Skip to Content

Guides of Selous

Enjoy, participate and learn from the quiz forum. Post your quiz here for others to enjoy as well

Moderator: RosemaryH

User avatar
Imberbe
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Posts: 14456
Joined: Wed Aug 31, 2005 12:28 am
Location: Pretoria, RSA

Guides of Selous

Unread postby Imberbe » Thu Sep 10, 2009 9:11 am

Guides of Selous.

With thanks to SANParks management and the forum moderators we are opening a new thread. This thread is aimed at assisting a group of guides called the “Guides of Selous”. This group consist of guides working and living in one of the camps in Selous Game Reserve, Tanzania.

Guide training in Tanzania is basic, standards are low and primary and secondary education opportunities are limited. Most of the guides have been brought up in Tanzania and did their training with one of the local training academies. Only the basics are taught and after that they start working.

Self study is difficult as they often don’t have books or access to the internet. In camp they have access to the internet only for short periods of time, but the internet is slow and many of them don’t know how to use it. Searching internet sites is time consuming and demands technical understanding as well as having to cross check information in order to identify accurate information and discard wrong information.

So, we want to help these guides:

In this thread the guides will post questions and ask for your help to find the correct answer.

There are so many passionate and knowledgeable forumites, so we hope that they will learn from you and get a better understanding of our wonderful world, and specifically of the ‘bush’.

Many thanks for your help!

Selous Guides
Jaap van Dijk



Basic rules of this thread:

1. Only the Selous guides will be able to post questions here.
2. Anyone may answer, but please do not speculate.
3. This thread will be heavily moderated for accuracy.
4. Please note that there may be differences in ecology and animal behaviour between S.A. and Tanzania.
5. Please limit discussions to one or two issues at a time.
6. Keep your information short, accurate and simple. Please do not re-post large amounts of information copied from websites.
Imberbe = Combretum imberbe = Leadwood = Hardekool = The spirit of the Wildernis!

Want to know more about the SANParks Honorary Rangers? Visit www.sanparksvolunteers.org


One positive deed is worth more than a thousand critical words.

User avatar
RUMURUTI
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 1868
Joined: Thu Feb 12, 2009 11:54 pm
Location: Milano (Italy) - IT ALL STARTED WITH A FOOTSTEP!
Contact:

Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby RUMURUTI » Thu Sep 10, 2009 10:07 am

Imberbe, superb!
I have actually worked in Tanzania and even in the Selous region and still have a brother living/working in Tanzania.
The situation there is pretty drastic and they need all the help they can find.
"You can leave Africa but Africa never leaves you"
LIFE IS MADE OF GOOD AND BAD THINGS, I TAKE THE GOOD AND YOU CAN KEEP THE BAD!!!
Andy Benaglia

User avatar
Imberbe
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Posts: 14456
Joined: Wed Aug 31, 2005 12:28 am
Location: Pretoria, RSA

Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Imberbe » Thu Sep 10, 2009 2:36 pm

Welcome to all the Selous guides!

We are looking forward to having you post here. Please do not be hesitant to ask your questions. We will do our best to answer or get the answers.

It is great having you all here! :dance:
Imberbe = Combretum imberbe = Leadwood = Hardekool = The spirit of the Wildernis!

Want to know more about the SANParks Honorary Rangers? Visit www.sanparksvolunteers.org


One positive deed is worth more than a thousand critical words.

User avatar
G@mespotter
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
Posts: 1608
Joined: Thu Mar 02, 2006 12:11 pm
Location: Back on earth.....
Contact:

Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby G@mespotter » Thu Sep 10, 2009 5:05 pm

O...K... 8)

And the question is....??? I'm ready :roll: :lol:
Tambotie 20 July, Shipandane Birdhide 21 July, Mphongolo Backpack Trail 22 -25 July, Tzendze 26 July, and Greater Limpopo National Park 27 -29 July :D

Scipio
Posts: 4757
Joined: Fri Sep 07, 2007 11:22 am

Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Scipio » Thu Sep 10, 2009 6:00 pm

GS, Selous is special, but also different to Kruger :whistle: . this is great for the forum IMHO. 8)

User avatar
Guides of Selous
Posts: 128
Joined: Thu Sep 10, 2009 6:35 am
Location: Selous Game Reserve - Tanzania

Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Guides of Selous » Fri Sep 11, 2009 6:02 am

Hi to all Forumites,

Thanks for the warm welcome!
We are all standing around the computer and checking out the site.

We are looking forward to start asking questions and meeting new people!

Lets start with one question in general.
Later we will introduce ourselves shorly when posting a question.

Guides of Selous:
Mzee Haule, Benard, Fanuel, Furahini, Oscar, Diamon, Erick, Whiteman.

Question: Sept-09
Why there is only big baobab not smaller ones? (By Whiteman)- We only see here big baobabs and do not find any small baobabs.

Many thanks

Selous Guides,
Mzee Haule, Benard, Fanuel, Furahini, Oscar, Diamon, Erick, Whiteman.

User avatar
Kamadejo
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 18312
Joined: Fri Jul 24, 2009 9:51 am
Location: Germany, busy planning next trip

Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Kamadejo » Fri Sep 11, 2009 7:01 am

:hmz: Has is something to do with the high elephant population, as they break open the bark of the trees and the ecological succession isn't sufficient.
Katja

____________
Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I’m not sure about the former. Einstein

Kamadejo returns to KNP after 7 years
Balm for the Soul

User avatar
Timepilot
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 3734
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2008 2:02 am
Location: Perth, Western Australia

Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Timepilot » Fri Sep 11, 2009 7:42 am

Hi Guys and welcome to the forums!! :thumbs_up:

I think KV could be correct. Research suggests that, in East African National Parks, reduction in the baobab population could be directly related to the increased elephant browsing. Additionally, extended droughts may prevent regeneration of the seeds

There is also the problem of recognising the young baobab as it does not resemble the full grown plant being skinny and with a different leaf structure.

A suggestion has been to look around settled areas as baobab trees may be deliberately planted which will indicate that they are regenerating in areas where water is available and where overbrowsing cannot occur.
“ Every year elephants were becoming scarcer and wilder south of the Zambezi, so that it had become impossible to make a living by hunting at all. ” FC Selous 1881

User avatar
Imberbe
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Posts: 14456
Joined: Wed Aug 31, 2005 12:28 am
Location: Pretoria, RSA

Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Imberbe » Fri Sep 11, 2009 9:47 am

:D Good question and good having you here! :thumbs_up:

I want to agree with what has already been posted.

I do think that it is probably a combination of factors that causes this. Things in nature is often a bit more complicated than just having one answer. It is often rather a combination of factors that causes something.

I would add that you have to take the Baobabs ecology in to account as well. Unlike many other plants, which has a fast reproduction rate and a relatively short life cycle, the Baobab has an extremely long life cycle. Trees can become 3000 to 4000 years old. They do not need to rush to reproduce. If they were to produce only one adult tree for each 100 years of their live, they would have been extremely successful and leave around 40 offspring. How many of you can do that? :lol:

So in a natural setting they will not produce the same number of young trees that is visible to you as say an acacia tree.

Now, if you have heavy elephant impact in an area (and they love Baobab) they will easily remove the few young Baobab that is growing. In the long term this can have a negative effect on the Baobab population, especially if they start having an impact on the adult trees as well, and in this way start limiting the numbers of seeds available.

Another more complicated explanation could be local climate change. Now this is purely speculation, but interesting to think about. It could be that you are in an area that use to be ideal Baobab climate. The right temperature and rainfall, etc. But there might have been a slight change, which means that it is not that ideal anymore, making it difficult for the younger trees to survive. The big trees are strong, and can manage to survive in less than ideal circumstance. As I say, this is merely speculation.
Imberbe = Combretum imberbe = Leadwood = Hardekool = The spirit of the Wildernis!

Want to know more about the SANParks Honorary Rangers? Visit www.sanparksvolunteers.org


One positive deed is worth more than a thousand critical words.

User avatar
jaapvandijk
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 269
Joined: Thu Feb 24, 2005 10:09 pm
Location: Tanzania, Selous Game Reserve

Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby jaapvandijk » Fri Sep 11, 2009 11:39 am

Hi to all,

Thanks for all the enthusiastic reactions and for the help!

Let me quickly explain something about the question numbers.

Question Sept-09 is the 9th question in September the guides have put on the blackboard. These questions are copied by all guides in a 'blackboard logbook' and an answer need to be found.
The answer has to be written down and copied by all guides again.
This way stimulating them to share knowledge, making it a team effort and it is a structural way of learning while one question should be written on the board per day.
A part of their training/work here in camp.

I will try to get them into the office this evening to read the answers and reply.
Most of them are out on safaris at the moment.

Jaap
Watching the slow flow of the river. A continues movement of water down towards the ocean. Like blood flowing through a vein, keeping the body alive.

User avatar
Guides of Selous
Posts: 128
Joined: Thu Sep 10, 2009 6:35 am
Location: Selous Game Reserve - Tanzania

Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Guides of Selous » Fri Sep 11, 2009 6:03 pm

hi
my name is Oscar. thank you for your help.
I am one of the guides of Selous. i have been working here for 2 years now.
i have been guiding since june this year.
i did a 3 month course with Veta Mikumi, Morogoro -Tanzania.

i have a question about elephants.

Sept 15:
how many different muscles do elephant trunk have?
thanks
Oscar

User avatar
Kamadejo
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 18312
Joined: Fri Jul 24, 2009 9:51 am
Location: Germany, busy planning next trip

Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Kamadejo » Fri Sep 11, 2009 6:14 pm

They have over forty thousand individual muscles :lol:
Katja

____________
Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I’m not sure about the former. Einstein

Kamadejo returns to KNP after 7 years
Balm for the Soul

User avatar
Guides of Selous
Posts: 128
Joined: Thu Sep 10, 2009 6:35 am
Location: Selous Game Reserve - Tanzania

Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Guides of Selous » Fri Sep 11, 2009 6:31 pm

Jambo/Hi
my name is Furahini, I am the one of the guides of Selous..
I would like to thank you for your help. :clap:
I have been working for 2 years, As a guide after being trained at the National College of Tourism- Tanzania.
I have a question conserning about Crocodiles.

question:
What is the maximum speed of a crocodile in the water AND on the land?

thanks
Furahini
guides of Selous

User avatar
Micetta
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 9542
Joined: Wed Oct 08, 2008 3:56 pm
Location: CH - Lugano

Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Micetta » Fri Sep 11, 2009 6:39 pm

Jambo,

Maximum speed attained when galloping is about 18 km/h, but only for short bursts.

The swimming speed is estimated up to 10 kph, but quicker for a short burst. :D

User avatar
Siobain
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
Posts: 5215
Joined: Wed Feb 25, 2009 9:38 pm
Location: Johannesburg

Re: Guides of Selous

Unread postby Siobain » Sat Sep 12, 2009 6:41 pm

Hi Jambo, really nice to talk to you. :D

Bear in mind that crocodiles do not normally chase their prey, their typical
hunting strategy is one of surprise, lunging at their prey to capture it and
they are masters of a surprise attack. If you see them running it is usually back to water.


Great question. :thumbs_up:
He is rich or poor according to what he is, not according to what he has. ~Henry Ward Beecher


Return to “Quizzes”