Skip to content

SANParks.org Forums

View unanswered posts | View active topics






Post new topic Reply to topic  Page 1 of 6
 [ 79 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Share something interesting
Unread postPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2012 7:23 am 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 30, 2009 9:21 am
Posts: 5803
Location: SA
FAC Member (2013)
I have read the under mentioned in a Guide to the Addo-Elephant National Park dated 1982, written by Hans Grobler and Anthony Hall-Martin, which was addressed to the Secretary of the then National Parks Board:

Dear Sir

It is with pleasure to report that I have managed to chase a herd of elephant into the Park last night. I do not know how long the elephants will stay there but if they escape they will have no rest whether it is day or night. There is still a few who remain separate from the herd that I must look for – they are cows with calves.

S. H Trollope
Addo
9 October 1931

I roughly translated the above from Afrikaans to English as the guide is in Afrikaans. The same with the below:

From Dreyers Tourist Notes dated 1984:

The photo (in the above book/guide) is “Ou Haaktand” one of the magnificent 7 elephants of Kruger. He was recently found dead near Shingwedzi and he died from bullet wounds caused by poachers. His tusks, both longer than 3 m is the fourth longest elephant tusks ever found in Kruger.

It would be nice :D if someone can share another “did you know?” with us regarding any aspect of any of our great South African National Parks :thumbs_up: .

_________________
Everything in moderation, including moderation – Oscar Wilde


Last edited by Grantmissy on Wed Feb 06, 2013 7:21 am, edited 2 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Did you know?
Unread postPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2012 7:29 am 
Offline
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2005 8:47 pm
Posts: 13613
Location: meandering between senility and menopause
FAC Member (2013)
Grantmissy :D lovely thread :thumbs_up:

I love bits and peices about all kinds of history.

Just in terms of Addo, Harpoor, who was probably the father of many ellies now in Addo, was rather a bad tempered old bull. Not surprising given the fact that hunting had decimated nearly all of his kind. He had the rather bad habit of escaping at regular intervals. Harpoor dam carries his name and his memory.

_________________
The bird doesn't sing because it has answers, it sings because it has a song.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Did you know?
Unread postPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2012 2:57 pm 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 30, 2009 9:21 am
Posts: 5803
Location: SA
FAC Member (2013)
Yes MM, it appears that Hapoor was quite an ill-tempered bull who did not take any nonsense from anyone! Some people even say that an elephant never forgets (the hunting that you mentioned?) and perhaps that is why he was such a “grumpy old bull” who did not like to be "told what to do" :D . Nice to know that he will not be forgotten and that he will always live on - the Hapoor Dam that you have mentioned :thumbs_up:

_________________
Everything in moderation, including moderation – Oscar Wilde


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Did you know?
Unread postPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2012 3:10 pm 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 30, 2007 1:16 pm
Posts: 1861
Location: Fairest Cape
And saw his son, Harpoor Junior, was killed in a fight last week :(

http://www.sanparks.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=40&t=60218


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Did you know?
Unread postPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2012 3:22 pm 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 10, 2007 3:44 pm
Posts: 2903
Location: Welkom
FAC Member (2012)
Speaking about Addo, did you know the during the late 1960's it was advisable to call the Port Elizabeth publicity Association first before you intend to visit Addo. The elephants stayed in the dense bushes during the day and only came out at night to receive their rations of oranges and other stuff. Spotlights lit up the area where they were fed. No internal roads existed(Source, 1969 issue of the AA road Atlas)

Also from the Atlas "Where hotels are far from each other, it is advisable to take along some camping equipment as well as tinned food for 2 days"

_________________
Give thanks for unknown blessings already on its way---African saying
Member nr 8512
Cheetah supporterPURIST and proud thereof


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Did you know?
Unread postPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2012 7:28 am 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 30, 2009 9:21 am
Posts: 5803
Location: SA
FAC Member (2013)
Very interesting Rooies :thumbs_up:

From The Companion Guide to South Africa written in 1978 by Geoffrey Jenkins and Eve Palmer:

“Orpen is the little camp on the western boundary, where tourists still find paraffin lamps and open braais. Near the camp two Pretoria visitors, Mr and Mrs Wainwright, were attacked by an elephant some years ago. Elephant attacks are very rare, there have been only five incidents in which they have seriously damaged cars in the Park - and in this case the car was unwittingly driven between a cow elephant and her calf on the other side of the road. The elephant knelt on the car – a Peugeot – rocking it backwards and forwards, ripping up the bonnet and ramming it against the windscreen, finally spearing the radiator with a tusk. Mr Wainwright, somehow through the horror dredging from his memory an old warning, ‘if an elephant charges your car bang on the roof’, leaned out and banged. The elephant stopped and calmly walked away. Mrs Wainwright partially blacked out during the incident - and so can bear to tell the story; but her husband, who had been keenly alert all the time, cannot. When she told it to us, he excused himself and went away, if he had listened, he said, he would not have slept that night”

_________________
Everything in moderation, including moderation – Oscar Wilde


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Did you know?
Unread postPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2012 11:33 am 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2012 2:21 pm
Posts: 127
Location: Cape Town
Grantmissy wrote:
Meandering Mouse wrote:
Possibly the Addo sign is to discourage ellies from getting too familiar with tourists.


Might also be historically related to the 1960’s practice what Rooies told us about and the love for oranges were passed on from one generation to the other?


If I remember from my trip to Addo some years back, the "no citrus" ruling came about because the elephants can smell the citrus and many of the older ones can remember that smell as meaning food. And then they try to obtain it, which, you can imagine, is something not too many tourists would appreciate.

Quote:
Rooies wrote:
The elephants stayed in the dense bushes during the day and only came out at night to receive their rations of oranges and other stuff.


Those Addo elephants under the iron rule and examples set by old Harpoor sound like a clever bunch of elephants to me :D

By the way what is the correct name Harpoor or Hapoor?


It's Hapoor, pronounced as hap-oor, from the piece of ear missing from a rifle shot early in his life (which allegedly accounts for his bad attitude towards people - understandably if you ask me).


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Did you know?
Unread postPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2012 12:24 pm 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 30, 2009 9:21 am
Posts: 5803
Location: SA
FAC Member (2013)
Thanks Orange :D :thumbs_up:

From the same 1978 book that I mentioned above I read the following regarding the Tsitsikamma National Park:

“This coastal park, quite rightly, receives a great deal of publicity. It is a young Park still, not two decades old, and was the first coastal national park in Africa.”

I assume that they went for a walk on one of the trails after which they wrote this:

“On the path back we skirted a cave, the home by the sea that the Strandlopers - those early Stone Age men of the Cape coast – had used once upon a time. This must then have been as hospitable a shore as now, for all along it have been found the signs of ancient man, not ape-man but later people who left in the caves of this southern coast middens which tell us today something of the story of their lives. In places they left their bones as well the remains of skeletons ceremoniously buried, beads of ostrich eggshell, red ochre, and sometimes painted grave stones”.

_________________
Everything in moderation, including moderation – Oscar Wilde


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Did you know?
Unread postPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2012 7:33 am 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 30, 2009 9:21 am
Posts: 5803
Location: SA
FAC Member (2013)
The Golden Gate Highlands National Park is a place of great natural beauty and many visitors who are artistic inclined have found inspiration there. I gave seen amongst others great paintings in the art galleries in nearby Clarens and many good photographs that people have taken. I think that might be the reason why some examples of rock art can be found in the Park as contained in the book ‘The Rock Art of the Golden Gate and Clarens districts” written by Bert Woodhouse and printed in 1996. According to the book examples of rock art can be found at places such as Ribbokspruit, Buffalospruit and the Oorbietjie Basin. What I found interesting was the “Vintage Car” site as described in the book. The site is very close to where the road bends and traffic on the road is visible from the site. The engravings are of mostly vintage cars which were probably made by shepherds. It just shows that the surroundings even inspired the shepherd to put their artistic talents to use!

_________________
Everything in moderation, including moderation – Oscar Wilde


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Did you know?
Unread postPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2012 12:20 pm 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 10, 2007 3:44 pm
Posts: 2903
Location: Welkom
FAC Member (2012)
I have read in one of my books about Kruger (can't remember which one) about an elephant that raided a citrus farm outside Kruger. The rangers chased him back to Kruger and followed him for a while to make sure that he was as far away from the farm as possible. A few km inside Kruger, the elephant decided that it was time to make a dung heap and in this dung was a whole orange. The author of the book came to the conclusion that in the elephant's haste to gobble up as many oranges as possible, he might have missed to chow the orange.

The ranger then picked up the orange from the dung, wiped it clean and ate it. I assume that the inside of the orange was not affected by the dung. :D

_________________
Give thanks for unknown blessings already on its way---African saying
Member nr 8512
Cheetah supporterPURIST and proud thereof


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Did you know?
Unread postPosted: Thu Mar 15, 2012 8:09 am 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 30, 2009 9:21 am
Posts: 5803
Location: SA
FAC Member (2013)
Some visitors to Kruger are quite familiar with marula trees. The elephants like to eat the bark of the tree and it is said that marula oil is more than 40 times stable than the very best olive oil. I once tasted beer made from marulas but it is a bit sour :| to my taste. I rather like the following Kruger cocktail - mix 3 tots amarula liqueur, 3 tots orange liqueur and 1 tot brandy well and serve with lots of ice but do not drink more than one of these.

_________________
Everything in moderation, including moderation – Oscar Wilde


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Did you know?
Unread postPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2012 7:23 am 
Offline
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2005 8:47 pm
Posts: 13613
Location: meandering between senility and menopause
FAC Member (2013)
Harry Wolhuter's "Memories of a Game Ranger", must be one of my favourite books.

He talks a lot of the decimation of game and the slow regeneration of Kruger. In this passage he makes a remarkable discovery.

"One early morning, about this time, as I rode down towards the Olifants I saw what I at first took to be two huge rocks away out in the sandy bed of the river. It struck me as strange that I had not previously noticed these rocks, as I had passed that very spot many times; and then, as I watched, one of the rocks moved distinctly, and with a tremendous thrill it dawned on me that of course in reality they were elephants! I obtained a good view of them before they disappeared from view in the bush; I think that these were the first elephants seen in the game reserve."

_________________
The bird doesn't sing because it has answers, it sings because it has a song.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Did you know?
Unread postPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2012 10:30 am 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 30, 2009 9:21 am
Posts: 5803
Location: SA
FAC Member (2013)
Meandering Mouse once told us some time ago just after I have joined the forum about her visit to a grave in Satara of a ranger who passed away and I think she took the remaining family of the person who died along with her. I remember how it made an impression on me and I wanted to ask her a question but the post that she made was locked and one couldn’t ask questions, I think it was under the old compliments and complaints but I remember she said that the grave was very well cared for. I do not remember the name of the ranger but MM said it is was a very long time ago, most probably in the period of the last book mentioned by Ndloti above. The question that I wanted to ask MM was did she see the remains of the house where those people lived as, if I remember well she said that the person who passed away was buried near the house. Did they had a garden and are those signs of domestic live – the house and garden - still visible or not but perhaps only the grave has been kept by the Satara management as a person can understand that it is a nature conservation area?

_________________
Everything in moderation, including moderation – Oscar Wilde


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Did you know?
Unread postPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2012 10:46 am 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2006 1:45 pm
Posts: 4954
Location: southern gauteng
Ranger Lloyd .. MM can relate,he was buried at Satara by his wife about a century ago,the house has long since been demolished.

Once MM has replied I will if necessary quote the passage from African Eden .

_________________
KNP is sacred. I am opposed to the modernisation of Kruger and from the depths of my soul long for the Kruger of yesteryear! 1000+km on foot in KNP incl 56 wild trails.200+ nights in the wildernessndloti-indigenous name for serval.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Did you know?
Unread postPosted: Sat Mar 17, 2012 7:05 am 
Offline
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2005 8:47 pm
Posts: 13613
Location: meandering between senility and menopause
FAC Member (2013)
Ndloti, I would love to hear more, thank you. :thumbs_up: Its a book that I must get.

I also enjoyed Jane Curuther's book on Stevenson. What a great man. We owe him so much debt. He was a man untouched by ego and a superb administrator.

Two years ago I booked a week in Kruger over new year. We were going to stay in Punda, camping. I told my children that friends were allowed. My one daughter, who was still studying at the time mentioned that one of her friends was particularly keen to go, as her great grand father had died of Pneumonia shortly after taking up a post as a ranger in the Satara area.

This was a time when there were no roads. The main mode of transport was horse, donkey or foot. He had not been there for too long when he fell ill. With no antibiotics or suitable medicine, he died rather quickly. A black guide/worker had to travel through veld to Skukuza to let Stevenson Hamilton know of the tradgedy. By the time he arrived at Satara, the young widow and her three young sons had buried their father.

My daughter's friend and my daughter went on their way out of Kruger to visit the grave at Satara. It is in the staff village. The staff at Satara could not have been more helpful. My daughter tells me that the grave had been well looked after. It was gratifying to see such respect.

I asked about the way the family remembered the affair. I believe the wife was some tough cookie. There was little time for sentiment when death was such a close reality.

_________________
The bird doesn't sing because it has answers, it sings because it has a song.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 79 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group

Webcams Highlights

Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Submitted by Trrp-trrrrrrrr at 10:12:02 Submitted by teddy_rsa at 11:19:03 Submitted by frisian at 12:48:15 Submitted by avidspotter at 06:04:56