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Cape Buffalo

Find, identify and discuss the animals of all the SANParks

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wildtuinman
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Unread postby wildtuinman » Thu Apr 17, 2008 9:48 am

Bentley,

Buffalo is not affected or being placed under pressure by TB.

They are carriers of the disease and it affects other animals who feed on them.

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wildtuinman
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Unread postby wildtuinman » Thu Apr 17, 2008 9:52 am

Sorry, only answered half your question. Yes, TB in Buff are spreading at a rate of knots with previous populations which tested clean in the Northern parts of Kruger now also testing positive for TB.

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Unread postby gerharddb » Thu Apr 17, 2008 7:16 pm

like WTM said buffs are the carriers of the TB. Predators like lion will feed on them and then get the TB which affects them tremendously and leads to death. On a walk in Jan 2008 we had a student studying the lions in KNP. She claimed that 95% of the lions in KNP have the TB. And then she went further by saying that if there isn't anything done to stop the TB we wont have much lions left 2015!!! :evil: :shock: :shock:

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Unread postby gerharddb » Thu Apr 17, 2008 7:27 pm

Like WTM said buffs are the carriers of the TB. So when predators like lion feast on them they get the TB which will affect them negatively and cause death.

On a morning walk we did in Jan '08 there was a student studying the lions in KNP and she claimed that 95% of the lions in KNP had the TB. Then she even went further by telling the whole group that if SANPARKS don't do anything about it we wont have many lions left by 2015!!! :evil: :twisted: :shock: :shock:

maybe the mods can find out more on this?

Richprins

TB

Unread postby Richprins » Thu Apr 17, 2008 7:59 pm

Welcome, gerhard!

One thing that needs to be stressed is that bovine TB is not a natural African disease, but has entered the Park from outside.

As far as lion are concerned, I wouldn't worry too much, as their natural death rate as well as their natural replacement rate is sky high, depending on a myriad of factors, including Anthrax and feline aids, but mostly prey scarcity and cub-killing by new males.

Ironically this "conveyor-belt" system should see them through! :)

More on this on the "Lion" thread!

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Unread postby bentley » Fri Apr 18, 2008 6:20 pm

I'm a bit lost for words after reading that..so even if there is a breeding program with buff's, basically the TB problem is here to stay ? One picks it up from some where & away it goes again. Where or how do they get TB ?
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TB

Unread postby Richprins » Fri Apr 18, 2008 9:07 pm

Hi, bentley!

The areas bordering the western boundary of the Park form a "buffer zone", combined with a veterinary "Red line", originally designed to prevent Corridor disease, Anthrax, Rinderpest etc from ESCAPING the Park's boundaries!

Presumably, therefore, the TB did not come from that side, but rather from Mozambique, or more probably from the Southern border! :shock:

Once again, it has been prevalent for a number of years, and any really drastic disasters would have taken place by now.

However, should the long overdue drought occur, it would probably have a drastic exponential effect on weakened animals, along with most other diseases! :?

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Unread postby bentley » Sat Apr 19, 2008 10:15 am

The problems that wildlife has been experiencing in the past and present, did they have problems of the likes before man started invading their natural habitat ? Or is it just the case of natures way of controling things ?
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Daghaboys

Unread postby Pikkie » Fri May 09, 2008 8:46 am

Hi everyone;
I often read in Lourens' report the term "duggaboys". I'm :redface: :? embarrassed to say I don't have an idea (or ID) on what this could mean.
Where does word originate from and what does it mean?
Thanks and waiting with anticipation to be enlightened!!
Michael

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wildtuinman
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Unread postby wildtuinman » Fri May 09, 2008 9:01 am

Daggaboys or daghaboys are old buffalo bulls.

They are mostly single or in gorups of 2 or 3 roaming bulls who loves to spend time in reeds where they roll in mud (african name for dagga) and they tend to have a severe lack of sense for humor.

Being very aggressive and and usually carrying some sort of injury makes them one of thee most dangerous animals to encounter on foot.

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Unread postby wildtuinman » Fri May 09, 2008 9:07 am

Dagha or dagga is the african name of what is a mixture of sand and cement and used in the building industry. The mud these buffaloes roll in about, tends to get as hard as this mixture.

It has many uses for buffaloes: keeping flies at bay, cooling them down, keeping wounds covered and getting parasites and ticks off from them when the dry patches peel off either thru scraping up against something or whatever other method the bull may choose.

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Unread postby wildtuinman » Fri May 09, 2008 10:08 am

Pikkie wrote: On the video clip of the lions, buffalo and croc attack I could here the driver of the safari vehicle calling other safari vehicles and saying that the nyatsies have struck back at the (another strange word used for lion I suppose). Are those just private terms that they use among themselves to prevent other listeners to understand what they are saying to have the sightings all to themselves, or is it only safari talk!


Nyati = buffalo. Just a common african term used amongst the bush wise people. :wink:

I think it's the Swahili name.

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Unread postby Ingala » Fri May 09, 2008 1:48 pm

Indeed Dagga boys have a lack of humour, A rather upset old boy decided to take his frustrations out on a private farms Landrover late last year following an altercation he had with some hungry lion. The incident was totally unprovoked there was no warning. No body was injured including the Buffalo.

The damage to the vehicle was farily significant and changed opinions of the neighbouring private lodges in the Timbavati who make habit of removing the front doors of their game viewing landrovers!

The old boy moved off some 3km from location after the landy attack, only to become Kitty fodder to another pride of 5 lion the next evening! Tracker and Guide were very pleased with their trophy of the horns (measuring 86cm from point to point)after the lion and hyena had made sort work of the carcase.

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Unread postby Imberbe » Fri May 09, 2008 2:46 pm

:lol:

Nyati is indeed the Swahili, but locally more relevant the Shona name for a Buffalo. Many of the other African languages have similar sounding names such as inyathi (Zulu, Xhosa, Ndebele) and inyatsi (Swati).

I have had the "privilege" to walking in to a group of these boys a couple of times whilst guiding. I must admit that that situation is my favourite nightmare. Hence the nervous :lol: .

LUCKILY they are not the most attentive animals! We have always seen them, before they saw us and have had time to get out to a safe distance.

They always look at you as if you ow them some money ... lots of money!
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Unread postby Ingala » Fri May 09, 2008 4:21 pm

There's an amazing programme on NatGeo Wild, ran a few months ago, about the chap who is breeding TB free Buffs.Goes through his 13? year track record from first attempts until toady's successes. The most amazing part of this film is despite Buffalo reputations, how easily they can be domesticated. His experience in handling Buffalo also was put to the test on a neighbouring farm where Buffalo had to be removed. Instead of darting the wild herd and re-locating, the chap actually herded the Buffalo off the land following a 2 week daily familiarisation with the herd.


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