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Animal Behaviour

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ngala
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Animal Behaviour

Unread postby ngala » Tue Apr 19, 2005 10:14 am

have you also wondered how and why animals do what they do ?

"Creatures of habit" by Peter Apps and Richard du Toit
"Wild Ways" by Peter Apps

I really love these 2 books with lots of information on african animal behaviour and really beautiful photography from Richard du Toit in "Creatures of habit".

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Re: Books on african animal behaviour

Unread postby madach » Tue Apr 19, 2005 5:26 pm

Another very good book about animal behaviour is "The Behaviour Guide to African Mammals" by Richard Despard Estes (ISBN: 1-875091-10-6).

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animal behaviour

Unread postby fevertree » Tue Apr 26, 2005 4:44 pm

There is also a rather old publication which was excellent - Kruger National Park, Questions and Answers.
It handled animal behaviour patterns, as well as a wide range of other topics.
I have no idea why this book was discontinued. I found it excellent to learn from as a child, and it answered hundreds of questions that we ask each day in the Park. If you have acopy of this book, great, it is a real gem.
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Beat About The Bush

Unread postby Imberbe » Mon Sep 05, 2005 1:39 am

I have just read a brilliant new book called "BEAT ABOUT THE BUSH", written by Trevor Carnaby. This book is a must for field guides and everyone interested in nature.

Carnaby writes about Mammal and Bird behaviour in such a fresh and informative way, that he succeeds in keeping you wanting to read more. The book is written in a question and answer format.

Some questions he answers are:

Do giraffe lie down?
How does the elephant's trunk work?
Are hyraxes really related to elephant?
Why do spur-winged geese have spurs?

Carnaby's experience as a field guide shows! He dispels a few myths, and keep you interested by sharing a lot of personal experiences. The book is filled with a lot of photos that illustrates his points.

BEAT ABOUT THE BUSH is published by Jacanamaps. Na die beste van my wete is hy ongelukkig net in engels beskikbaar.
:)

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Unread postby Imberbe » Mon Sep 05, 2005 10:57 pm

BEAT ABOUT THE BUSH is published by Jacana. ISBN 1-77009-096-7.

marketing@jacana.co.za
www.jacana.co.za

Good luck! :wink:

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Unread postby francoisd » Fri Sep 30, 2005 8:51 am

(The text below was scanned in so I hope the OCR software got everything right)

Why do warthogs drop to their knees to feed?
This is more common in winter when most of their food is underground and needs to be dug up. The disc at the end of the nose and the tushes (tusks) are used. The digging is more easily accomplished while the warthogs are on their knees, as more leverage and resultant digging efficiency are obtained, especially in harder soils.

Warthogs are the only 'pigs' in Africa to exhibit this phenomenon, and the reason for it may lie in the fact that they are the only ones that live and mostly graze in open savannah. The other species, like bushpig, live in the forest and generally have enough food in the form of fallen fruits, and other goods in the winter. Rooting at this time takes up less of their day, and the litter and soil are generally softer than on the sunbaked open areas where warthogs live. In winter warthogs rely almost entirely on rooting to find adequate and sufficient food, and spend most of their time doing this. This puts a strain on the animal, which is alleviated by dropping to the knees and resting while rooting, and possibly creates greater leverage with which to dig in hard soils. Thus the knees have developed heavy callouses. Warthogs, having to work relatively harder to obtain food than their forest relatives, spend a lot of time on their knees for comfort and convenience, if not out of necessity. One could then ask why they do not have much shorter front legs to facilitate this strategy, but such a feature would make them vulnerable to attack and less agile in escape.

Why do bats hang upside down?
Essentially because their legs are too weak to hold their body weight. This has occurred as a result of adaptations to fill their particular niche as mammals. Bats are the only mammals that fly. As in birds, weight-saving mechanisms evolve to make flight possible. Most birds have hollow bones but have minimal reduction (in most species) of the legs as they need them for perching and walking about in search of food. Bats have followed a different route altogether. Rather than having feathers (which are modified scales that hint at birds' reptilian ancestors),
they have developed extensive but light, membranous wings, have kept the solid bones, but have reduced on the one thing that was not of prime importance - their legs! Because most bats are feeders of aerial insects which they catch on the wing, they can afford this, and so have adapted their wings (forelimbs) to have claws (hooks). Because birds have occupied most of the niches for flying, bats compete by hunting at night (when most birds are inactive) and use their claws to hang rather than perch. The legs in insect-eating varieties are, therefore, rudimentary and not capable of holding the animal's weight (cumbersome shuffling being the only movement of these limbs). Fruit-eating bats still need some locomotive ability of the legs to aid in clambering around for fruit - but they are nowhere near as agile as birds.

Why do oxpeckers sit on mammals?
Why do comb ducks (knob-billed ducks) have knob bills?
Why do hamerkops have such big nests?

These are just some of the questions answered in a new book I bought last night called "Beat about the bush: Animals and birds"

Book information:
Author: Trevor Carnaby
Publisher: Jacana
ISBN: 1-77009-096-7

I bought it at Wordsworth for R277.00

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Last edited by francoisd on Tue Apr 25, 2006 10:33 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Beat about the Bush, Mammals-Trevor Carnaby

Unread postby Meandering Mouse » Fri Mar 30, 2007 7:14 am

This is a lovely, lively accompaniment to any mammal guide, 370 pages of knowledge.
It is packed with information on animal behaviour, there is a global categorisation of animals and the occasional anecdote of unusual animal sightings. In addition there is a concise section on animal tracking.
It is easy to read and well illustrated.
The bird doesn't sing because it has answers, it sings because it has a song.

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Unread postby Imberbe » Sat Mar 31, 2007 1:27 am

This is one of the best books you could ever buy regarding mammals! Lots of detail but very relevant and interesting. Gives info regarding behaviour, social structure, biology, spoor etc. 8)

An easy read! :D

A goldmine to anyone interested in nature!

BUY THIS BOOK!
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Unread postby Freda » Tue Apr 03, 2007 5:48 am

macho mouse wrote:Is there an equivalant on birds?

If there is, let me be first in the queue :!:


Try Sasol's 'Birds - The Inside Story', MM, it is full of lots of information :D
ISBN 1-77007-151-2

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Imberbe
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Unread postby Imberbe » Tue Apr 03, 2007 8:42 am

macho mouse wrote:Is there an equivalant on birds?

If there is, let me be first in the queue :!:


The initial book (Beat About the Bush) had a section on birds. In the new expanded edition (2006) the birds have been taken out and it is only on mammals. Hence it is now called "Beat About the Bush: Mammals".

This is however not bad news, since the reason for this is that he is working on "Beat About the Bush: Birds". Which, judging by the contents of the first edition, should also be brilliant.

The "Beat About the Bush" series has a unique character in that it is almost as if you are on a walk with the author in the bush. (He is a Field Guide.) He takes you to specific happenings and explains them to you.

The above mentioned "Birds: The inside story" is also a very informative and excellent book. So now you have something to keep you interested till "Beat about the Bush: Birds" is published. (Sorry, I do not know when that will be.)
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Unread postby Johann » Tue Apr 03, 2007 9:16 am

Like Imberbe said the original title is out of print and you'll struggle to find a copy. Have look at the Jacana Media website. Found the quote below on there.

Jacana Media wrote:Trevor is currently developing the Beat About the Bush concept into a series including mammals, birds, insects & plants and amphibians & reptiles.
Last edited by Johann on Mon Sep 03, 2007 8:36 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Animal Behaviour

Unread postby evolvingape » Fri Oct 03, 2008 10:43 am

I would recommend Krebs and Davies "Introduction to behavioral ecology". It might be a bit scientific, but it sure widens ones views. You will not look at an animal the same way again...

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Re: Animal Behaviour

Unread postby CaliforniaGirl » Sun Oct 12, 2008 1:21 am

Here in California :roll: we have to resort to Amazon or the public library for our African animal books. Imagine my surprise when searching the library I found one I first discovered in a KNP shop and purchased for some friends with kids—When Hippo Was Hairy and other tales of Africa, told by Nick Greaves, illustrated by Rod Clement (great alliterative title—kids love it) ISBN in hardcover 0349112614. Each story includes a section with facts about the animal in the story-range, behavior, etc. and the illustrations are wonderful. I learned a lot myself by reading it. He has several other books too-another being When Lion Could Fly. They were in most of the KNP camp shops in soft cover.

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Re: Animal Behaviour

Unread postby fevertree » Mon Oct 13, 2008 8:13 am

Beat about the bush: Birds is available from the end of this month. I have ordered my copy through Netbooks in Cape Town
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Re: Animal Behaviour

Unread postby Meandering Mouse » Mon Oct 13, 2008 8:56 am

Thanks for that, Fevertree :D
I have the "Beat about the Bush, Mammals" and it is a thoroughly enjoyable read.
I know so little about birds, I think that I will really appreciate it.
The bird doesn't sing because it has answers, it sings because it has a song.


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