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Unread postPosted: Fri May 06, 2005 12:31 pm 
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KNP Spokesman wrote:
At the risk of this subject being on another thread (and getting the wrath of WTM down on me), what would you guys and girls feel about SANParks organised photographic tours? Personally (I have seen some of these tours in action) I don't like them as I perceive that they might cramp my style and everyone ends up getting either the same or pretty similar shots, but what do you guys think? There are a few private companies that run them but we, as an organisation, don't as yet.

Kind regards
KNP Spokesman


KNPS, this is a very interesting idea. It would depend I think on how they were run. For example, would such tours be limited to the roads only, where we can already travel? Or would it be more like the old style night drives where guides were allowed (or am I getting someone into trouble?) to go off the roads in order to get closer to interesting creatures?

BTW - which Ricoh did you start off with? Mine was the KR-5 Super II, which was sadly stolen 4 years ago :x . I've since replaced it with the even older (but actually better) XR-1 thanks to EBay, and also still love to shoot a couple of rolls of Velvia when I can justify it.

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Unread postPosted: Mon May 09, 2005 8:17 pm 
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KNP Spokesman wrote:
Hi Acekam and others on this thread

Many camps still show films, Berg n Dal, Pretoriuskop and Skukuza come to mind immediately. But unfortunately it is not a standard product, simply because of logistics. Many camps were still operating on the old film projector mode only a few years ago and - thanks to generous help from the Honorary Rangers and other organisations - we were able to replace most of the equipment with "modern" TVs and VHS machines.
As most will know, repeated "heavy duty" use of VHS systems takes its toll on both tapes and equipment, but we try and keep everything in working order. It also depends largely on customer demand. I am sure that the Hospitality Services Managers of camps will make every effort in this regard if he/she receives enough enquiries.


I enjoyed watching a documentary on a lion pride while waiting for a night drive to begin at Satara. Are there any documentaries filmed in Kruger? I, for one would find them fascinating.


KNP Spokesman wrote:
At the risk of this subject being on another thread (and getting the wrath of WTM down on me), what would you guys and girls feel about SANParks organised photographic tours? Personally (I have seen some of these tours in action) I don't like them as I perceive that they might cramp my style and everyone ends up getting either the same or pretty similar shots, but what do you guys think? There are a few private companies that run them but we, as an organisation, don't as yet.

Kind regards
KNP Spokesman


Oh yes please. :clap:
As an enthusiastic beginner I'd love the opportunity to learn and improve my skills from the more experienced photographers. In fact I was going to start looking around to see if anyone did this for my next visit. Like everyone else said though, it would have to be kept to small groups.


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 Post subject: Some Interesting Facts from the Good Old Days
Unread postPosted: Thu Jun 02, 2005 10:20 am 
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Location: 4 hours from KNP : South Africa
I have a book published in 1974 called Kruger Park Guide but Anthony Dawes.

Did you know that in 1974 :

Not all camps were open all year round.
Croc Bridge, Punda Marie (then called Punda Milia), Shingwidzi, Nwanedzi, Malelane, Balule were closed from Nov through to April.

In 1974 it cost :

R3-00 per adult in a hut at Letaba
R16-00 for a family cottage with kitchenette for 4 people at Olifants
R2-50 pp at Orpen (hut)
R7-50 for self contained Rondeval (for 2) at Pretoriuskop.
Etc

Quote:
Self-contained rondavels at Lower Sabie, Pretoriuskop and Skukuza are air-conditioned. Some ordinary huts are also available air-conditioned at R1-00 per night extra


Camping : Per vehicle (5 or fewer people) R1-50, 20cents a night per extra person.

Entrance Fees :
Adults R1-50
Children (aged 6 - 16) 50 cents
Cars : R1-oo plus 50 cents a day
Etc

Restaurant Meals :

Breakfast : 80 cents
Lunch : R1-20
Dinner : R1-50
Half price of above for children under 10

Then there is a 2 page list of what visitors should take with them such a clothing, medicines, etc etc (it looks as bad as my camping list, which excludes some of the items mentioned in the book.

The Rand conversion rate in 1973 was

R1-00 / GBP0.69p
R1-00/ USD1.49

What happened to the good old days??

Hope you enjoyed this bit of info :D


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Thu Jun 02, 2005 12:05 pm 
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Location: GAUTENG , S.A.
Those were the heydays for KNP and they were 100% fully booked even out of season.
Many accommodation bookings were done on the ex-military radios at each camp.
The infrastructure, facilities, roads, accommodation and shops were already up to the standard they are today and even better maintained.
The shops stocked frozen meat that was better than you could bring in from outside.
Beers and ice were also freely available and well priced.
And culled buffalo/elephant biltong was about R2 a kilo.
All we used to take in was Scotch whisky, dry groceries (coffee, sugar, tin food etc.) and fruit/vegetables. Milk was exclusively condensed type in tins.
Those restaurant meals were 5 course affairs unbeatable anywhere.
And they were better patronized than today so they were profitable too.
Olifants camp lunch was a cold meats and salad buffet and I remember some Capetonians raved about it and that really says something.
And the price stability continued unto the early 80's.
In 1981 the huts at Shingwedzi and Punda Maria were R3-50 for 2 a night in summer (50% discount).
Fuel in those days came directly from Lourenco Marques and was substantially cheaper than that in "civilization".
In 1977 the tar road reached Pafuri and the park's development was at it's zenith in my opinion.
Only discomfort I remember was the lack of airconditioning in our motorcars leading to excessive consumption of cold beers.
But most accommodation did have airconditioning although I still maintain that the board should rather have invested in swimming pools in ALL camps.
Budget wise a trip is about a hundred times more costly today than thirty years ago for exactly the same trip.
But an addict will pay even if it was a thousand times more.


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sat Jun 04, 2005 9:35 am 
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Oh foxy this is all so interesting - I too have a book on Kruger by C.S. Stokes dating back to 1942 and the prices are even cheaper than those you quote -

I quote - (it is somewhat lengthy but so interesting that I did not wish to leave anything out)

To gain entry to the park, a permit is necessary.
The relative charge is one pound in respect of each motor vehicle with not more than ten passengers, while an admission fee of five pounds applies to each caravan and trailer.
The entrance of buses, vans and motor cycles is prohibited. Additional to the admission levy, an entrance charge of five shillings is made for each person, over the number of four and sixteen years of age or more travelling in any single car or other vehicle.

At a cost of two pounds a season ticket is obtainable at all of the park's entrance gates (Now we know where they got the idea for the Wildcard)
The purchaser is entitled repeatedly to enter any open part of the sanctuary during the twelve months to which the ticket applies.

Holders of the Kruger Park's Life Fellowship, for which a contribution of twenty-five pounds is made to the funds of the National Parks Board of Trustees, have free entry to all reserves, when open, controlled by the Board.
They also receive, free of charge, certain tickets covering accommodation at rest huts.

Rest Camps - Rest camps are established at Skukuza, Pretorius Kop, Crocodile Bridge, Letaba, Lower Sabi, Malelane, Olifants River causeway, Olifants Gorge, Punda Maria, Satara and Shingwedzi (at a point midway between Letaba and Punda Maria).
Further rest hut accommodation is provided at Malopene and Rabelais entrance gates, primarily for those who arrive at these points too late in the day to enable them to reach an interior camp within half an hour after sunset.
At Pafuri, visitors are quartered under canvas, and at some of the larger camps cottage tents are used when sightseers in especially large numbers cause an overflow.

Application for rest hut accommodation is made on the spot to whoever is in charge of the camp.
The great majority of the huts are of concrete or brick, with thatched roofs, and the furnishing consists of riempie or other bedsteads, with mattresses, a table, benches or chairs, a washstand and basin and a hurricane lamp.
Bedding is obtainable on hire at rest camps, except at Olifants River Causeway, Olifants Gorge and Pafuri, where food is likewise not supplied.
The charge is two shillings and sixpence for the first night for three blankets, two sheets, and two pillows and one shilling and sixpence for the same bedding for each subsequent night and ten shillings if the requirement is for a week.
Winter nights are are frequently cold and visitors should carry rugs and overcoats.
A torch will be found useful and further needs will be towels and a mirror such not being part of the hut equipment.

The rest hut fee is three shillings and sixpence nightly for each adult and two shillings for each visitor under sixteen.
There is a reduction if accommodation is booked for a week at least.
The charge for tent "housing" is less than that applying to the huts.
The rate for the visitor sleeping within the camp, but not desiring rest hut or tent accommodation is one shilling and sixpence a night (children under sixteen, ninepence each) and the payment covers the service of native attendants and the use of water and fires.
Sightseers are not permitted to "outspan" and spend the night other than at a rest camp.

Stores are established at Skukuza, Pretorius Kop, Letaba, Punda Maria and Satara, and at them certain everyday commodities and even lesser luxuries are purchasable - the supplies offered including a variety of tinned meats, tea, coffee, sugar, jams, bread, butter, cheese, eggs, condensed milk, alt, potatoes, onions, chocolates and sweets generally, cold drinks, cigarettes, candles and soap.
At these stores, and at the rest camps at Crocodile Bridge, Lower Sabi, Malelane and Shingwedzi, meals are obtainable, the charges approximating to those ruling generally at South African country hotels.
Cutlery and cooking utensils are procurable from stores.

Entrances - the park is entered at Crocodile Bridge, reached from Komatipoort; Malelane, reached from Barberton and Nelspruit; Pretorius Kop reached from White River and Graskop; Rabelais, reached from Graskop and Acornhoek; Malopene, reached from Leydsdorp and Gravelotte and Punda Maria, reached from Louis Trichardt.

A pontoon is in operation at Crocodile Bridge rest camp, for the crossing of the Crocodile River.
The charge for transporting a car by it is three shillings, and the levy for a lorry or vehicle with a trailer is six shillings, but the pont is closed to lorries which, with their loads, exceed three tons in weight, and also to other vehicles likely to cause damage to it.

Concrete causeways have been built across some watercourses.
The rivers thus bridged are the Crocodile, Letaba, Olifants and Sand, also the Sabi which is crossed by causeway at Skukuza and Lower Sabi.
These passageways are too narrow to permit of cars passing one another on them, and a speed of ten miles an hour must not be exceeded on the causeways.

In normal times the management of the South African Railways makes attractive provision for travel to and in the park.
Tours by special train are widely popular.
They are on all-inclusive lines, and provide for two or three days of car travel in the sanctuary, camp-fire concerts and other exhilarating and novel enjoyments.
In addition, weekend tours and party and individual excursions, in all cases including meals and bedding on trains, park entrance charges, sightseeing and other motor journeys as desired, and accommodation and allied requirements generally, are expertly arranged.


I know it was a long read - but also very interesting!

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sat Jun 04, 2005 5:23 pm 
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One of my fondest memories of the 80s was caravanning at Skukuza, standing around a humongous fire build out of logs. When it was our turn the fire operator would spade a large amount of coals into a wheelbarrow for us to take back to the fireplace - instant braai (barbecue). Now you pay a premium for hard, long-burning wood.

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 05, 2005 10:46 am 
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Penny wrote:
At a cost of two pounds a season ticket is obtainable at all of the park's entrance gates (((((((Now we know where they got the idea for the Wildcard)))))) The purchaser is entitled repeatedly to enter any open part of the sanctuary during the twelve months to which the ticket applies.


That very interesting

Penny wrote:
Holders of the Kruger Park's Life Fellowship, for which a contribution of twenty-five pounds is made to the funds of the National Parks Board of Trustees, have free entry to all reserves, when open, controlled by the Board. They also receive, free of charge, certain tickets covering accommodation at rest huts.


I wonder how many were bought? And if the holders were still alive if the agreement would be honoured?

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Sep 13, 2006 2:10 pm 
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What wonderful memories! I can remember we mostly stayed in Letaba.
The camp was fenced with the normal diamond mesh.
Staff went from hut to hut to light the hurricane lamps and also spray your hut for mosquitoes with one of those funny pump action insecticide contraptions. (don't know what it's called).

The camp shop also closed between 14:00 to 16:00 if i can remember correctly and then also opened only to 18:00.
Bad luck if you were held up by a road block, you just had to go without until the shop opens the next day. Long life milk was sold in a glass bottle and wasn't so tasty as the long life you can purchase these days.
Only basic items were available from the camp shops.

At picnic spots they had a fire going all day to provide hot water in a big kettle.
I am not to sure if it was at Balule (was too young to really take notice of the routes :redface: ) there was a warden that accompanied visitors down to the river to look at the hippos and crocs.
We had to walk down to the river through thick bush and underneath trees.


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Unread postPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2006 4:00 pm 
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My earliest memory was when my Dads secretary married Henry Wolhuter (son of the famous knife lion killer Harry) Henry was then Section Ranger at Pretoriuskop and we visited them at the Rangers house just outside P Kop gate where it still is today. On the lawn was a pram with a sleeping baby in it (It was none other than world renowned Wild life film maker Kim Wolhuter. ) I can remember the skin of the famous lion and the knife hanging on the wall of the house long before it went to the still to be built Stevenson Hamilton Library. Henry told me the story how his dad was knocked off his horse and dragged by the lion and then stabbing it to death with his knife and then spending a painful night in the tree while the 2nd lion returned after an unsuccessful chase of his horse. Being a little 7 year old boy from JHB I was enthralled and Henry could see that so when my dad came down to do audits at Hectorspruit I would be dropped off for the july school holidays at the Wolhuters and I spent 3 glorious weeks walking in the bush with "a real Ranger" as I used to boast to my envious School mates. I had a wonderful childhood in the wilds of Kruger and Sabi Sands and I was extremely lucky to have been given the same opportunity with my own sons who spent many weeks in the bush with me with the next generation of Rangers. Its something they will never forget and something I was very glad I could give them

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2006 10:57 pm 
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Aquilla wrote:
I have the same memory of a guard escorting us down to the waters edge....all very exciting for a young lad in the early 70;s.

I have no idea where it was. I have been told that it was at Hippo Pools near Croc Bridge....i went there and recognised nothing!!!!


It was near the hippo pools now , but a few hundred metres further back up the road ,
when you pass some big trees , this is where you used to park , you will see the road is wider here .


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2006 11:56 am 
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Other than those really old pictures, which are REALLY old, my memories come from the late 50's and 60's when each year we would drive from Scottburgh/Durban all the way to Kruger for our Xmas holiday.
In those days it was quite a trip.
We would always have a meat pie in White River -why did I always get the clove- and buy all our supplies as there was only tinned food in Kruger.

There were refrigerated lockers to keep the meat cold at the camps and you had to walk to the loo at night after listening to everyone talk about hyenas in camp around the camp-fire!

You always knew what everyone else had seen because you kept meeting people in the bathrooms, the kitchen and at the fire.

You would always have all the car windows open - no a/c and my brother would sit on the window sill (it was okay then!!) and spot.
Once he broke the child safe window which would then not wind up and when we got close to baboons, he made me sit there!!
For the new folks, the baboons always climbed onto your car in the old days.

The car broke down regularly, and when my dad got out to try and make repairs we would all be terrified he would be eaten.

We did not have that many braais as the quality of the meat was not great, (especially when not kept properly refrigerated) but would put the stewing meat with veg into the old black communal camp stove at lunch ready for dinner, to be eaten with lots of rice.
One night my mother tripped in the pitch dark - no lights - and dropped the dinner.
With no restaurant or food anywhere and with 5 hungry mouths, she kept her mouth shut, scraped up the top layer, added a can of baked beans and popped it back into the oven.
Game reserve stew is a favourite to this day - recipe on request - and totally fool proof.

We would regularly get trapped on the Salitje road by huge herds of buffalo or wildebeest trying to get back to camp at night.

A day out in Kruger consisted of driving from Skukuza to Tshokwane, where there was a pit toilet and the sausage tree thatch with a fire and hot water.
After sandwiches and tea, the long dusty road back to Skukuza again.
There was one tree which was famous because it always seemed to have a male lion underneath it.
This was before they built all the dams so it was a long dry trip.

We never went to the North as the park was closed at that time of year.

Ok, I'd better stop as I already feel about hundred years old, and could probably carry on for hours!!
But must ask, does anyone else remember the big bags of elephant biltong?


Rose

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2006 7:47 pm 
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Yup , still remeber the biltong - and the bun fight to get to it before it was all sold out :lol:

Ahh yes , they old tshokwane - we had a touch of it this year when we got there really early and had brekfast before all the other people came and tuned it into the mini market mall effect it is now :lol:


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Unread postPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2006 11:27 pm 
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Fantastic memories, Rose.
You can still buy elephant biltong in the park today although I dont think it's from South African elephants. It's normally sold in a brown paper bag with the details of the contents written on with felt tip. Think it comes from Namibia. It is delicious!


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2006 7:51 am 
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Tshokwane, where there was a pit toilet and the sausage tree thatch with a fire and hot water. After sandwiches and tea, the long dusty road back to Skukuza again.


And as we sat drinking our mugs of "koffiehuis" we fiercely debated the issue of the main roads being tarred, convinced that this would ruin the entire atmosphere at KNP.

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2006 1:45 pm 
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This is my second shot as the first one got lost – teach me to write essays! :cry:

Visiting KNP in the late 60’s, early 70’s, as a teenage girl, from about 14 to about 19 years old, with my sister Lizanne, two years older, and my divorced Mother, gave me some pretty unique experiences.
We had been going to Kruger all our lives and our entertainment consisted of playing card games, listening to my mother’s tales about her time as a locum in South-West Africa and begging her for the next episode in the incredible stories that always seemed to be stopped, just when you had to know what happened next. But that changed as we grew up.

At that time, no single women were employed in KNP, and there were many, many young men working on the construction of the NEW tar roads and working in the park.
We sometimes felt they must be radioing ahead (no phones in those days) to our next camp as we often had barely closed the hut door when some young man was knocking on the door.

‘Tannie, can your two dogters come to the braai/pool/party tonight please?’
My Mother would put on here sternest face, ask about chaperones, issue instructions on curfews and drinking and when they seemed sufficiently intimidated would give permission.
Lizanne and I were invariably killing ourselves laughing behind the door, as my mother worked full time and we had been going on holiday alone to our Dad for years without this amount of supervision.
My Mom knew what she was doing, though, and we were treated like Queens by these young men. :)

As you can imagine, the competition to have some young thing hanging on your every word brought out the best and the most gory Kruger stories, so how much is true is anyone’s guess.
I will definitely be contributing to camp fire stories!!
But this one is true, so here it stays.

My most memorable evening was spent at the Skukuza staff pool in the company of a young man named Les.
The only guest pool at the time was at P’kop, so an invite to the staff pool was pounced on and he was quite a dish and at least 20, so my little heart was fluttering.
The evening started with a sighting of a hyena – my first night drive animal – and after the swim he spent hours telling us stories.

He had just finished a story about one evening when they switched on the lights in the Skukuza staff village club-house to change the movie reel and noticed there was a pride of lions sitting at the glass windows watching the movie with them, when REAL lions starting roaring.
REALLY LOUD! :shock:

It was pretty scary, but after all the pool was fenced in much better than the camp fencing, with a good strong game gate!

‘Ok folks, time to go.’ came Les’s voice. ‘Aren’t we safe here?’ from me. ‘Oh, no, the lions drink here regularly, they just jump the game gate, and they’ll probably be here in about 30 minutes.’
I clutched Les’s hand very tightly on the long walk back in the pitch dark to the cars parked in the CLUB-HOUSE parking lot!!
Lizanne was much braver than me and asked if we could go looking for the lions, so we drove to the golf course!
I wanted no such thing, seeing a lion in day-light is one thing, but at night!!
Thank goodness we didn’t see any!! (Yes, I am a wimp, but I could tell you lion stories that would make your hair stand on end!!)

The next morning, my mother said, ‘Rose, what were you dreaming about, you kept calling “Les, Les, help me, ….etc, etc” Oy!!
Every holiday to KNP thereafter, I was teased mercilessly. :redface: (Les, if you’re reading this, know I remember you fondly to this day!)

Anyway, I don’t know whether you are bored to tears to this, but if you want more, let me know – I seem to recall Les telling us something about a leopard…. (I have my Mother’s example to follow after all)

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