Skip to Content

Tree: Baobab (Adansonia digitata)

Find, identify and discuss the plants of all the SANParks

Moderator: lion queen

User avatar
ceruleanwildfire
Posts: 135
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2005 5:22 pm
Location: Born and Bred in SA, Living in NZ
Contact:

Unread postby ceruleanwildfire » Thu Apr 07, 2005 4:08 pm

This is quoted out of one of my books so I can't take credit for it;

Making the most of Indigenous Trees wrote:During the rainy season when the trees are in leaf, it is a good fodder tree, especially for game (elephant, kudu, nyala and impala). At the end of the season cattle eat the fallen leaves. Various game species and cattle relish the fallen flowers. Elephant sometimes destroy vast numbers of baobab trees by tearing off pieces of the stem for moisture. The only way to save these trees is to restrict the number of elephant in the area. The roots can be tapped for water and the young roots cooked and eaten. Fibre from the inner bark is used for rope, baskets, nets and fishing lines. The young leaves are cooked and eaten as spinach or can be dried and powdered to be used later. The leaves are rich in vitamin C, sugars and potassium tartrate. The acid pith of the fruit is rich in ascorbic acid and can be used to make a refreshing drink. Seeds can be eaten fresh or dry or roasted to provide a substitute for coffee. The pulp and seeds have a high nutritional value and are recommended for feeding to stock late in the dry season when grazing is poor. The baobab is a popular species for bonsai specimens. The South African "Baobab Style" originated from this species.

User avatar
Krokodile
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 265
Joined: Tue Dec 21, 2004 12:13 am
Location: Wondering if I'll ever get back to SA!
Contact:

Unread postby Krokodile » Thu Apr 07, 2005 11:35 pm

Fishing floats are made from the wood.
Juice from the bark can be inserted into a poisoned arrow wound to stop the poison from spreading.
Flour can be made from the roots.,

Dr Livingstone apparently called the Baobab "the giant upturned carrot".

User avatar
Guinea Pig
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 1743
Joined: Sat Jan 29, 2005 12:52 pm
Location: My business...
Contact:

Unread postby Guinea Pig » Fri Apr 08, 2005 7:32 am

This tree blew my mind. I never realised how versatile it was. This is what I got from books:

1. Among the branches you'll find a cavity often filled with water - even in the driest months, and anyone willing to climb a tree will be able to quench his thirst.
2. The leaves can be boiled for something the equivalent of spinach.
3. Seeds can either be eaten as is or ground and used as replacement for coffee.
4. The fruit is a rich source of calcium and Vit C.
5. The fruit contains tartaric acid used to make sherbet.
6. The spongy wood can be processed into ropes.
7. San Bushmen use the seeds as an anti-dote to Strophantin, a common plant-derived arrow poison. (This one DuQues sent me as we got totally immersed in this magic tree!)
8. Makes good fodder for game in dry months.
9. Roots can be tapped for water.
10. Fruit is also used in making Cream of Tartar (See 5).
11. Roots are used to make a soluble red dye, leaves a soluble green dye.
12. The hard fruit shells are used as pots for food and drink.
13. The pollen from the tree is used to manufacture a quite acceptable glue.
14. It's a popular Bonsai Species.
15. Some of the more unconventional uses - bar, toilet, gathering place etc. :lol:

If this were a human - one 8) dude! :lol:

User avatar
DuQues
Honorary Virtual Ranger
Honorary Virtual Ranger
Posts: 17940
Joined: Fri Jan 14, 2005 5:42 pm
Location: Red sand, why do I keep thinking of red sand?
Contact:

Unread postby DuQues » Fri Apr 08, 2005 9:00 am

OK, You forgot some salient points:
16. Repairs hippo/rhino hide (Proof!)
17. Reminds people that even Gods can make mistakes. (Bushman tales again, they thought it was planted upsidedown).

The food use should have been very easy for the Dutch (And Belgians) as the Dutch name for Baobab is apenbroodboom. (Monkeybreadtree).

For an indepth report on the uses, nutricional value, distribution, and research, visit here. Bit of a long read, readers of this thread will mostly be interested in Chapter 5, Domestic food uses and local processing.
Pictures of all the species of Baobab can be found throughout the report. (Bushman hole, Chapter 2, just like the bar.)
Arriving currently: The photos from our trip! Overhere! :yaya:

Feel free to use any of these additional letters to correct the spelling of words found in the above post: a-e-t-n-d-i-o-s-m-l-u-y-h-c

User avatar
DuQues
Honorary Virtual Ranger
Honorary Virtual Ranger
Posts: 17940
Joined: Fri Jan 14, 2005 5:42 pm
Location: Red sand, why do I keep thinking of red sand?
Contact:

Unread postby DuQues » Fri Apr 15, 2005 9:51 am

Yet another little fact which we overlooked:

Devils dwell in baobabs, awaiting their victims. It is said that if you put your ear to the trunk, you can hear them laughing. Some African people sing when they pass baobab trees at night, so as not to be influenced by the spirits' voices. The flowers, too, contain spirits, and anyone who picks them will be eaten by a lion.

(From the Ghosts and Magic in the Kruger National Park page, which you can find here.)
Thanx WTM!
Arriving currently: The photos from our trip! Overhere! :yaya:

Feel free to use any of these additional letters to correct the spelling of words found in the above post: a-e-t-n-d-i-o-s-m-l-u-y-h-c

User avatar
Krokodile
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 265
Joined: Tue Dec 21, 2004 12:13 am
Location: Wondering if I'll ever get back to SA!
Contact:

Baobab Relocation

Unread postby Krokodile » Fri Jun 03, 2005 9:48 pm

Theres a nice article about the moving of 2 Baobab trees from Letaba camp to the Giriyondo Border Post on the front page of the site. I was at Letaba a couple of weeks ago watching the guys painstakingly digging out the soil around the big baobab with spades - looked like a helluva job!


Image

gwendolen
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Posts: 5030
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 5:57 pm
Contact:

Unread postby gwendolen » Fri Jun 03, 2005 9:59 pm

Wow, Moving trees that big. :shock:

User avatar
Krokodile
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 265
Joined: Tue Dec 21, 2004 12:13 am
Location: Wondering if I'll ever get back to SA!
Contact:

Unread postby Krokodile » Fri Jun 03, 2005 10:08 pm

It was quite amazing. They estimated that they would have to dig down another 2 metres to get the roots free enough to move the tree but the tap root was ENORMOUS! They told me that the tree was only 18 years old (the article says 30) but had been fed with compost and watered regularly which was why it was so big. In fact it was the leafiest baobab I saw in the park - poor thing was being dug up in its prime....shame :? The other baobab was much smaller and they didn't think it would take long to dig out. The photo's I took were 24/05/05, so it obviously didn't take long in the grand scheme of things!

User avatar
Freda
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Posts: 2005
Joined: Sun Dec 05, 2004 7:01 am
Location: Marloth Park, South Africa
Contact:

Unread postby Freda » Sat Jun 04, 2005 8:15 am

What a huge task, now I must visit Giriyondo to see them :)
A big thankyou to Sasol Nitro and J P Crane Hire for sponsoring this, great to see that big firms are interested in conservation and prepared to give their time and money. :D

User avatar
arks
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 4096
Joined: Sun Mar 20, 2005 5:53 pm
Location: Cambridge, MA (and home from home in Darling, WC)
Contact:

Unread postby arks » Sat Jun 04, 2005 2:59 pm

Great pix!! Thanks for posting them!

User avatar
Pilane
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
Posts: 449
Joined: Fri Jan 14, 2005 8:11 pm
Location: Somewhere in the Bush

Unread postby Pilane » Sat Jun 04, 2005 6:20 pm

This is going to take a lot of digging.... :D

User avatar
wildtuinman
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Posts: 5462
Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2004 10:27 am
Location: Chasing down the rarities
Contact:

Baobabs in Kruger (Photo's)

Unread postby wildtuinman » Tue Jun 28, 2005 6:48 am

In the Makuleke area between the Levuuu river and the Pafuri gate. Not too far from the bridge side.
Image
666
Latest Lifer(s): Buff-spotted Flufftail, Tree Pipit, Dimorphic Egret, Lesser Jacana

Follow me as I bird on Twitter @wildtuinman

User avatar
francoisd
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Posts: 1936
Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 1:38 pm
Contact:

Unread postby francoisd » Tue Jun 28, 2005 8:07 am

The Baobab at Baobab Hill is on a hill as far as I can remember and if I'm not mistaken this is it below...
ImageLarge

and this is a view down the road at Baobab Hill looking in the direction of Pafuri.
You may notice the green belt next to the river in the distance
ImageLarge
Last edited by Elsa on Mon Oct 14, 2013 12:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Pics resized.
"The measure of life is not its duration but its donation." - Peter Marshall
www.flickr.com/groups/birdssa

User avatar
Katja
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
Posts: 438
Joined: Wed Jan 12, 2005 3:12 pm
Location: Denmark
Contact:

Unread postby Katja » Wed Jun 29, 2005 5:05 pm

I took this picture of the same tree at the end of May 2005.

Image
KTP: November 2014
KNP: March 2015

User avatar
wildtuinman
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Posts: 5462
Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2004 10:27 am
Location: Chasing down the rarities
Contact:

Unread postby wildtuinman » Thu Jun 30, 2005 6:37 am

Another foto taken in June 2004.

Image
666
Latest Lifer(s): Buff-spotted Flufftail, Tree Pipit, Dimorphic Egret, Lesser Jacana

Follow me as I bird on Twitter @wildtuinman


Return to “Plants”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest