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 Post subject: Re: Birding school for ducklings.
Unread postPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 12:38 pm 
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Virtual Ranger
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Location: Bloemfontein
Challenge #3/June 2012

A great big thank you to all the 'mites that participated! :clap: :clap: :clap:
We had 11 participants for this weeks challenge of which 2 scored 10/10, 3 scored 9/10, 5 scored 8/10 and 1 scored 7/10. Of these 3 retried and 2 scored 10/10 and 1 scored 8/10. Very good results and you can all be very proud of yourselves.

Herewith the answers and explanations:

1. Fiscal Flycatcher Male
A more slenderly built bird than the similar looking Common Fiscal. Other features distinguishing between the two include a small Flycatcher type bill, white strip in the wing not on the shoulder. A shorter tail with white edges to the upper part of the outer tail, whereas th Common Fiscal has a longer tail with a thin white edge extending the entire length of the outer tail feather.
Image

2. Black-shouldered Kite
Diagnostic is the two black "shoulder" patches clearly visible.
Image

3. Orange River White-eye
Clearly a White-eye with the white feathers surrounding the eyes. Then the apricot/peachy coloured flanks is diagnostic.
Image

4. Southern Masked-Weaver Non-breeding Male.
This bird proved the most challenging this week. Taking the range of all the Weavers into account you would only have been left with two possibilities being Southern Masked- and Cape Weaver. First of all the bill on this bird is not heavy enough to be that of Cape Weaver. Secondly the head is more rounded and does not slope into a gentle forehead from the bill as with the Cape Weaver. Then thirdly the eye of the male Cape Weaver is always a diagnostic white, this bird clearly shows a bit more colour. During the non-breeding season the male Southern Masked-Weaver still has a red eye but it's just a bit less intense.
Image

5. Double-banded Courser
The double breastband is diagnostic.
Image

6. Pririt Batis Male
Range would have been sufficient to ID this species.
Image

7. Bokmakierie
The only Bush-Shrike species found in the area so range would have once again been sufficient to ID the particular bird. The bright yellow tips to the tail was also diagnostic.
Image

8. Blacksmith Lapwing
Easy enough the only Lapwing in the area with black, white and grey markings. Also black legs.
Image

9. African Red-eyed Bulbul
Very clearly a Bulbul with the brownish colour combined with the black cap and bright yellow vent. Both area and the diagnostic red eyering would have lead to the ID.
Image

10. White-browed Sparrow-Weaver Female
Clear enough was the broad white eyebrow which makes it unmistakable this along with the white underparts and rump is diagnostic. The reason this is a female is because of the horn coloured not black bill.
Image

Dabchick is in charge of the next challenge! Enjoy :thumbs_up:

Also read more about the:

1. Fiscal Flycatcher Here
2. Black-shouldered Kite Here
3. Orange River White-eye Here
4. Southern Masked-Weaver Here
5. Double-banded Courser Here
6. Pririt Batis Here
7. Bokmakierie Here
8. Blacksmith Lapwing Here
9. African Red-eyed Bulbul Here
10. White-browed Sparrow-Weaver Here


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 Post subject: Re: Birding school for ducklings.
Unread postPosted: Mon Jul 02, 2012 10:14 am 
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Junior Virtual Ranger
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Hope im not going to spoil somebody fun with the following pics but i need help with the whydahs.

here is three pics.

1.) dabchicks pic.

Image

2.) Pic from site i use to id the bird.
Image

3.) Pic from same website

Image


According to site bird in pic no 2 is the Broad-tailed paradise-whydah and bird in pic no 3 is the Long-tailed paradise-whydah.

Look at the chess color.

HELP PLEASE is the site wrong or what

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Keep them YR's flying

Planning next trip

NO HOTELS PLEASE !!!!!!!


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 Post subject: Re: Birding school for ducklings.
Unread postPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2012 7:39 am 
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Virtual Ranger
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Hi Ducklings!
Answers#4/June 2012

Not many problems with this challenge, as expected :D , 4 'mites got 8/8 and two 7/8. The only problem was with the long-tailed paradise-whydah. As mentioned in one of the posts above, the long-tailed paradise whydah has got a long, pointed tail, while the broad-tailed paradise whydah has got a shorter, broader tail - especially near the tip of the tail.

louis dreyer had some questions about the colouring of the chest. My book says the colouration of the breeding males of the two species are almost identical. Furthermore, my pic is very over-exposed - I do not have the best camera equipment, nor am I very experienced in taking photographs - at the moment it is more about "record shots" for me than getting the pic absolutely perfect... so if the colouration is maybe not reflected 100% true in the pic I chose. I also took the pic near Crocodile Bridge, and this distribution clinches the identification, as broad-tailed do not occur there...

1. Giant/Verreaux's Eagle-Owl
Image

2. Spurwinged goose (geese) :lol:
Image

3. Village weaver
Image

4. Black stork
Image

5. Long-tailed paradise whydah
Image

6. Water thickknee
Image

7.Spotted thickknee
Image

8.Little bee-eater
Image
[/quote]

Also read more about the:

1. Giant/Verreaux's Eagle-Owl Here
2. Spurwinged goose Here
3. Village weaver Here
4. Black stork Here
5. Long-tailed paradise whydah Here
6. Water thickknee Here
7. Spotted thickknee Here
8. Little bee-eater Here


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 Post subject: Re: Birding school for ducklings.
Unread postPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2012 7:40 pm 
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Virtual Ranger
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Location: Bloemfontein
Challenge #1/July 2012

Thanks to all the ducklings who participated, due to the fact that I'm posting this reply from Kruger and still using my mobile browser I'm only going to give you the right answers and then you need to go and assess yourself where you went wrong.

So herewith the answers:

1. Crimson-breasted Shrike
Image

2. European Bee-eater
Image

3. Green-backed Heron
Image

4. Northern Black Korhaan
Image

5. Male, Pied Kingfisher Here you will be marked according to whether you can answer the sex of the bird correctly.
Image

6. Black-headed Oriole
Image

7. Whiskered Tern
Image

8. Jacobin Cuckoo
Image

9. Cape Glossy Starling
Image

10. Red-winged Starling
Image

Also read more about the:

1. Crimson-breasted Shrike Here
2. European Bee-eater Here
3. Green-backed Heron Here
4. Northern Black Korhaan Here
5. Male, Pied Kingfisher Here
6. Black-headed Oriole Here
7. Whiskered Tern Here
8. Jacobin Cuckoo Here
9. Cape Glossy Starling Here
10. Red-winged Starling Here


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 Post subject: Re: Birding school for ducklings.
Unread postPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2012 7:31 am 
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Virtual Ranger
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Location: Pretoria
This was a nice an easy one, and the participants have done very well! But for the next few challenges I'm going to stick with my philosophy that the Ducklings challenge is about introducing newbie birders to the diversity of birds out there, rather than posting difficult-to-ID birds...(for which the Bird ID Challenge is there :D )

Ten 'mites participated, 8 scored 8/8, 1 scored 7/8 (but it should have been 8/8 as this mite was thinking "little egret" but wrote down "cattle egret" :wink: ), and one scored 6/8 (this mite also had the egret wrong and I think left something important (i.e. "redbilled") out of the name of the hornbill. Typo :hmz: )..

Here are the answers (since you've all done so well, I'm not going to elaborate on the distinguishing characters - I'm sure you've all investigated it well to come up with the answers :

Dabchick wrote:
Answers #2/July 2012


1. (Southern) red-billed hornbill
Image

2.African green pigeon
Image

3a & b Little egret (note the yellow feet vs. black legs and bill) and Hamerkop
Image

4. Goliath heron
Image

5. (Just the eagle, not the starling) Martial eagle
Image

6. (Photo taken near Rustenburg...) Groundscraper thrush
Image

7. Emerald-spotted wood-dove
Image



Also read more about the:

1. red-billed hornbill Here
2.African green pigeon Here
3.1 Little egret Here
3.2 Hammerkop Here
4. Goliath heron Here
5. Martial eagle Here
6. Groundscraper thrush Here
7. Emerald-spotted wood-dove Here


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 Post subject: Re: Birding school for ducklings.
Unread postPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2012 12:51 pm 
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Virtual Ranger
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Location: Bloemfontein
Challenge #3/July 2012

Good morning Ducklings I hope you all had a wonderful "birding trip" down to Southern Kruger with me? :thumbs_up: We had a total of 7 participants this week of which 1 scored 10/10, 1 scored 9/10, 2 scored 8/10 (With one of the participants trying again and got 10/10) and 3 scored 7/10.

Herewith the answers and explanations:

1. Pearl-spotted Owlet
Spotting on the head combined with brown streaking on the chest and belly.
Image

2. Southern Black Flycatcher
Bill a bit slighter than that of Fork-tailed Drongo, however in this picture one can clearly see that this bird has a brown not dark red iris as in Drongos. Also the tail is not as deeply forked as in the Fork-tailed Drongo.
Image

3. White-browed Robin-Chat
Very pronounced broad white eyebrow combined with all-over orange underparts is diagnostic.
Image

4. White-crowned Lapwing
When at rest the white stripe separating the brown back and black wing is diagnostic. Other features includes the grey head with a broad white crown stripe, white underparts and the large yellow wattles at the base of the yellow, black tipped bill.
Image

5. Tawny Eagle
The only "true" Eagle (due to the legs being feathered to the tallons) which is brown and has this large build found in Southern Africa during winter would be the Tawny. However saying this there might sometimes be an exception to the rule. For instance we saw a single Steppe Eagle Juvenile just up the road from this particular Tawny on the very same day. But chances of this happening is very slim. Other reasons this can't be a Steppe Eagle for instance is the colouration of the bird, Steppe Eagles are much darker in colour and the extend of the gape would stretch to just past the eye with the Steppe Eagles. The generally large chunky appearance with the very loose feathering around the legs and massive bill should sort out confusion with other brown Eagles in the region (especially in winter).
Image

6. Speckled Mousebird
The black upper mandible and pale lower is diagnostic. Range would also have been sufficient.
Image

7. Chestnut-backed Sparrowlark
The mostly black bird with the large white ear patch and chestnut visible on the wing would have been diagnostic. Range would also have bee sufficient.
Image

8. Chinspot Batis
From this angle it would have been nearly impossible to ID this Batis if it was not for the range.
Image

9. Sombre Greenbul
The all over olive-grey appearance (slightly lighter below) of this bird along with the range would bring you to two possibilities, Sombre and Yellow-bellied Greenbul. The angle was a bit misleading but one can make out that the bird in question has a pale eye (diagnostic) whereas the Yellow-bellied Greenbul would have a reddish eye.
Image

10. Scarlet-chested Sunbird
Mostly black bird with a metallic green upper-throat and crown. But diagnostic is the large scarlet breast and lower-throat.
Image

Dabchick will be hosting the next challenge. :thumbs_up:

Also read more about the:

1. Pearl-spotted Owlet Here
2. Southern Black Flycatcher Here
3. White-browed Robin-Chat Here
4. White-crowned Lapwing Here
5. Tawny Eagle Here
6. Speckled Mousebird Here
7. Chestnut-backed Sparrowlark Not on the "Bird Index" yet
8. Chinspot Batis Here
9. Sombre Greenbul Here
10. Scarlet-chested Sunbird Here


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 Post subject: Re: Birding school for ducklings.
Unread postPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2012 7:37 am 
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Virtual Ranger
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Dabchick wrote:

6 participants; 5 scoring 8/8, 1 scoring 7/8

Answers to Challenge #4/July 2012

1. Yellow-bellied greenbul. Once you figure out that this bird is of the bulbul/greenbul/brownbul group, the rest is easy. Dark, not light, eye, yellow underparts.
Image

2. African harrier hawk Bare, yellow facial skin, bare yellow legs
Image

3. Red-capped robin-chat robin-chat with orange face and blue-grey back and wings
Image

4. Golden-breasted bunting golden-yellow breast, along with white stripes (on black) above and below the eye.
Image

5. Magpie shrike black and white plumage with very long, wispy tail
Image

6. Blue waxbills unmistakable, blue face, breast and underparts with brownish crown, nape, wings & back
Image

7. Yellow-billed duck Yellow bill with black patch on the upper mandible.
Image

8. White-crested helmet-shrike Grey crown, white collar, black back and wings with white flashes, yellow eye and around eye
Image



Pantera leo will run the next two challenges... :thumbs_up:

Also read about the:

1. Yellow-bellied greenbul. Here
2. African harrier hawk Here
3. Red-capped robin-chat Here
4. Golden-breasted bunting Here
5. Magpie shrike Here
6. Blue waxbills Here
7. Yellow-billed duck Here
8. White-crested helmet-shrike Here


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 Post subject: Re: Birding school for ducklings.
Unread postPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2012 3:44 pm 
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Virtual Ranger
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Challenge #3/July 2012

Good afternoon Ducklings, with this cold weather the challenge and answers are going quite slow but here we go. We had 6 participants for this weeks challenge of which 2 scored 10/10, 2 scored 9/10, 1 scored 8/10 and 1 got 6/10.

Herewith the answers and explanations:

1. Emerald-spotted Wood-Dove
Green spots on wings reflect in direct sun, also an all dark bill.
Image

2. Southern White-faced scops Owl
Overall grey appearance with black streaks and a white facial disk. Normally the eyes present orange but the angle and the early morning sun might be playing tricks with the camera. Some did opt for Spotted Eagle-Owl but the size in relation to the leaves and fruit of the Bushwillow is off.
Image

3. Yellow-billed Stork
Large, mostly white bird with long yellow bill.
Image

4. Bearded Scrub-Robin
Rufous markings on the breast and flanks combined with bald black and white head markings and a "broken" wing-panel.
Image

5. White-headed Vulture
Perhaps a bit deceiving seeing as this bird is still an Immature so the head has brown not white feathers/down, but the head is not bare and red as would be seen in Lappet-faced Vulture.
Image

6. Red-billed Oxpecker
All red bill with a conspicuous yellow eye-ring.
Image

7. Lilac-breasted Roller
Lilac throat and breast with blue belly.
Image

8. Lesser Masked-Weaver
Face mask almost non-existing due to the fact that the bird is in non-breeding plumage. To identify to species level one would take into account the dark horn-coloured bill combined with the blueish-grey legs. The birds also have a pale eye.
Image

9. African Barred Owlet
Barring on the head, throat and upper-breast with tear-drop shaped blotches on the belly.
Image

10. Yellow-breasted Apalis
Combination of the yellow breast and red eye is diagnostic.
Image

Also read more about the:

1. Emerald-spotted Wood-Dove Here
2. Southern White-faced Scops Owl Here
3. Yellow-billed Stork Here
4. Bearded Scrub-Robin Here
5. White-headed Vulture Here
6. Red-billed Oxpecker Here
7. Lilac-breasted Roller Here
8. Lesser Masked-Weaver Here
9. African Barred Owlet Here
10. Yellow-breasted Apalis Here


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 Post subject: Re: Birding school for ducklings.
Unread postPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2012 9:46 am 
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Virtual Ranger
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Location: Bloemfontein
Challenge #1 August 2012

Good morning Ducklings, well this weeks challenge went really well and as Louis said I think you're "growing up" fast. With 3 getting 11/11, 3 getting 10/11, 2 getting 9/11, and 1 got 8/11. :clap:

Herewith the answers and explanations, if you require some more info let me know:

1. Black-winged Stilt: Black and white wader with very long red legs.
Image

2. Southern Pochard: Brown duck with white crescent extending behind the eye.
Image

3. Fulvous Whistling Duck: Golden brown plumage with a dark back and white plumes on the flanks.
Image

4. Malachite Kingfisher: Small Kingfisher with warm orange-brown underparts, all red bill and turquoise coloured crown extending to the eye.
Image

5. Cape Teal: Very pale coloured duck with pink bill.
Image

6. Orange-breasted Bush-Shrike: Distinct yellow eyebrow, black lores and orange breast.
Image

7. Black-bellied Bustard: Combination of range and having no chevron markings on back would eliminate all other possibilities.
Image

8. African Wood-Owl: Clear yellow bill and cere is diagnostic.
Image

9. Spotted Eagle-Owl: Range would have been sufficient to exclude other similar sized brown eyes. Also the barring on the belly region is much finer and narrower than in Cape Eagle-Owl.
Image

10.1 Hamerkop: The very distinct head-shape caused by the low crest makes it unmistakable.
10.2 Woolly-necked Stork: Black body and woolly looking white neck is diagnostic.
Image

Dabchick will run the next challenge again. Just a note on the quiz of Tuesday the 21 August, I will be posting it a day late if you don't mind because I'm heading down to the Cape for the weekend so then I'll be able to post some new birds for you! :thumbs_up:

Also read more about the:

1. Black-winged Stilt Here
2. Southern Pochard Here
3. Fulvous Whistling Duck Here
4. Malachite Kingfisher Here
5. Cape Teal Here
6. Orange-breasted Bush-Shrike Here
7. Black-bellied Bustard Here
8. African Wood-Owl Here
9. Spotted Eagle-Owl Here
10.1 Hamerkop Here
10.2 Woolly-necked Stork Here


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 Post subject: Re: Birding school for ducklings.
Unread postPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2012 7:19 am 
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Virtual Ranger
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Posts: 623
Location: Pretoria
Dabchick wrote:
Answers to Challenge #2/August 2012

Well done ducklings!

11 participants
3 score 8/8
6 scored 7/8, and
2 scored 6/8


The first two pics taken in Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, the third in Augrabies NP, and the rest in the KNP...

1. Southern pale chanting goshawk. Very similar to Dark chanting goshawk, but distribution mentioned (KTP), eliminates the DCG
Image

2.Marico flycatcher. A couple of 'mites thought chat flycatcher or familiar chat, but light-coloured, whitish underparts (visible here is the chin and throat area) is diagnostic and distinguishes it from other flycatchers as well as the familiar chat.
Image

3. African red-eyed bulbul - no problems here. The red ring around the eye is diagnostic.
Image

4. Black-headed oriole. No problems.
Image

5. African hoopoe. Again no problems - there are no other bird in the region that looks like this.
Image
6. Hooded vulture. Juvenile / sub-adult. The bare, pinkish face and downward curving bill makes it a vulture. The relative slender bill is diagnostic for hooded vulture. Compare the bill size with the next pic of a lappet face vulture - which has a very strong, massive bill.
Image

7. (Cold - it was about 6 degrees outside :lol: ) Lappet faced vulture. Bare, pink face along with massive bill are diagnostic. Size also counts when you see it in real life. The lappet face is probably about twice the height of a hooded vulture (when you see them sitting around a kill). Some 'mites misidentified either 6 or 7 as a juvenile white-headed vulture. However, a white-headed vulture will have a orange-red bill with blue cere - the only vulture in the region with that colour combination.
Image

8. European bee-eater. Few problems here. One 'mite though it could possibly be a swallow-tailed bee-eater, but the locality given above (KNP), eliminates that possibility.
Image


Also read more about the:

1. Southern pale chanting goshawk. Here
2. Marico flycatcher. Here
3. African red-eyed bulbul Here
4. Black-headed oriole. Here
5. African hoopoe. Here
6. Hooded vulture. Juvenile / sub-adult. Here
7. Lappet faced vulture. Here
8. European bee-eater. Here


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 Post subject: Re: Birding school for ducklings.
Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2012 6:36 pm 
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Virtual Ranger
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Location: Bloemfontein
Challenge #3 August 2012

Good evening Ducklings sorry for the delay. The past weeks scores includes one mite scoring 10/16, one scoring 11/16, two scoring 12/16, three scoring 13/16, one scoring 14/16, one scoring 15/16 and one scoring 16/16.

Herewith the answers and explanations:

1. Large-billed Lark: Rather heavily built bird with a thick bill and diagnostic yellow base to the bill.
Image

2. Cape Canary: The grey hind crown and nape combined with the mustard yellow face and chin and lack of bold facial colours are distinctive.
Image

3. Common Starling: Glossy black plumage with white flecking and yellow bill.
Image

4. Cape Spurfowl: Large size with all dark plumage and no bare facial skin. Legs and feet dull reddish-orange.
Image

5. Amethyst Sunbird: Female, range combined with dull white eyebrow and dark markings on the chest and upper-belly.
Image

6. Karoo Prinia: Obvious long and cocked tail with bold streaking on the underparts combined with range.
Image

7. Cape Weaver: Only two possibilities for the region, combined with the large bill.
Image

8. Knysna Turaco: Only Turaco in the region, other than that the short crest is diagnostic.
Image

9. Southern Boubou: Black above with white wing-bar, white bellow with buff flanks and belly. The most obvious would be the range.
Image

10. Greater Double-collared Sunbird: Large long and less decurved bill along with a broader red band on the chest.
Image

11. Olive Thrush: Only Thrush in the region, but the orange flanks combined with the conspicuous markings on the throat is diagnostic.
Image

12. Yellow-throated Woodland-Warbler: Small dumpy bird resembling a White-eye in size and shape. Mostly yellow underparts combined with a rusty brown crown and stripe through the eye.
Image

13. Cape Bulbul: I reckon everyone can identify a Bulbul and with the conspicuous white eye-ring it is unmistakeable.
Image

14. Kelp Gull: Perhaps one of the more difficult species but the thick-set appearance and rather large yellow bill should have been enough to identify.
Image

15. Cape Bunting: The obvious black and white streaking on the head combined with the grey back and red wings are diagnostic.
Image

16. Cape Rock-Thrush: Male, the overall rufous and blue-grey plumage should point towards a male of the Rock-Thrush species. The rufous upper breast combined with the brown back is diagnostic.
Image

Unfortunately due to my new job I won't be able to continue but it was a great pleasure taking you all under my wing. Hopefully you all learned a little something which will help aid you in the veld while out birding this new season.

I also want to urge you to continue participating on the ducklings thread but also to show your support on the other Bird ID Challenge.

Thank you all once again!!! :clap: :clap: :clap:

Also read more about the:

1. Large-billed Lark Here
2. Cape Canary Here
3. Common Starling Here
4. Cape Spurfowl Here
5. Amethyst Sunbird Here
6. Karoo Prinia Here
7. Cape Weaver Here
8. Knysna Turaco Here
9. Southern Boubou Here
10. Greater Double-collared Sunbird Here
11. Olive Thrush Here
12. Yellow-throated Woodland-Warbler Not on the "Bird Index" yet
13. Cape Bulbul Here
14. Kelp Gull Here
15. Cape Bunting Here
16. Cape Rock-Thrush Here


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 Post subject: Re: Birding school for ducklings.
Unread postPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2012 6:04 pm 
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Legendary Virtual Ranger
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OK, firstly, a confession, there were not meant to be 11 birds :redface: :redface: :redface:

The first bird did not pose much of a challenge. The bill gave it away as a Yellow billed duck.

1. Image

Number 2 stumped a couple of people. The bill looked rather large, but the forhead is very indicative of a Thick billed Weaver.

2. Image

Number 3 also caused a bit of confusion, it is a Black headed heron

3. Image

The Pin tailed Wydah did not pose problems. This was taken close to my bird feeder and he was an unbelievably cheeky little thing. He would often chase other birds away.

4. Image

The Pied Crow didn't cause problems. Another cheey bird and would often steal my dog's food.

5. Image

The Egyptian Geese have shattered the peace again. No problems for the mites :thumbs_up:

6. Image

Cape Wagtail, these little critters did cause some confusion. As ever, the Capies can't seem to leave G'teng alone :whistle:

7. Image

OK, mistake number 1... the picture posted was meant to be of 2 African Olive Pigeons. I marked both the red eyed dove and turle dove correct.

8. Image

I marked both Fiscal Flycatcher and Fiscal Shrike correct. Again, posted the incorrect picture. I thought that it was not serious until I saw that the bill/beak was not as clear as I had thought. I did not think that it was fair to leave the most defining element out.

I am reminded of why I am not a school teacher.

9. Image

Red eyed dove posed no problems

10. Image

So thanks all for participating. I think that I learnt the most.

Also read more about the:

1. Yellow billed duck Here
2. Thick billed Weaver Here
3. Black headed heron Here
4. Pin tailed Whydah Here
5. Pied Crow Here
6. Egyptian Geese Here
7. Cape Wagtail Here
8.1 African Olive Pigeon Here
8.2 Cape turtle dove Here
9. Common Fiscal Here
10. Red eyed dove Here

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 Post subject: Re: Birding school for ducklings.
Unread postPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2012 7:08 am 
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Legendary Virtual Ranger
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Thank you all for your participation :thumbs_up:

Seems that there was no prblem experienced.

Brown hooded Kingfisher

1.

Image

Lesser masked Weaver

2.

Image

Red Crested Korhaan

3.

Image

Three banded plover

4.

Image

Kori Bustard

5.

Image

Dark Chanting Goshawk

6.

Image

Wooly Necked Stork

7.

Image

Water Thick Knee

8.

Image

Magpie Shrike

9.

Image

Lovely, beautiful Golden Breasted Bunting.

10.

Image

Also read more about the:

1. Brown hooded Kingfisher Here
2. Lesser masked Weaver Here
3. Red Crested Korhaan Here
4. Three banded plover Here
5. Kori Bustard Here
6. Dark Chanting Goshawk Here
7. Woolly Necked Stork Here
8. Water Thick Knee Here
9. Magpie Shrike Here
10. Golden Breasted Bunting Here

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The bird doesn't sing because it has answers, it sings because it has a song.


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 Post subject: Re: Birding school for ducklings.
Unread postPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2012 6:46 am 
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Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
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Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2005 8:47 pm
Posts: 12201
Location: meandering between senility and menopause
FAC Member (2013)
Firstly, thank you all who participated.

Mocking cliff chat

1.

Image

Egyptian Goose

2.

Image

Secretary bird

3.

Image

White-backed Vultures

This caused a challenge for some, as the one vulture looked decidedly different. It was also difficult to see certain features. The Cape Vulture looks similat, but is much larger. The White-backed Vulture is the most commonly found vulture in Kruger and this also strenthens the white backed identity.

4.

White Storks

Image

5.

White storks

Image

6.

Tawny Eagles

This is a parent and juvenile sharing a recent kill.

Image

7.

Meve's Starling.

Image

8.

Brown Snake Eagle

Image

9.

Black Bellied Bustard

Image

10.

The beauties are Maribou Stork, Yellow billed Srork and possibly Great Egret. Not really enough to give a definitive answer on the egret. It was so blended in though that it was difficult to see it as another species.

Image

I am handing over to whoever wants.

This has been great fun.

Also read more about the:

1. Mocking cliff chat Here
2. Egyptian Goose Here
3. Secretary bird Here
4. White-backed Vulture Here
5. White stork Here
6. Tawny Eagles Here
7. Meve's Starling Here
8. Brown Snake Eagle Here
9. Black Bellied Bustard Here
10.1 Maribou Stork Here
10.2 Yellow billed Srork Here

_________________
The bird doesn't sing because it has answers, it sings because it has a song.


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 Post subject: Re: Birding school for ducklings.
Unread postPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2012 8:00 pm 
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Senior Virtual Ranger
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Joined: Sun Oct 26, 2008 5:10 pm
Posts: 2519
Hello Ducklings, here are the answers to the challenge (??) I set, which didn't seem to be much of a challenge for those who responded. :D Well done to everyone who got all of the answers right.

1 African sacred ibis
Image

2 Cape robin chat
Image

3 Grey go away birds
Image

4 Cape sparrows
Image

5 Speckled mousebird
Image

6 Egyptian goslings
Image

7 Southern masked weavers
Image

8 Juvenile Bateleur
Image

9 Black crake
Image

10 Violet backed starling
Image

Thank you all for taking part.

Also read more about the:

1 African sacred ibis Here
2 Cape robin chat Here
3 Grey go-away-birds Here
4 Cape sparrows Here
5 Speckled mousebird Here
6 Egyptian goslings Here
7 Southern masked weavers Here
8 Juvenile Bateleur Here
9 Black crake Here
10 Violet backed starling Here


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