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 Post subject: Tree: Magic Guarri (Euclea divinorum)
Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2005 11:46 am 
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macho mouse wrote:
Have not had Bush Baptists luck with zippers. I have been raided a number of times when monkeys have managed to unzip the tent.
On my last bush trip I found my toothpaste 3 metres away from my tent, filled with tiny teeth marks. Thank goodness they left my toothbrush intact as we were well away from any shops.


You can always just use the magic gwarrie bush's twig to double up as toothbrush. :lol: :wink:


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Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2005 12:08 pm 
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wildtuinman wrote:
You can always just use the magic gwarrie bush's twig to double up as toothbrush. :lol: :wink:


:lol: you can see who loves nightdrives!! (specially around Satara) thiose guides love the magic gwarrie / Euclea divinorum story!

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Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2005 12:34 pm 
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Jakkalsbessie wrote:
wildtuinman wrote:
You can always just use the magic gwarrie bush's twig to double up as toothbrush. :lol: :wink:


:lol: you can see who loves nightdrives!! (specially around Satara) thiose guides love the magic gwarrie / Euclea divinorum story!


And trails! :lol:


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2005 12:45 pm 
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wildtuinman wrote:
Jakkalsbessie wrote:
wildtuinman wrote:
You can always just use the magic gwarrie bush's twig to double up as toothbrush. :lol: :wink:


:lol: you can see who loves nightdrives!! (specially around Satara) thiose guides love the magic gwarrie / Euclea divinorum story!


And trails! :lol:


Yep sorry forgot to mention the trails as well!
Forgot the most obvious reason why you would know everything about magic gwarrie....
Because there are sooo many on the S100 :twisted:

Ok just kidding... due to this
Fruit is also used in the fermentation of beer :lol: :lol:

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2005 1:27 pm 
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Jakkalsbessie wrote:
Forgot the most obvious reason why you would know everything about magic gwarrie....
Because there are sooo many on the S100 :twisted:


Gaan spring innie Nsemani dam!
Go jump in the Nsemani dam!

Btw, I personally closed the s100 down with a no-entry you will waste your time sign! :twisted:


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Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2005 7:46 pm 
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Here is a bit of info, I love learning about the trees. :)
Magic Guarri Euclea divinorum
This is a deciduous shrub or small tree, found in thorn scrub, on hill sides, along river banks and in woodland.
The bark is light grey in colour and smooth.
The flowers are very small and white to creamy yellow in colour.
The fruit is round in shape and fleshy, becoming purplish black when fully mature. The fruit is edible but not pleasant tasting.
The fruit can be used as a laxative and used as a cleansing agent.
The fruits have also been used to make pink coloured ink. The bark produces a brown dye
Fruit is also used in the fermentation of beer.
The frayed end of a twig can be used as a toothbrush and the ash of a leadwood as toothpaste.
Branches are used to keep away ticks and flies.
The leaves are eaten to enhance appetite
The leaves are used to smoke pork.
The Ovambo tribe hangs small branches in their huts as good luck charms.
They will not cut this tree down, as the wood is believed to have supernatural powers.
I also believe that it is a favourite tree for leopards to use for marking their territory.


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2005 8:23 pm 
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Freda wrote:
The bark produces a brown dye
.....
The frayed end of a twig can be used as a toothbrush and the ash of a leadwood as toothpaste.


In case anyone missed this, make sure you take the bark OFF before brushing your teeth......

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2005 8:35 pm 
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Thank you Loams.
A little detail that I could have missed.
I would still like to buy one of those.

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Thu Aug 18, 2005 6:18 am 
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After picking a twig, you have to chew on the end of it till it becomes spilt up. You then just re-arrange the splits and voila! you have a toothbrush. You can even get toothpaste in the bush. :wink:


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Thu Aug 18, 2005 7:57 am 
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macho mouse wrote:
Thank you Loams.
A little detail that I could have missed.
I would still like to buy one of those.

Maybe try the nusery close to Skukuza the next time you are in the Park. If I'm not mistaken someone on the Forum works for a nusery so maybe they can let you know if there is any other source?

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Thu Aug 18, 2005 12:03 pm 
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Some more info...

Euclea divinorum is widespread from Sudan and Ethiopia to Namibia, Botswana and South Africa.

Although Euclea divinorum is rarely cultivated, it can be propagated by suckers, transplanting seedlings or direct seeding. There are about 30,000 seeds/kg. The seeds are perishable and lose viability within about 2 months. They germinate readily; no pretreatment is necessary. Euclea divinorum has a good coppicing ability and root suckers are common, growing up some distance from the tree.

In East Africa an infusion of the bark is used as a condiment in the preparation of a fatty meat and milk soup.
Roots are chewed as a disinfectant and to colour the lips and mouth red.
Some evidence exists that twigs of Euclea divinorum used as a toothbrush not only clean the teeth but also inhibit growth of teeth-attacking bacteria :lol: because of their high polyphenolic content.

In East Africa the wood is used for tool handles and carving, and as firewood.
In traditional medicine root extracts and dried powdered roots are applied for the treatment of gastro-intestinal disturbances, cancer, ulcers, wounds, arthritis, miscarriage, jaundice, snakebites and gonorrhoea.
The Shangaan people apply ground roots on the skin against leprosy and to relieve headache and toothache.

In south-western Ethiopia Euclea divinorum is used to purify drinking water by adding branches to the gourds or pots and leaving them to soak in the water for several hours.

In western Kenya Euclea divinorum is one of the species used in the treatment of milk to increase its digestibility, palatability and preservation; sometimes treated milk can be stored for over a year without turning bad, which is vital to the household food security.

Occasionally, Euclea divinorum serves as an ornamental and shade tree.
The bark of Euclea divinorum has a high tannin content
*this is very interesting anyone seen kudu's etc eating them?*

Euclea divinorum occurs in grassland with scattered trees and open bushland, often on termite mounds, but also in secondary forest, margins of evergreen forest and on stony slopes, from sea-level up to 2700 m altitude.

It is particularly common on arsenical soils, which are often associated with gold deposits or reefs, and it has been suggested that it may have value as an indicator of the presence of gold :shock: S100 here i come Image

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 Post subject: Magic Guarri (Euclea divinorum)
Unread postPosted: Sun Apr 09, 2006 11:39 am 
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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Fri Apr 14, 2006 3:55 pm 
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Magic Guarri (Euclea divinorum)

Taxonomy
Current name: Euclea divinorum
Authority: Hiern
Family: Ebenaceae

Synonym(s)
Embelia oleifera S. Moore
Euclea huillensis Gurke
Euclea katangensis De Wild.
Euclea keniensis R.E. Fries.
Euclea lanceolata sensu Hiern

Common names
English: Magic gwarra
Luganda: Nsikizi
Swahili: Mdaa
Tswana: Motlhakola
Zulu : Umhlangula
Afrikaans: Towerghwarrie
Setswana: Motlhakola

Its Latin name relates to the fact the its branches are used to divine (i.e. locate) water.

Habitat:
In open woodland, often associated with termite mounds.
Altitude range: 840 - 1500 m
Flowering time: Aug - Jan
Worldwide distribution: From Ethiopia and the Sudan south to South Africa.

Description:
This is a deciduous shrub or small tree, found in thorn scrub, on hill sides, along river banks and in woodland. The bark is light grey in colour and smooth. It grows to heights of up to 6 meters. The leaves are dark blueish-green above and lighter below.
The flowers are very small and white to creamy yellow in colour.
Image
The fruit is round in shape and fleshy, becoming purplish black when fully mature. The fruit is edible but not pleasant tasting.
The plant has remarkable coppicing and root suckering ability and if not checked, tends to weediness, dominating pasture to the detriment of wildlife and pastoralism.

Uses:
The fruit can be used as a laxative and used as a cleansing agent. The fruits have also been used to make pink coloured ink. Fruit is also used in the fermentation of beer.
Roots of this shrub are dug out and pounded or crushed. Boiled powder with palm leaves is used to paint baskets dark brown.
The fibrous bark makes a very good toothbrush, especially since the sap is said to kill most oral bacteria. You can also rub guarri leaves on exposed limbs to repel insects - something that many animals take advantage of.
The root is used in the production of black floor mats. In Ovamboland a purple ink is made by boiling the fruit.

Myths:
The Ovambo tribe hangs small branches in their huts as good luck charms.
They will not cut this tree down, as the wood is believed to have supernatural powers.
Digging up a piece of the root and carrying it home without speaking to anyone is helpful in making creditors forget the debt you owe them.

Medicinal uses:
Against stomach disease bark is dried and ground; 1 pinch of the powder is mixed with 1 glassful of water; also, the whole root can be boiled and the resultant solution taken as a remedy for stomach disease. lt is taken only once, and it acts as a purgative. This medicine may not be taken by children.

This mixture is also given give to a man who sleeps with an adulteress who got pregnant by a man other than her husband. One teacup of water boiled with powdered roots is taken three times a day.
Women who fail to menstruate take one teacup of water boiled with powdered roots is three times a day.

Against constipation, two cups of water boiled with roots are taken twice a day.

In Kenya the root decoction is used as a purgative and the bark infusion as an appetizer. Decoctions of the root are used by the Zulu for toothache.

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Apr 17, 2006 8:59 pm 
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I thought the leaves of the MG looked quite different than shown in the photo!?

:yaya:

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Apr 17, 2006 9:18 pm 
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To me the MG is the ugly duckling of Kruger.. not much to look at.. it is an untidy tree in many settings.. but its worth is endless.
..its toothbrush, toothfloss, medicine for many things, it is an indicator of certain soils..
endlessly Kruger.

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