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 Post subject: Re: Traditions, believes, legends and folklore about Nature.
Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2011 3:20 pm 
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Location: Johannesburg - where they cut down trees and name streets after them.
BrendaK, that sounds awesome!! :dance:

You will have to tell us the story of Lion Queen of the Timbavati and also more about Mapungubwe? :pray:

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 Post subject: Re: Traditions, believes, legends and folklore about Nature.
Unread postPosted: Sun Sep 25, 2011 4:52 am 
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Quote:
The mighty Rhinoceros

In the olden days, Africans honoured the rhinoceros. They so respected it the rhinoceros and were so much in awe of it that very few tribes named themselves after it. Throughout Southern Africa, only one small tribe used this sacred beast as it's totem: the Bedla people of the land of the Xhosa (bhele being the Xhosa name for a rhinoceros). The Batswana people call a rhinoceros tsukudu, a name which means "the struggling animal" or "the animal of mighty effort".

African people regarded the rhinoceros with great reverence and they regarded it's horn not as an aphrodisiac, but as a weapon possessing great magical powers for annihilating and scattering enemies. If you wanted to cause confusion among your enemies and force them to scatter, and not unite against you, you took a small piece of rhinoceros horn from a rhinoceros who died from natural causes in the bush and burnt it next to the enemy village.

In olden days, it was believed that killing a rhinoceros would result in a curse on the killer or killers of this sacred animal. The curse would extend to their wives and children, grandchildren and great-grand children.

To this day, when people who are friends suddenly quarrel and separate, Swazi people especially, believe that an unknown enemy has burnt a piece of rhino horn to bring about the dispute.

From the book: Isilwane, the animal (Tales and fables of Africa)
Credo Mutwa.

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 Post subject: Re: Traditions, believes, legends and folklore about Nature.
Unread postPosted: Sun Sep 25, 2011 9:11 am 
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For anyone interested in birds in myth, legend and superstition, a book worth buying is: Flights of fantasy by Peter Tate

A lovely little titbit from the book:

"Feathers feature widely in popular superstition, but their significance varies enourmously according to the species of bird involved. Since late Victorian times many people believed that peacock feathers were unlucky if worn or brought indoors, but treating kingfisher's feathers in a similar way is thought to heighten the wearer's beauty. Wren feathers are regarded as very lucky: sailors formaly used to carry a feather from a wren slain on new year's day to guard against shipwrecks.

Some superstitions apply specifically to the type of feather used to stuff pillows and mattresses. At one time, sewing a swanns feather into a husband's pillow was thought to be the best way to ensure he remained fathful. Pigeon, or game feathers in the pillow of an invalid, by contrast, were regarded with great trepidation and, if discovered, were removed for fear there would be a long drawn out death".

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 Post subject: Re: Traditions, believes, legends and folklore about Nature.
Unread postPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2012 7:24 am 
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I have been reading a book on St Francis, "St Francis and the song of brotherhood", by Eric Doyle. In it he discusses the little saints message about the enviroment as being pertinant today.

St Francis had a particular love for the Lark. He loved the brown that reminded him of the earth. He said it was the colour of humility. His frair's habits were inspired by the Lark, possibly the rufus lark.

It is said that as St Francis lay dying hundreds of larks flew around singing.

One of his frairs commented, " Tearful rejoicing and joyful sorrow made up their song, either to bemoan the fact that they were orphaned children, or to announce the fact that their father was going to his eternal glory".

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 Post subject: Re: Traditions, believes, legends and folklore about Nature.
Unread postPosted: Tue Nov 26, 2013 9:22 pm 
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Location: (NZ) -Outside the park - always looking back in-
Legends and folklore or just a bit of leg pulling? These two stories were related to my children recently on their visit to KNP by a friendly local.
Girls- do you know why when the Hadeda flies he makes the noise haa haaa haaaa ? It is because he is afraid of heights!!!! :lol: :lol:
And the kudu is called so - because when he runs all you can hear is his man bag slapping his flanks to the rhythm of ku du -ku du - ku du .
So many great tales and story tellers in SA.


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