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Hyaena, Spotted

Find, identify and discuss the animals of all the SANParks

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Unread postby Nico » Sun Feb 19, 2006 11:19 pm

They create "chaos" by running in the dark through, for example a group of impala's so that it will be easy to attack a disorientated animal.They call tham masters of CHAOS. :shock:
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Unread postby LittleLeopard » Sun Feb 19, 2006 11:34 pm

Once the pack has decided which animal in the herd to attack, the Spotted Hyaena chases its prey over long distances, tiring the animal until it falls. They also bring prey animals down by tearing at the flesh as they run. They mostly hunt at night.

Ambush attacks also take place at times. :?
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Unread postby Imberbe » Mon Feb 20, 2006 10:20 pm

You are correct in describing the hunting behaviour of the Spotted Hyena. :D

I do not think that they are really good at ambush though! They are not built for stealth, in fact they sound more like a bulldozer when you hear them moving through the bush at night! Although, when opportunity presents itself they will use ambush as well.

I once saw a program on a pair of Hyenas that actually used an ambush technique. The one would prod the animal in the direction of its mate that was hiding in a dip. When the unsuspecting prey got close enough, it would rush out and grab it. The pair regularly used the same technique and place. I do however think that this is the exception, rather than the rule.
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Unread postby Imberbe » Tue Feb 28, 2006 9:53 pm

Spotted Hyena is able to drive lions from a kill. This often leads to serious altercations and sometimes animals (both Hyena and Lion) are seriously injured or even killed. If there are enough Hyena to substantially outnumber the lion pride, they will attack and harass the lions, until they leave!
There is however one factor that mostly prevent them from being able to do this! A big male or coalition seems to be just too intimidating! They are just so much bigger and stronger than any Hyena, that they seem to negate a numerical advantage the Hyena might hold. A lot of instances have been noted where male Lion have intentionally attacked and killed Hyena. :shock:
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Unread postby DuQues » Mon May 01, 2006 5:08 pm

Nature just published an article about pregnant dominant spotted hyena's giving their offspring a heavy dose of testoteron in the second half of the pregnancy to help them up the ranks even before birth.
It seems to work,
Nature wrote:(...) both male and female cubs born to mothers with high concentrations of androgens in late pregnancy exhibit higher rates of aggression and mounting behaviour than cubs born to mothers with lower androgen concentrations. Both behaviours are strongly affected in other mammals by organizational effects of androgens, and both have important effects on fitness in hyaenas. Therefore, our results suggest that rank-related maternal effects of prenatal androgen exposure can adaptively influence offspring phenotype in mammals, as has previously been shown to occur in birds. They also suggest an organizational mechanism for the development of female dominance and aggressiveness in spotted hyaenas, traits that may offset the costs of extreme virilization.
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Biyamiti #3 - Hyaena Regurgitation

Unread postby Stephen » Tue May 09, 2006 12:17 pm

Stephen wrote::D
Well done Wildtuinman. Indeed it is the regurgitation(hair & bone) from a Hyaena (Crocuta crocuta) that had an Impala (Aepyceros melampus) as a meal.
Hyena are very good at using almost all of a carcass as food and that is one of the reasons they are such successful predators.
However to be able to make the most of a meal and get all the protein and fat out of bone it does not deed to waste time and energy on pieces of prey that it can not get any use off.
Hair, horns and hoofs – with basic matter of keratin, which is rather indigestible – are regurgitated.
Only what can get used is actually fully processed by the digestive system.
Just another way that one of the most successful predators adapted to make live easier for itself.

In cases of lion and leopard a good majority of hair continue through the digestive system.
Last edited by Stephen on Thu May 11, 2006 11:12 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Biyamiti #6 - Fresh Hyaena Dung

Unread postby Stephen » Mon May 15, 2006 4:50 pm

:D Greetings from Biyamiti

The dung is olive green in colour.
Please help, what was wrong with this animal? :wink:

Yes to my knowledge nothing was wrong with this animal.
It was indeed dung from hyaena and as you correctly said dung from predators (especially hyaena) tends to be olive green when fresh, turning white when drying out.
The high calcium content (from eating bones) having that result.

The dung is very typical shaped, which is a dead giveaway for hyaena, there are some fine hair in (remember the regurgitation of the furball by hyaena) but not as much as would be expected from lion dung.
Lion dung would also tend to be more sausage like and generally much darker (almost black) because of the blood (with less bone) intake at a kill.

Indeed baboon dung would show the plant material (seeds mostly) clearly visible in the dung.
The baboon would also make smaller droppings with a slightly pointed defecation.

Leopard dung would be much along the lines of that of lion – just much smaller with less hair as they prefer plucking their prey before eating.

Just to give you an idea of the size of this dung heap – it was measuring about 25 cm across.
Last edited by Stephen on Tue May 16, 2006 11:26 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Hyenas

Unread postby Meandering Mouse » Sun May 28, 2006 12:47 pm

Can you believe it, nothing on hyenas.
I love the critters.
To me they are the street kids of the park.. they beg, scavange, they are chased off by all other more established predators.. they look like hell...
The ultimate expression of God's sense of humour... but also the sadness of the outcast.
they even produce strange turds... yet they are so important.
Anyone want to join me in a tribute to hyenas?
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Unread postby saraf » Thu Jul 13, 2006 10:48 pm

They showed some footage of hyenas eating a live wildebeest tonight on Big Cat Diary Uncut - trying to explain why hyenas get a "bad press". It was pretty traumatic to watch and I really don't think I could have watched it for real. They said the cameraman was shook up.

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Unread postby Meandering Mouse » Fri Jul 14, 2006 7:42 am

It does sound brutal, I am not sure I could watch. :shock:
I have worked with many kinds of trauma, often with physical injury of one sort or other. One thing that does seem to stand out, is the way the body is numbed during moments of terror. No one recalls the physical pain. Time also takes on a different dimension.
I only hope the same is happening when an animal is taken down, that the experience of pain is not as intense as usual and that the senses are indeed numbed.
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Unread postby DuQues » Thu Sep 07, 2006 3:09 pm

One of the little fellows near Balule on a nightdrive:

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Unread postby Wild about cats » Sun Sep 17, 2006 4:47 pm

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Unread postby Muhammad » Fri Oct 27, 2006 9:49 pm

S1,S65 junction culvert.
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Unread postby Muhammad » Fri Oct 27, 2006 9:54 pm

Phabeni leader

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Unread postby arks » Fri Oct 27, 2006 10:12 pm

Gorgeous pix, Muhammad — especially the very young one!! 8)
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