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Hyaena, Spotted

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Imberbe
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Unread postby Imberbe » Tue Feb 28, 2006 9:53 pm

Spotted Hyena is able to drive lions from a kill. This often leads to serious altercations and sometimes animals (both Hyena and Lion) are seriously injured or even killed. If there are enough Hyena to substantially outnumber the lion pride, they will attack and harass the lions, until they leave!
There is however one factor that mostly prevent them from being able to do this! A big male or coalition seems to be just too intimidating! They are just so much bigger and stronger than any Hyena, that they seem to negate a numerical advantage the Hyena might hold. A lot of instances have been noted where male Lion have intentionally attacked and killed Hyena. :shock:
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Unread postby DuQues » Mon May 01, 2006 5:08 pm

Nature just published an article about pregnant dominant spotted hyena's giving their offspring a heavy dose of testoteron in the second half of the pregnancy to help them up the ranks even before birth.
It seems to work,
Nature wrote:(...) both male and female cubs born to mothers with high concentrations of androgens in late pregnancy exhibit higher rates of aggression and mounting behaviour than cubs born to mothers with lower androgen concentrations. Both behaviours are strongly affected in other mammals by organizational effects of androgens, and both have important effects on fitness in hyaenas. Therefore, our results suggest that rank-related maternal effects of prenatal androgen exposure can adaptively influence offspring phenotype in mammals, as has previously been shown to occur in birds. They also suggest an organizational mechanism for the development of female dominance and aggressiveness in spotted hyaenas, traits that may offset the costs of extreme virilization.
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Stephen
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Biyamiti #3 - Hyaena Regurgitation

Unread postby Stephen » Tue May 09, 2006 12:17 pm

Stephen wrote::D
Well done Wildtuinman. Indeed it is the regurgitation(hair & bone) from a Hyaena (Crocuta crocuta) that had an Impala (Aepyceros melampus) as a meal.
Hyena are very good at using almost all of a carcass as food and that is one of the reasons they are such successful predators.
However to be able to make the most of a meal and get all the protein and fat out of bone it does not deed to waste time and energy on pieces of prey that it can not get any use off.
Hair, horns and hoofs – with basic matter of keratin, which is rather indigestible – are regurgitated.
Only what can get used is actually fully processed by the digestive system.
Just another way that one of the most successful predators adapted to make live easier for itself.

In cases of lion and leopard a good majority of hair continue through the digestive system.
Last edited by Stephen on Thu May 11, 2006 11:12 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Biyamiti #6 - Fresh Hyaena Dung

Unread postby Stephen » Mon May 15, 2006 4:50 pm

:D Greetings from Biyamiti

The dung is olive green in colour.
Please help, what was wrong with this animal? :wink:

Yes to my knowledge nothing was wrong with this animal.
It was indeed dung from hyaena and as you correctly said dung from predators (especially hyaena) tends to be olive green when fresh, turning white when drying out.
The high calcium content (from eating bones) having that result.

The dung is very typical shaped, which is a dead giveaway for hyaena, there are some fine hair in (remember the regurgitation of the furball by hyaena) but not as much as would be expected from lion dung.
Lion dung would also tend to be more sausage like and generally much darker (almost black) because of the blood (with less bone) intake at a kill.

Indeed baboon dung would show the plant material (seeds mostly) clearly visible in the dung.
The baboon would also make smaller droppings with a slightly pointed defecation.

Leopard dung would be much along the lines of that of lion – just much smaller with less hair as they prefer plucking their prey before eating.

Just to give you an idea of the size of this dung heap – it was measuring about 25 cm across.
Last edited by Stephen on Tue May 16, 2006 11:26 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Meandering Mouse
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Hyenas

Unread postby Meandering Mouse » Sun May 28, 2006 12:47 pm

Can you believe it, nothing on hyenas.
I love the critters.
To me they are the street kids of the park.. they beg, scavange, they are chased off by all other more established predators.. they look like hell...
The ultimate expression of God's sense of humour... but also the sadness of the outcast.
they even produce strange turds... yet they are so important.
Anyone want to join me in a tribute to hyenas?
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Unread postby Bushmad » Fri Jun 02, 2006 1:16 pm

Hi Bradley and Welcome!

Wild Dogs are very nomadic and only stay in an area when denning (raising pups). Wild Dogs, as far as I know do not use the same den every year nor do they live in one permanently. We would have to be very lucky if they had a den close to a road, then there is an excellent chance of seeing them. Your question is therefore a very good one, so if anyone knows of current denning sights for Wild Dogs that would be helpful but Wild Dogs tend to move on once the pups are old enough and sometimes change dens often while denning to protect the pups.

Hyena are much more settled in their territories and occupy the same dens for years, they often use the culverts beneath the roads as dens so are often seen. One den that we OFTEN see them at is on the main tar road between Satara and Olifants, closer to Olifants and in the vicinity of the S89 junction.

It would be interesting to build up a database of all Hyena dens along roads in the park and to keep current info on where any Wild Dog denning activity is, this is most often far from tourist roads so much luck is needed to find them and they are not permanent so active dens are what we should be looking for.
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madach
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Unread postby madach » Mon Jun 12, 2006 6:15 pm

Here are some locations of dens that were 'active' last May:

Near Balule
S24 04.039 E31 44.118

North of Kumana Dam on the H1-3
S24 36.105 E31 47.404

North of Afsaal (20km) next to tar road
S25 10.548 E31 33.808

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DuQues
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Unread postby DuQues » Thu Sep 07, 2006 3:09 pm

One of the little fellows near Balule on a nightdrive:

Image
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Unread postby Wild about cats » Sun Sep 17, 2006 4:47 pm

Image
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Muhammad
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Unread postby Muhammad » Fri Oct 27, 2006 9:49 pm

S1,S65 junction culvert.
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Unread postby Muhammad » Fri Oct 27, 2006 9:54 pm

Phabeni leader

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Impisi08
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Unread postby Impisi08 » Mon Nov 06, 2006 7:30 pm

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Yesterday the movie "Hyena Queen" was broadcasted on the Dutch National Geographic Channel.

Quote: "Acclaimed wildlife filmmaker, Kim Wolhuter, spent months on the Mala Mala game reserve in South Africa, winning the trust of a hyena clan and gaining an in-depth understanding of their behaviour."

A nice movie although unfortunately some parts were presented in the "MTV way", jumping from image to image. Wolhuter was walking with the hyena's while they were hunting, sitting on the ground next to a kill and filming the clan while they were feeding, petting one the young hyena's (named .... Scratchy) at the den while Mom was there and even lying on his back between the clan. Although I am not so sure he is giving the right message here, it was amazing to see.

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Mafunyane
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Unread postby Mafunyane » Wed Apr 18, 2007 12:21 pm

What are the male and female terms for hyena's??
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Unread postby Mafunyane » Wed Apr 18, 2007 8:13 pm

I think we should then set this right by giving them names..maybe she-males for the females(since they have mock male-genitals) :P :P
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Unread postby BushCall » Thu Apr 19, 2007 6:04 am

Female Spotted Hyena are GENERALLY much larger than the male in a sample of adult Hyena. Looking at the photo briefly I would say the big fat one in front is female and the smaller one is either a sub adult or adult male


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