Skip to content

SANParks.org Forums

View unanswered posts | View active topics






Post new topic Reply to topic  Page 16 of 19
 [ 279 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 3:21 pm 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 29, 2005 12:52 pm
Posts: 1738
Location: My business...
Dotty wrote:
and will have babbelaas? where does that come from?


It's a loan word form the Zulu "ibhabhalazi", used to describe the effects of a night's drinking..


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 3:22 pm 
Offline
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2010 9:51 am
Posts: 4776
Location: Johannesburg SA
FAC Member (2013)
babelas (zulu origin)
pronounced as written: ba-ba-las

Meaning:
A hangover.

"I have a babalas today after last getting vrot last night on amarula!"

PS -
you have not lived until you have experienced a babalas at babalala 8)

_________________
Kruger 2014!!!

16-23 August - Lower Sabi!!!!


Last edited by cheetah2111 on Sun Nov 04, 2012 3:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 3:26 pm 
Offline
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2010 9:51 am
Posts: 4776
Location: Johannesburg SA
FAC Member (2013)
:lol: :lol: :lol:

Jou Gat man!
pronounced - Yoh (as in hip hop slang) Gat (with the German rough GGGG sound) man (same as english)
Yoh-Gat-man

Meaning:
Guinea Pig wrote:
Literally translated it means "Your behind man!"

Used to tell the other person you ABSOLUTELY do not agree with what they just said, usually when you think he/she is lying to you.


:thumbs_up:

_________________
Kruger 2014!!!

16-23 August - Lower Sabi!!!!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 3:37 pm 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2006 9:09 pm
Posts: 19661
Location: another national park.. in England
:thumbs_up: :clap:

_________________
KUDU's mean Well done and Thank you


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 9:02 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Nov 14, 2009 12:07 pm
Posts: 536
Some of my favourites are:

I threw him with a brick which hit his one leg and hurt his one eye. Instead of I threw a brick at him which hit one of his legs and injured one of his eyes.
Another: I only eat porridge. So this person does nothing else. It should be I eat only porridge. This misuse of the word only does not apply only to Saffies but to many other countries as well.

OWN when do we proceed to "B"?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 12:06 am 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2006 9:09 pm
Posts: 19661
Location: another national park.. in England
kiekie ?



pops wrote:
.OWN when do we proceed to "B"?

_________________
KUDU's mean Well done and Thank you


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 10:55 am 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Wed May 05, 2010 1:15 pm
Posts: 1183
Location: Joburg *sigh*
FAC Member (2013)
Kiekie
pronounced : kicky

Meaning:
A photo.

"Jislaaik, but that's a lekker kiekie of that giraffe!"

_________________
The simple rule to follow with all animals is one of respect.

Is the bush calling loudly? Read about the Bush Camps presented by the HR's

Travel Tales - Jaxi's and Porridge's 4th adventure


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 11:09 am 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2006 9:09 pm
Posts: 19661
Location: another national park.. in England
Thanks Porridge

_________________
KUDU's mean Well done and Thank you


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 11:26 am 
Offline
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Aug 11, 2007 7:29 pm
Posts: 7084
Location: Parklands Cape Town
FAC Member (2012)
How about bioscope????
or Bredie?

_________________
I am sitting here thinking how nice it is that wrinkles don't hurt


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 1:12 pm 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Wed May 05, 2010 1:15 pm
Posts: 1183
Location: Joburg *sigh*
FAC Member (2013)
Bioscope

This is actually the name of the very early film projector from the early 20th century, and South Africans adopted the word in order to describe a cinema. It's usage persists amongst the older SAers.

Bredie

a traditional Southern African dish consisting of a stew of meat (typically mutton) and vegetables. (Possibly from the Portuguese bredo)

_________________
The simple rule to follow with all animals is one of respect.

Is the bush calling loudly? Read about the Bush Camps presented by the HR's

Travel Tales - Jaxi's and Porridge's 4th adventure


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 1:15 pm 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 29, 2005 12:52 pm
Posts: 1738
Location: My business...
Porridge wrote:

Bredie

a traditional Southern African dish consisting of a stew of meat (typically mutton) and vegetables. (Possible from the Portuguese bredo



You'll often hear Afrikaans people calling it MOERBYKOS. :lol:

Literally means "throw together everything within reach food".


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 2:03 pm 
Offline
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Mon May 19, 2008 4:30 pm
Posts: 2636
Location: Helderberg
One of the most delightful Afrikaans expressions I have encountered is "vloermoer" (kid throwing a tantrum) :D

_________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 5:17 pm 
Offline
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Aug 11, 2007 7:29 pm
Posts: 7084
Location: Parklands Cape Town
FAC Member (2012)
Saffies call them Traffic circles the Uk bunch call them round abouts ..
Gogga ....... any type of Kreepy crawly
gogo A granny in Zulu.
Oom and Tannie Afrikaans children seldom call older people Mr Mrs or miss so and so . its oom( uncle) and Tannie ( aunty)

_________________
I am sitting here thinking how nice it is that wrinkles don't hurt


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 5:23 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:31 pm
Posts: 9845
Location: Ballito, KZN North Coast, South Africa
I also love the term a Mik & Druk Camera!

Generally its a very basic type of camera, no fancy dials or anything like that.

I guess you could call it a Point and shoot!

_________________
Where ever you go, go with all your Heart.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 5:27 pm 
Offline
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
User avatar
Award: Funniest/Best Forumite Name (2013)
Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2005 12:38 pm
Posts: 9702
Location: In the shadow of Table Mountain
FAC Member (2012)
Afrikaans has some delightful words or expressions that English cannot do justice to.

Take gatvol for instance, meaning more than thoroughly fed up.

I guttral g, (as per usual) - like cat, foll, as in follow.

Then snotklap. What you would like to do to the kid doing a vloermoer (as per billyf previously) when his parents think it is cute. Pronounced as you see it.

_________________
Whatever (according to BB): "You are correct but I don't want to admit it".


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 279 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group

Webcams Highlights

Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Submitted by Trudie at 21:56:53 Submitted by Trudie at 21:55:36 Submitted by Stampajane at 18:03:01 Submitted by stu at 13:56:07