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Shark and Oceanic Conservation in General

Find, identify & discuss the marine species of SANParks
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TheunsH
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Re: Shark and Oceanic Conservation in General

Unread postby TheunsH » Tue Jan 11, 2011 5:50 pm

Just arrived back from the South Coast, KZN. I had five great shark dives and the sharks were out in full force! During one of the dives we were closely scrutinised by between 100 and 200 hammerhead sharks!

The best about shark diving is the fact that there are no traffic jams down there at 40 meters. It is pure bliss!! :thumbs_up:

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Rooies
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Re: Shark and Oceanic Conservation in General

Unread postby Rooies » Wed Jan 26, 2011 11:30 am

I am not a diver Theuns, but do take ocean conservation seriously. During a recent fishing trip to Natal, one guy caught a shark, and tagged it, but when he wanted to release it, a man from Asian descent approached him and asked if he could take it. We objected and said that it is against the law. He stared at us and said that no local ever release sharks because the sharks compete with them for food. When asked what he was going to do with it, he said that he has got contacts who buy the shark fins for export to the East. Needless to say, we ordered him to go to a really hot place. The shark was released.
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TheunsH
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Re: Shark and Oceanic Conservation in General

Unread postby TheunsH » Thu Feb 17, 2011 11:13 am

Thank you Rooies and Sparks for your contributions! :thumbs_up:

Some good news as well:

Conservationists were cautiously celebrating today after Japan announced it was suspending its annual whale hunt, claiming its fleet’s safety had been compromised by antiwhaling activists in the Antarctic.It isn’t clear if the order to stop whaling amounts to the beginning of the end of Japan’s annual mission to the freezing waters of the Southern Ocean. But it is the strongest sign yet that international criticism, direct action, and weak consumption of whale meat at home are having an impact.The official line, supported almost without dissent in the Japanese media, is that the actions of the whaling fleet’s nemesis, the Sea Shepherd marine conservation group, have put the crew’s safety at risk.

Speaking to reporters in Tokyo, fisheries agency official Tatsuya Nakaoku said the fleet’s mother ship, the Nisshin Maru, had been "harassed" by the Sea Shepherd vessel the Bob Barker.The Japanese ship is now reported to be 2,000 nautical miles east of the hunting zone and heading towards Chilean waters in the Antarctic Ocean.Sea Shepherd, meanwhile, says this winter’s campaign has been its best yet. The fleet is thought to have caught only a small number of whales – between 30 and 100 by one estimate – since it arrived in the whaling grounds at the end of December.


Herewith the link: http://bionicbong.com/japan/news/japan- ... hale-hunt/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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TheunsH
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Re: Shark and Oceanic Conservation in General

Unread postby TheunsH » Sat Aug 27, 2011 10:47 am

Something interesting I have received from Wild about migrations:

Migration decreases disease
August 2, 2011,
It has previously been assumed that migratory animals spread diseases from one area to another. But a recent study has suggested the opposite.

Every year animals all over the world migrate – some of them over thousands of kilometres and over many months. In Tanzania the wildebeest migration is a well-known wildlife spectacle and along South African shores the annual sardine run attracts attention.

It’s been thought that migration increases disease. Surely when animals migrate their diseases travel along with them? Research done by the University of Georgia Odum School of Ecology points to a different pattern.

In the case of some parasites, migration enables animals to escape an environment that has become infested. While the hosts are away the parasite load decreases and the animals can return to a habitat that is relatively free of disease.

Migration also exacts a physical toll and disease-ridden animals can’t survive long journeys. The result is that infected individuals are removed from the group and the most virulent strains are eliminated.

These new insights come from a study on monarch butterflies. Butterflies in cool climes like Canada migrate south to spend the winter in central Mexico. In more temperate places like Florida the monarchs don’t migrate. Researchers discovered that the parasite load is highest in the butterflies that don’t migrate and lowest in the ones that journey the furthest.

This research emphasises the importance of migration to the health of a species. Unfortunately, nowadays successful migration is hampered by deforestation and urbanisation. Many migratory routes are blocked by dams, fences and agricultural land, where livestock and migratory species are exposed to each other’s pathogens.

"Migration is a strategy that has evolved over millions of years in response to selection pressures driven by resources, predators and lethal parasitic infections,” says researcher Barbara Han from the University of Georgia Odum School of Ecology. “Any changes to this strategy could translate to changes in disease dynamics.”
Source:
S. Altizer, R. Bartel, B. A. Han. Animal Migration and Infectious Disease Risk. Science, 2011; 331 (6015): 296 DOI: 10.1126/science.1194694
Viewed online [http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110120142323.htm]



Here is the source: https://www.wildcard.co.za/blog.htm?act ... st&id=2469


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