Skip to content

SANParks.org Forums

View unanswered posts | View active topics






Post new topic Reply to topic  Page 10 of 33
 [ 481 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 ... 33  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2012 10:11 am 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2011 8:58 am
Posts: 3928
Location: Far South in South Africa.
Nice TR and all photos :clap:
:mrgreen: Birds, Monkey and aaaaaaaaaal Baboons :mrgreen:

_________________
"Lose yourself in Nature and find Peace!" (Ralph Waldo Emerson)
UNITE AGAINST POACHING...What we protect,
do not let poachers take it away!

Extinction is forever and survival is up to---every last one of us!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2012 11:37 am 
Offline
Forum Assistant
Forum Assistant
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2007 6:39 am
Posts: 9058
Location: Pretoria SA
FAC Member (2012)
Oh how I loved your Baboon story Charbel! Such a large troop can keep one busy for quite a while, especially with the ever present babies of different ages! :dance: :dance:

Beautiful close-ups of the Blacksmith Lapwing, as well as the stunning picture of the African Pied Wagtail!! :clap: :clap:

Stunning pictures of the Burchell's Coucal! And the Natal Francolin! :D

_________________
"Happiness, I have discovered, is nearly always a rebound from hard work." - David Grayson


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2012 12:19 pm 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 30, 2009 9:21 am
Posts: 4853
Location: SA
FAC Member (2013)
Great trip report Charbel :clap: :clap: :clap: :thumbs_up:

_________________
An animal's eyes have the power to speak a great language - Martin Buber


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2012 2:13 pm 
Offline
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2005 4:43 pm
Posts: 4145
Location: The planning is on again.....
Love your baboon troop and your birdies, Charbel :thumbs_up:

Obviously they do like it to play in the mud :dance:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2012 3:52 am 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 27, 2010 8:22 pm
Posts: 825
Location: Brazil
Dear Meandering mouse, Philip, Hilda, Grantmissy and Pumbaa,

Nothing like writing a TR and getting feedback! As we miss SA Parks, this is really something to do. Thanks for all the feedback, friends! I loved to put together the baboon story and I am definitely getting better at converting the pictures...

Soon I'll get back to the TR. Busy week here with some invited people from other countries...

Cheers
Charbel

1 June 2013 - Twee Rivieren
2 June 2013 - Kieliekrankie
3-4 June 2013 - Kalahari Tented Camp
5 June 2013 - Twee Rivieren
6-8 June 2013 - Nossob
9 June 2013 - Gharagab
10 June 2013 - Grootkolk
11 June 2013 - Nossob
12 June 2013 - Twee Rivieren


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2012 11:16 am 
Offline
Forum Assistant
Forum Assistant
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2007 6:39 am
Posts: 9058
Location: Pretoria SA
FAC Member (2012)
No problem Charbel, we'll just have to wait! First things first, and work always comes first. :thumbs_up:

Looking forward to the next episode. :popcorn:

_________________
"Happiness, I have discovered, is nearly always a rebound from hard work." - David Grayson


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2012 12:56 pm 
Offline
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2012 11:46 am
Posts: 1967
Location: Pretoria North
Hi Charbel, just cought up again!

Lovely baboon report with the photos.

I just love your Burchell’s Coucal, they are nice big birds and we are so lucky to have some visiting out garden and they have a very special call. I just don't like them eating the chicks of the other birds and sometimes I cant help chasing them away!

Enjoy your visitors!

_________________
Stop the MADNESS or Imagine RhiNOs!
Our natural heritage is being stolen from us one by one!
Make your voice heard and please support a Rhino Project!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2012 3:27 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 27, 2010 8:22 pm
Posts: 825
Location: Brazil
Hi Super Mongoose,

Nice to have Coucals visiting the garden! But I do understand why you chase them away...

Soon to come back, Hilda... Today is a holiday in Brazil, proclamation of the republic, maybe if I catch uo with delayed work, I may make the next posting today...

Cheers
Charbel
1 June 2013 - Twee Rivieren
2 June 2013 - Kieliekrankie
3-4 June 2013 - Kalahari Tented Camp
5 June 2013 - Twee Rivieren
6-8 June 2013 - Nossob
9 June 2013 - Gharagab
10 June 2013 - Grootkolk
11 June 2013 - Nossob
12 June 2013 - Twee Rivieren


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2012 11:48 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 27, 2010 8:22 pm
Posts: 825
Location: Brazil
Finally getting back to the TR. Sorry, friends, the two last weeks were incredibly busy. Interesting how we miss the TR when staying for long without working on it.

Now, during another travel, I managed to finish the next posting. So, friends, directly from Stockholm, where I am on the verge of travelling to Karlstad, countryside Sweden, for two conferences, a new entry to the TR!

I continue with our travel from Skukuza to Tamboti...

In the short connection between the Lower Sabie Road and the Skukuza-Tshokwane Road (H1-2), we saw only a Nile Crocodile from the bridge over the Sabie river. Here is a view of the animal floating as a log in the Sabie river.

Image

Then we entered the Skukuza-Tshokwane Road, where great sightings were indeed waiting for us: the usual Impala group was the beginning, and then a male Impala together with a female Waterbuck. Then, 1 Red-Billed Hornbill (Tockus erythrorhynchus) followed by the major highlight of this portion of the trip: 2 Klipspringers (Oreotragus oreotragus) in a very scenic view. Going on: 1 Lesser Spotted Eagle (Aquila pomarina), 1 White-Headed Vulture (Trigonoceps occipitalis), 2 male Southern-Masked Weavers (Ploceus velatus). In Kruger Memorial Tablets, we saw 1 Woodland Kingfisher (Halcyon senegalensis) and a female Southern-Masked Weaver. Another group of Impalas followed by 1 Lesser Black-Winged Plover (Senegal Lapwing) (Vanellus lugubris) and 1 Crowned Lapwing (Plover) (Vanellus coronatus). We reached Leeupan, where we saw a tree with Hamerkop nests and 2 Egyptian Geese (Alopochen aegyptiaca). Before reaching Tshokwane, then, yet another group of Impalas with a lot of cubs.

The waterbuck and the impala formed a great couple particularly when facing us. It is a curious to see then together as an interspecies couple. Obviously they were not, but it was fun anyway.

Image

Image

The Red-Billed Hornbill was nicely perched on a tree.

Image

This bird does not face threats of extinction until now, being classified by IUCN as Least Concern with stable populations. It is a widespread and common bird, but this does not decrease the pleasure of finding them, at least not for a birder. It occurs from south-eastern Angola and Zambia to southern Africa, being common in open, wooded savanna with sparse ground cover. Its feeding is composed mostly by small insects like beetles, ants, termites and flies, but it also eats larger arthropods, small vertebrates, small seeds and fruit. Their chicks are demanding, with 2-7 eggs laid and incubated solely by the female, for 23-25 days, and the chicks remaining in the nest for 39-50 days. And when they leave the nest, they still remain near the nest for a few more days before joining their parents in foraging.

They sing nicely and repetitively: http://www.xeno-canto.org/browse.php?sp ... rorhynchus

The Klipspringers were in a nice scenario, over rocks, a male and a female, staring at the landscape from a high vantage point.

Image

Image

Image

Klipspringers are dwarf antelopes, with distinctive coat, with coarse, hollow, spiny hair. The hair has a function in regulating the temperature of the antelope, since it insulates them against extreme cold and heat, and reflects the heat from their surroundings during the hotter times of the day. The females are slightly larger than the males and hornless.

This small antelope’s name comes from "rock jumper" in Afrikaans/Dutch, which is quite adequate to its habits, since this antelope is extremely agile at moving across rocky outcrops and steep rocky slopes. Another local name is mvundla (from the Xhosa umvundla, meaning "rabbit"). Well, not so adequate, even though they kinda of look like a rabbit.

They have a large but patchy distribution. That’s because they are only found in rocky habitats, where they can find better protection from predators. They are found from the Cape of Good Hope (in mountain fynbos) through the rest of Southern Africa, where it is found in rocky koppies in woodland and savanna, north to East Africa and into the highly mountainous highlands of Ethiopia. They are active in the early morning and the late afternoon, and throughout the day on cool days.

Among its predators, we find humans, besides leopards, caracals and eagles. They form breeding pairs, which mate for life and will spend most of their lives in close proximity to each other. Just like the pair we saw. When one klipspringer is eating, the other will keep aware of any predators. In this case, none of them were eating, but it was clear that the male was keeping an eye open on the landscape below. Sometimes they are found in small family groups, but in KNP all the ones we saw were breeding pairs. Rams are territorial, marking the territories using communal dung piles and secretions from the well-developed preorbital gland in front of the eye. They are predominantly browser, but sometimes also graze on grass.

They are not threatened by extinction: Least Concern in the IUCN Red List, with stable populations. However, their survival depends on protection within conservation areas.

The pictures are not great, but here it is the White-Headed Vulture we saw in Skukuza-Tshokwane Road. It was perched over a tree and, from time to time, very interested in what was going on below the tree. But for the time we were there, no action took place.

Image

Image

Unfortunately, this nice vulture, with its beautiful coloured face, is under increasing risk of extinction. They are classified as Vulnerable by IUCN, showing decreasing population.

This species occurs in isolated patches around the Red Sea and across sub-Saharan Africa. In southern Africa it is uncommon in north-west-Zimbabwe, Botswana, northern Namibia, Mozambique and eastern South Africa. Thus, we were actually lucky to see this animal. It generally prefers semi-arid woodland, such as Mopane, miombo (Brachystegia) and mixed woodland.

It not only feed on carrion, but rather this vulture is an adaptable carnivore, also catching its own prey and stealing food from other birds, a phenomenon known as kleptoparasitism. When scavenging, it is often the first at the carcass and is dominant over most other vultures, excluding the larger Lappet-faced vulture. However, it generally stays away from the frenzy at the carcass, instead stealing from other scavengers and feeding on the food they drop.

In South Africa, Swaziland and Lesotho, its population is estimated to be just 80-120 breeding pairs. Yes, we were indeed lucky in seeing this animal.

We saw three Southern-Masked Weavers in the Skukuza-Tshokwane Road. Two were males, one of them found working on the nests between an impressive arrays of spines. In Kruger Memorial Tablets, we saw then a female bathing in the water deposited in the ground, which was a nice scene to see.

Image

Image

Image

We can hear them singing here, with a nice variety of songs: http://www.xeno-canto.org/browse.php?sp ... us+velatus

This species occurs across southern Africa even in arid areas, extending into Angola, Zambia and Malawi. It is generally found in semi-arid scrub, open savanna, woodland edges, riverine thicket, farmland with scattered trees, alien tree plantations and gardens.

Brood parasites such as the Diderick Cuckoo (Chrysococcyx caprius) take advantage of this species. As it is the case with all weavers, their nests are a show in themselves, so delicately constructed and constantly repaired. We can see that the male above was really interested in protecting the nests among all those spines in the tree!

This bird mainly eats seeds, fruit, insects and nectar. Most of its foraging is done in small flocks, gleaning prey from leaves and branches, taking seeds from the ground and grass stems.

As I love weavers since I was a child, I am always glad to know when a weaver is not threatened (Least Concern with stable populations in IUCN), as it is the case of this one, which in fact adapted well to the introduction of man-made habitats, using Eucalyptus and other alien trees in areas which were previously barren.

We were in Kruger Memorial Tablets resting for a while and eating something when we saw two things at a distance tree that looked like butterflies. More attention showed, however, that there were two Woodland Kingfishers beautifully showing their wings. For some time, they would be perched.

Image

But they would open their wings from time to time, in some kind of display.

Image

Finally here is a more detailed view of this tiny wonder of nature.

Image

Fortunately, these birds are not threatened, classified as Least Concern in the IUCN Red List with stable populations.

There are several recordings of their calls here: http://www.xeno-canto.org/browse.php?sp ... kingfisher

Here you can also find their calls: http://www.biodiversityexplorer.org/bir ... lensis.htm

These are adaptable birds, feeding mainly on insects but also on small vertebrates, such as fish, snakes and even other birds! They occupy a wide range of woodland and savanna habitats, provided there are streams, rivers or lakes. Common in Sub-Saharan Africa, this is an intra-African migrant, arriving in southern Africa around September-December, breeding then leaving for Central Africa around March-April.

As far as I remember this was the only time we saw a Lesser Black-Winged Plover, also called Senegal Lapwing

Image

This bird is classified as Least Concern in the IUCN Red List, with regard to its extinction. However, its populational trend is unknown, what makes me feel more insecure about the information. As it is rare in South Africa, it is susceptible to regional extinction there.

The movements of this bird in southern Africa are not well understood. It is mainly resident in Zimbabwe but is a regular non-breeding summer visitor to the Kruger National Park, what explains why we saw it there when we visited. It is also a breeding winter visitor to northern KwaZulu-Natal. It departs from KwaZulu-Natal in the period from December-January, probably heading to Mozambique and the South African lowveld.

It mainly eats termites with a supplement of other terrestrial invertebrates. Most of the foraging is done visually, plucking from the ground by day and night. A curiosity is that it often forages along with other birds, such as Crowned, Blacksmith and African wattled lapwings, as well as Kittlitz's and Caspian plovers. Indeed, we saw it close to a Crowned Lapwing.

It was great to find this other plover in the Skukuza-Tshokwane Road.

Image

According to the IUCN Red List, this bird is also of Least Concern regarding its extinction, but is in fact increasing its populations, as a consequence of habitat modification by humans.

It mainly eats termites (corresponding to approximately 80-90% of its diet), using the typical foraging technique of plovers, running, stopping and then searching for prey on the ground. It often forages in groups,, moving in a regularly spaced line.

In Xenocanto, we find some nice recordings of its calls: http://www.xeno-canto.org/browse.php?sp ... ed+lapwing

Here is one of the reasons why we never go tired of taking pictures of Impalas. When we were about to reach Tshokwane, we found this group with a great quantity of cubs, and, as cubs usually do, a lot of cosy behaviors were shown by them.

First, a general view of the group

Image

Look how these tiny ones touch each other… We can really think of tenderness between siblings, when looking to something like this.

Image

Here they are cozily together, showing why Impalas have the most beautiful butt in the animal kingdom and deserve, thus, the best month in the butt calendar. For newcomers, if you go back some postings, you will discover what is the idea behind the butt calendar… :o)

Image

And, finally, see how this cub looked at us! It is impossible to be tired of Impalas, no matter how abundant they are.

Image

Another great thing about the Skukuza-Tshokwane Road is how scenic it is. For instance, Eileen Orpen Rocks are very beautiful. This kind of geological formation is found very often in South Kruger.

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2012 12:24 am 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2011 8:58 am
Posts: 3928
Location: Far South in South Africa.
:yaya: Charbel :yaya:

:mrgreen: You came back with a "BANG" :mrgreen:

:sup: Magic and Stunning photos, as well as your TR. Love the "Kingfishers" :great:

_________________
"Lose yourself in Nature and find Peace!" (Ralph Waldo Emerson)
UNITE AGAINST POACHING...What we protect,
do not let poachers take it away!

Extinction is forever and survival is up to---every last one of us!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2012 5:31 am 
Offline
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2005 8:47 pm
Posts: 12724
Location: meandering between senility and menopause
FAC Member (2013)
Charbel, ditto with Philip. :thumbs_up:

I love all you antelope shots, such beautiful creatures. Pity the lions also think so.

:popcorn:

_________________
The bird doesn't sing because it has answers, it sings because it has a song.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2012 6:06 am 
Online
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2011 1:09 pm
Posts: 3602
Location: Pretoria, SA
FAC Member (2013)
Award: Newcomer of the Year (2012)
Stunning pic's all around :clap: :clap: :clap: .
Love the waterbuck and impi together :dance: .
Thanks for sharing :thumbs_up:

_________________
Always be humble and understanding


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2012 7:25 am 
Offline
Forum Assistant
Forum Assistant
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2007 6:39 am
Posts: 9058
Location: Pretoria SA
FAC Member (2012)
Fantastic picture where the Impie and the Waterbuck are facing the camera Charbel! And those cute Klipspringertjies!! :clap: :clap:

Awesome birdie pictures too, and I am glad the Woodland Kingfishers are back! :dance: :dance:

Love all your Impie pictures! Those little ones are so cute! :D

_________________
"Happiness, I have discovered, is nearly always a rebound from hard work." - David Grayson


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2012 5:54 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 27, 2010 8:22 pm
Posts: 825
Location: Brazil
Hi Hilda, Barryels, Philip and Meanderig Mouse,
Nice to know you're still on board despite my delay.... Lions like Impalas but just part of nature, I am not sure I would be astonished or pitiful if I saw them getting onto one of the cute ones... Maybe a more complex mixed up feeling...

Did the Woodland Kinghfishers disappear from KNP before? Just guessing about Hilda's comment that it is nice they're back.

I really like when the animals face us, never seen that happened so often as in KNP... It adds to the fascination!

All the best
Charbel


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 7:12 am 
Offline
Forum Assistant
Forum Assistant
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2007 6:39 am
Posts: 9058
Location: Pretoria SA
FAC Member (2012)
Hi Charbel, the Woodland Kingfishers are only present from October to April, occasionally later, in mixed bushveld and riverine or swamp-fringing woodland. (Nocturnal migrant.) :thumbs_up:

_________________
"Happiness, I have discovered, is nearly always a rebound from hard work." - David Grayson


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 481 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 ... 33  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Goronta, impyim, Rooster and 4 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group

Webcams Highlights

Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Submitted by kcilliers at 10:39:59 Submitted by avidspotter at 13:48:36 Submitted by rolle at 13:56:46 Submitted by kcilliers at 10:19:11