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Woodpecker, Bearded

Identify and index birds in Southern Africa

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wildtuinman
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Woodpeckers: Bearded woodpecker

Unread postby wildtuinman » Mon Jun 12, 2006 8:23 am

As you can see by now... Biyamithi is an excellent camp for birding photography.

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Last edited by wildtuinman on Mon Jun 12, 2006 12:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Unread postby j-ms » Mon Jun 12, 2006 11:06 am

One of the ways to pickup Beared vs Cardinal if you can't see them that well is that the Bearded's pecking sounds like a jackhammer compared the Cardinals's.

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Unread postby Elsa » Mon Jun 12, 2006 12:08 pm

When sitting quietly one of the first give aways to a woodpeckers presence is the very distinctive tapping that is heard.
Interesting that the two species have different tapping noises, must listen more carefully in future. :D
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Jumbo

Unread postby Jumbo » Mon Jul 31, 2006 4:41 pm

Elsa wrote:When sitting quietly one of the first give aways to a woodpeckers presence is the very distinctive tapping that is heard.


When the tapping sound is at a regular rhythm, they are communicating…when it is irregular they are looking for food.
I also heard that the shape of the hole to their nests differ…is that true?
Apparently they also make their nests on the bottom side of a branch to prevent rain from getting in.

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Unread postby Kwando » Mon Aug 21, 2006 1:16 pm

j-ms wrote:One of the ways to pickup Beared vs Cardinal if you can't see them that well is that the Bearded's pecking sounds like a jackhammer compared the Cardinals's.


I saw a cardinal yesterday... Is it true in saying that the bearded woody is a lot bigger in size than the cardinal... I was fortunate enough to get a perfect sighting of the little fellow for a few minutes, while he hopped around banging in different various branches (Obviosly - looking for food?)
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Woodpecker, Bearded

Unread postby Mgoddard » Fri May 09, 2008 10:54 am

All I can say is that I had an awesome time looking for birds in the Park....please can someone ID these for me...

This one was seen on the road from Orpen to Satara...he did not want to sit still so pics not very good...I think it might be some kind of woodpecker :redface: but cant find it in my books...

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Unread postby Niall » Fri May 09, 2008 11:13 am

Hi MG

Woodpecker: He is a She - female Bearded

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Unread postby MarkWildDog » Thu Jul 17, 2008 2:12 pm

Mgoddard,

After having a look at your photos. I came up with two possibilities, female cardinal woodpecker and female bearded woodpecker. However, i am positive your sighting is a female bearded woodpecker because it doesnt hav the distinguished brown forehead that a cardinal woodpecker has. Also their habitats differ quite a bit. Bearded woodpeckers tend to stay around tall or dead trees. . Where cardinal woodpeckers have a vast variety of habitats. . The number of woodpecker species in kruger is very limited so it is definitely a female bearded woodpecker as you suggested. But who knows it could even be a juvenile little spotted woodpecker. But they only occurs deeper into mozambique.

Hope this helps.

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Unread postby Johan van Rensburg » Thu Jul 17, 2008 2:19 pm

Consider this a definite "YES"... it certainly IS a Bearded Woodpecker female :lol:

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Unread postby wildtuinman » Fri Jul 18, 2008 6:40 am

As for MGoddard's Woodpecker. I agree with female Bearded Woodpecker. It is the only Woodpecker with an all black head (crown all the way extending to the nape).
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Re: Woodpeckers: Bearded woodpecker

Unread postby DinkyBird » Sun Apr 22, 2012 7:12 pm

Kruger, Nov 2010:

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Bearded Woodpecker by dinkybird, on Flickr
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Re: Woodpeckers: Bearded woodpecker

Unread postby Jan van Wyk » Tue Jun 19, 2012 8:24 pm

Great sighting and images

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Re: Woodpeckers: Bearded woodpecker

Unread postby Super Mongoose » Tue Oct 01, 2013 8:02 pm

This Bearded Woodpecker (a lifer for me and Skillie) entertained us for hours at Klein Kariba near the waterfall, September 8. He was flying back and forth to his nest across the water with insects he found in the tree. We could not locate his nest, but he was back at the tree very quickly to find more bugs. On the last photo you can see his tongue going into one of the many little holes he made.

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