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Penduline-Tit: Cape

Identify and index birds in Southern Africa

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Nannie
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Penduline-Tit: Cape

Unread postby Nannie » Fri Apr 07, 2006 12:01 pm

Saw this nest 9.6km out on the 4x4 route to Bitterpan,sat for half hour but the CPTit would not show we could see it moveing inside the nest.Maybe someone has a photo of one to go with the nest. Image

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restio
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Unread postby restio » Tue Sep 04, 2007 9:50 pm

There's a fascinating article in the latest Economist about the parenting strategies of penduline tits. Here's an excerpt:

Tit for tat
Aug 9th 2007
From The Economist print edition


Abandoning offspring in search of new sexual conquests works—at least, for tits

THE rules of sexual mores, for people at least, tend to have the male of the species seeking multiple mates with whom to father as many children as possible, while the female is burdened with raising the brood. In some animals, though, the roles are reversed. In others child care is divided equally. Now a team of ornithologists has discovered a species of bird in which both males and females abandon their offspring, a strategy that, perversely, increases the number of chicks they have overall.

The researchers ... studied the behaviour of a small bird called the European penduline tit or Remiz pendulinus. These birds are noted for the elaborate covered nests—which hang like bags from the branches of trees—that the males build to attract females. Investment in establishing a family is thus shared between the males, who provide the accommodation, and females, who supply the eggs.

After eggs have been laid, it is usual for either the male or the female penduline tit to leave their partner to raise the chicks. Between 50% and 70% of the time, it is the female who nurtures and provides for the brood but the male assumes this role in between 5% and 20% of nests. Curiously, though, in between 30% and 40% of cases both parents desert the clutch. Dr Szentirmai and his colleagues decided to discover exactly what was going on....

They found that, over the course of the breeding season, deserting the nest once eggs had been laid boosted the number of descendants produced by the bird that fled. Whether male or female, the more often a bird deserted its clutches, the more mates it had and the more eggs were laid. Indeed, both males and females can mate and lay eggs with up to seven different partners in one season. Moreover the birds frequently varied their attitudes to child care between clutches, overall nurturing twice as many as they abandoned, so most of the eggs did hatch live chicks. Abandoning a clutch in search of new sexual conquests is thus a penduline tit's way of maximising reproductive success.

The researchers reckon that the penduline tit is the only known bird species in which both males and females use the same strategy to produce more chicks. For them, fleeing the nest boosts the brood.


The birds studied were actually European Penduline Tits - I wonder if our Cape Penduline Tits use a similar approach?
Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former. - Albert Einstein (1879-1955)

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francoisd
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Re: Penduline-Tit: Cape

Unread postby francoisd » Mon Feb 11, 2008 2:01 pm

Nannie wrote:Maybe someone has a photo of one to go with the nest.

The best I could do. Photographed last week at a picnic site next to a gravel road in the Tankwa Karoo. Another difficult little bird to photograph as they do not stay still for long.


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ice
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Re: Identification Help - General Birds

Unread postby ice » Sun May 03, 2009 11:44 pm

what's the name of that bird which bilds this nest with one fake entrance that leads nowhere, so as to misdirecht predators likes snakes

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thanks

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Re: Identification Help - General Birds

Unread postby anitagibbs » Mon May 04, 2009 12:35 am

ice wrote:what's the name of that bird which bilds this nest with one fake entrance that leads nowhere, so as to misdirecht predators likes snakes

thanks

I think it's a Penduline Tit, ice.
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Re: Identification Help - General Birds

Unread postby Rusty Justy » Mon May 04, 2009 4:31 pm

anitagibbs wrote:Penduline Tit
:thumbs_up:
:dance: STIFFNECKS MEMBER :dance:

FGASA LEVEL 1

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ice
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Re: Identification Help - General Birds

Unread postby ice » Mon May 04, 2009 4:51 pm

thanks to both of you

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arks
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Re: Identification Help - LBJs

Unread postby arks » Thu Jul 15, 2010 4:57 am

Not exactly an LBJ, but I'm wondering what sort of bird might have made this nest, perhaps a weaver of some sort? I've just never seen one that seems to be encased in mud :hmz: Seen in KTP in March 2010.

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francoisd
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Re: Identification Help - LBJs

Unread postby francoisd » Thu Jul 15, 2010 9:33 am

Cape Penduline Tit builds a similar type nest but let's see what the nest experts say
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Lizet Grobbelaar
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Re: Identification Help - LBJs

Unread postby Lizet Grobbelaar » Thu Jul 15, 2010 1:42 pm

I agree, Cape penduline Tit :thumbs_up: They have been recorded in the Kgalagadi. My father in law saw one building a nest a few years ago on the dune road between Tweeriveren and the Auob-riverbed.

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arks
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Re: Identification Help - LBJs

Unread postby arks » Thu Jul 15, 2010 2:28 pm

Thanks Francois and Lizet! I wish I'd also seen the bird :( And this nest was along the dune road between TR and the Auob, where I saw quite a few interesting bird and nests, including my first rufousearred warbler, :dance: but not the tit. Guess I'll just have to return :whistle:
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arks
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Re: Identification Help - LBJs

Unread postby arks » Thu Mar 28, 2013 1:23 am

I really haven't a clue about this bird, which I saw at WCNP on 3 January 2013. Is it possibly a Cape penduline tit? (My other guess would be yellowbellied eremomela, but the green/olive, rather than grey, back makes me think it's more likely the tit?)
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Johan van Rensburg
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Re: Identification Help - LBJs

Unread postby Johan van Rensburg » Thu Mar 28, 2013 4:06 pm

This bird is a Cape penduline-tit.
671 Latest lifer: Black coucal

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arks
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Re: Identification Help - LBJs

Unread postby arks » Thu Mar 28, 2013 4:18 pm

Thanks SO much, Johan! That's my very first Cape penduline tit :dance:
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TrevorC
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Re: Penduline-Tit: Cape

Unread postby TrevorC » Tue Jan 07, 2014 1:33 pm

My first lifer for 2014 - seen at Roodeplaat dam north of Pretoria :D

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Cape Penduline-Tit by trevor.charters, on Flickr
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