wasn’t…….Hope it is!
Well…….tada! What a pleasant surprise
Image .
We were told at the CB reception that the bridge had opened on Wednesday, 3 November, 3 days before we got there. Looks good to me and should take a lot of water before flooding.

As Infinity & Sanparks had parted company on 20 October and Sanparks’ new cards were only going to be issued from December, you had to go to the reception in the camp again and fill out a form. No swiping your card at the new terminals yet. The procedure took less time than in the past and then we were ready for our big adventure………….No we weren’t………almost forgot the YR.

Image
I hope my physiotherapist isn’t a member of the forum, as the YR is actually an elasticised scarf that I am supposed to exercise my neck with.

The route each day was always left to me (if we saw nothing, they had someone to blame, I think, although they wouldn’t admit it). It was quite difficult because some of the party needed loo stops regularly and so the route planned had to include these.

Today I decided that we would take the S28 up to H4-2 and then call in at Lower Sabie. After that, along the H4-1 as far as the S21. Go along that for about 5 kms until just past the pan with no name. Then we would turn around and back to Lower Sabie for refreshments (and loo stop) and back to CB via the H4-2. Not too hectic for our first day and we should be back at Ngwenya just after lunch.

Between CB and the Vurhami bridge we saw wildies, giraffe, white rhino warthog and big snails (I think they are called Panther Agate snails) crossing the road. They reminded me of soft serve ice-cream in a cone.
This handsome guy posed for his photo

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Onto the S28 and we saw kudu, impala and an elephant in the distance. As it was our first ele, we stopped for a while and looked at the old guy through ‘verkykers’ (far lookers or binoculars, as Shakespeare used to call them). A few cars were stopped about 50 meters down the road from us and we thought they were also looking at the mighty one. No! “We heard a lion but haven’t seen it yet” was what we got after questioning them. OK. After a while and no sounds, we left them to their thing and moved on. It was maybe another 2 kms and my SO sitting behind me shouted “LIONS”. There they were, 2 magnificent males, walking out of the bush, into the road. We had them to ourselves for about 15 minutes and then the cars and JJs started arriving in their numbers. The lions just lay there and a poor little steenbokkie came along, oblivious of the danger. When he saw the lions, he froze, for about 4/5 minutes. Then he raced off as if the Springbok tight 5 were after him. Did he really think that those fat bellies were interested in him?

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As we had seen the best of them, we moved on and only as we drove away, I saw that we were right at the turnoff to the Nhlanganzwani dam (with a hole in the wall). We took that road (S107) and saw a potential feather duster that was so dirty, he should of, but wasn’t ashamed of himself.
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Back on the H4-2 we saw buffaloes on the way to Lower Sabie.

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The one old guy looked as if the wood worms had got into his horns

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We eventually got to Lower Sabie and got such a good surprise. New toilets just next to the car park meant that you didn’t have to torture yourself to get to the loo by running down to the ones next to the reception.

To be continued………………..after everybody had had a pit stop.

_________________
Proud supporter of the Golden Lions
Read my memoirs and Nov. 2010 Trip Report
Next visit to Kruger 17 Aug to 22 Aug at Crocodile Bridge
UNITE AGAINST POACHING


Last edited by Chip on Mon Nov 29, 2010 8:03 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: After 64 years.........wait for it......my first trip report
Unread postPosted: Sun Nov 28, 2010 8:52 pm 
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Location: Horizon View
Episode 4……. continued


After the ‘Relief of Mafikeng’, we went around the corner to one of our favourite spots. Sunset dam (without a hole in the wall)

There we saw some huge crocs, ‘plensh’ hippos, a black-winged stilt and an Egyptian goose with chicks (and a piece of string in her mouth – do these things fish by any chance?)

Some pics

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It was so nice to see Sunset dam without all the green algae and water hyacinth.

Now we were on my favourite road the H4-1. Monkeys first, with babies and then a traffic jam. But not the usual jam on the H4-1 when lions were about, so we presumed that it must be eles or something. Cars were in line from both sides and after a few minutes stop, the cars would move on for the next ones to look at………………..what! Really, such orderly manners.
When it was our turn, well, what a surprise. 2 sleeping male lions right next to the road, one with his leg in the air, cooling his Image A few pics

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and off we went. Carried on until the S21 and didn’t see too much. On the S21 we went as far as the nameless pan. On the way there, we saw the remains of a giraffe kill and at the nameless pan, there was no water in it. No trouble to a little fella who was going to swim, come what may. The only place with water in was a puddle in the road

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and after his swim, off again.

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After the terrapin, some guinea fowl popped along to say hi. Leaving the pan with no name, I wondered why nobody had found a name for it. Come on forumites, get a competition going to name the poor thing.

We turned around and went back to the H4-2. Before we got there, we passed a salon where this vain guy was being groomed

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Back now towards L. Sabie and the same lions. This time however, they graced us by sitting up, or at least one of them did.

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On the way back to C.B., after a quick pit stop, we saw a troop of monkeys with their little ones. Cute aren’t they!


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That is, if you like monkeys!

The rest of the trip was quiet, except for 2 bateleurs who had caught something and were eating it on the ground. Unfortunately, the grass was too long for a pic.

We got back to Ngwenya at about 14:00 after a very eventful day with four of the big five under the belt. Only missing the elusive one.


Niti-nite until the next time

_________________
Proud supporter of the Golden Lions
Read my memoirs and Nov. 2010 Trip Report
Next visit to Kruger 17 Aug to 22 Aug at Crocodile Bridge
UNITE AGAINST POACHING


Last edited by Chip on Sun Nov 28, 2010 8:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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