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Books about Kruger National Park

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francoisd
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Unread postby francoisd » Fri Jul 01, 2005 1:23 pm

Guinea Pig wrote:Which of the historical sites in the north are accessible to the public?

Thulamela archeological site. I think you have to arrange with Punda reception for the guide to meet you there. Have not visited it myself yet
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Unread postby wildtuinman » Fri Jul 01, 2005 1:24 pm

Guinea Pig wrote:Which of the historical sites in the north are accessible to the public?


Masorini is one and the other is there near the Nyala loop. Thulamela.
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The Kruger National Park: A social and political history

Unread postby Krokodile » Tue Jul 05, 2005 7:05 pm

The Kruger National Park: A social and political history

Just finished reading this thought-provoking book written by Jane Carruthers and published by the University of Natal press in 1995.

The book is bound to be viewed as controversial, as it offers a completely different perspective on the KNP based on the circumstances which led to the Park's creation and the pressures which have been put on it since through the influence of politics. An example of this is the story of Paul Kruger's involvement in the creation of the Park. According to the author, Kruger's passion for wildlife is a myth created in the 1940's, and the Park had been named after the person who really brought it into being, we would today be visiting the Loveday National Park!

A very interesting read, with some good historic photo's. I don't know if it is still in print, but if not, maybe you can get a copy through your local library.

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Unread postby bwana » Wed Jul 06, 2005 11:20 am

Very nice. Bought mine from Skukuza only to get back home and find a page in the middle of the book that is torn! :x :( :cry:
Otherwise a very good buy with some beautiful photographs and some interesting reading. Pricey @ R350. Could have probably got it cheaper elsewhere though.

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Unread postby fevertree » Mon Sep 12, 2005 8:36 am

The book - "Place Names of the Kruger National Park" is now available at Exclusive Books. It is one of the most interesting books I have come across and will definitely be accompanying me on all my trips to the Park. I am sure once the Forum members all start getting hold of it, there will be LOTS of discussions around it. A really great pice of work!!
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Excellent publication on the scientific side of Kruger

Unread postby fevertree » Tue Oct 11, 2005 1:28 pm

For anyone who wishes to have a scientific understanding on the management of the Kruger ecosystem, the following book is a great study.
The Kruger Experience - Ecology and Management of Savanna Heterogeneity. Edited by J. Du Toit, K. Rogers and H. Biggs, Island Press.
I ordered mine through Exclusive Books, but I am sure for all of you living in the city you would be able to find it on their shelves.
It highlights the latest policies in the Park with regards to environmental management and places all the issues of culling, fire, water provision etc. into perspective from an ecosystem point of view.
It is not an easy bed time read, but a scientific manual, well worth the effort though.
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Unread postby fevertree » Fri Oct 14, 2005 11:28 am

When I finished reading through it for the first time - I was struck by the enormous task that rests on the shoulders of the KNP managemernt to keep the park going - especially the last chapters that look at human influences on and around the park. When you realise all the threats to the Park, internal and external then you can only take your hat off to the park managers. Comment was made on another thread about Mr. Mabunda's salary. I would gladly grant him that salary if you see what he achieved in steering the park through some very turbulent times after the political changes in South Africa post 1994.
Internally, you realise just how sensitive the Kruger ecosystem is to changes in the environment, and also how much there still is to learn from it.
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Books about KNP history

Unread postby etienne » Wed Nov 16, 2005 8:52 am

:wink: I must have read "South African Eden" by James Stevenson-Hamilton about a dozen times (maybe more!). What an excellent book about the history of the Park! :D Does anybody know where I can get a copy of "Memories of a Game Ranger" by Harry Wolhuter :?: I am not sure if it is still available in print. I am also looking for other books related to the history of Kruger.

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Unread postby francoisd » Thu Jan 05, 2006 2:57 pm

On our previous visits to Kruger we always happened to be at Masorini on times outisde tour times. On our last visit in Nov 2004 we were greeted with a sign that said that no tours are available till further notice.

Does anyone know if they have tours available now and also what times they leave the picnic area for the site
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The Kruger National Park. L.E.O. Braack

Unread postby bert » Thu Jan 26, 2006 11:05 pm

I am the lucky owner of a Kruger guide
The Kruger National Park. L.E.O. Braack
Pub 1986
Struik
ISBN 0 86977 1426

Great to read on Kruger in those days.
A quote:The Park is rapidly approaching the level where it can take no more visitors without intruding on the concept that this is a wilderness area, to be preserved etc.

Even then, the same concerns we have now.

Another interesting thing is that he mentioned that the elephant culling program has been introduced to stabilize the population to 7.500.

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Unread postby halfbob » Thu Mar 02, 2006 11:21 pm

Guinea Pig wrote:Which of the historical sites in the north are accessible to the public?


At Parfuri last July they had a resident Paleo Anthropologist who accompanied us on a drive one morning. We went to a site in the Makuleke concession which had been inhabited by Homo Erectus. The PA showed us examples of hand axes just laying around on the ground. This was not a controlled site but you'd have to know what you were looking for or you wouldn't know you were there.

I think the PA Guide was an experiment so don't know if they still offer his services.

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Pride of South Africa

Unread postby Oumie » Wed Apr 05, 2006 6:06 pm

Did another bookself cleanout and found another little book written by Kenneth Newman - published in 1976, all about Kruger Park and its animals, birds and camps. There were a series of these little books, but we could only find no 21 at the time :(
Croc Bridge 17/4 - 19/4
Lower Sabie 20/4 to 10/5
Satara 11/5 to 17/5
Letaba 18/5 to 24/5
Shingwedzi 25/5 to 31/5
Tsendze 1/6 to 4/6
Satara 5/6 to 7/6
Maroela 8/6 to 11/6

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Unread postby luislang » Sun Apr 09, 2006 2:59 pm

Bert
I also have this book. Bought it in the 80's in Kruger. Did you know that there are new additions?
Publisher: New Holland Publishers (UK)
ISBN: 1843306697
Format: Soft Cover
Publication Date: 2003/12

It sells for R16.00 on www.Kalahari.net. (Pocket Size)

Then there's another one by Braack also published in 2003 called
Kruger National Park Pack. Selling for R95.96.
Same Publishers ISBN:1843306654. Also sold by Kalahari.net.
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Kruger Portrait of a Nat Park

Unread postby Snoobab » Mon May 08, 2006 8:07 am

Hi All

In another post Nico asked if I knew of how many workers were killed while building roads and so on in early Kruger.
Kruger Portrait of a National Park - David Paynter with Wilf Nussey. Macmillian South Africa (Publishers) Pty Ltd 1986
For those of you Kruger holics this is an amazing book. The first half deals with the history of Kruger from Primevil to Present. It then deals with all the camps and roads and the problems faced. There is a section on all Fauna and Flora. The section titles Sagas of the Park is very interesting with topics like -
Wolhunter and the Lion
Mdluli - a Park Legend
The great Tuskers of the Park
There is a section for visitor hints which is quite helpful with a photography hint section.
The last section is similar to Nigel Dennis's book on Where to find Game in Kruger as it list all camps and roads and explains which game should be seen where.
bearing in mind the book is 20 yrs old and a lot has changed in Kruger it is still very interesting.
Some of the pics of the old camps and picnic sites are amazing.
Not too sure if it is still in publication but if it is you should all try get a copy.

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Unread postby Shidzidzii » Mon May 08, 2006 9:01 am

This was the first comprehensive guide book on the KNP and remains a classic , and a model for later authors including Nigel Dennis to follow . It was more of a coffee table book, being large and heavy, than a field guide so Dr LEO Braaks "Kruger Park Guide" book is beter in that respect and pre-dates it.

Wilf Nussey also published the first major book on the Kalahari NP in a similar format.

It would be nice if a revised edition could be published . Some of the points of difference being:-
- only 3 wilderness trails those days
- only the original camps where described but Berg-en_Dal Boulders Roodewal and Jock-of-Bushveld had just been developed
- only one bird hide then (Kanniedood)
- the roads where already at their zenith (time we had a road developement plan ?) and their descriptions are still very apt


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