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 Post subject: Augrabies: History
Unread postPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2006 12:19 pm 
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Location: Augrabies Falls National Park
Based on a client's question, here is a very brief history of Augrabies Falls and how and why it became a national park. (Based on information received from Head Office staff.)

The name Augrabies was given to the Water Fall by a Swede, Hendrik Jakob Wikar, when he passed there in 1799. The name is derived from the Nama word as the Khoi people would refer to 'Aukoerebis' meaning the "Place of Great Noise." This refers to the Orange River water thundering its way down the 56 m spectacular main Water Fall.

In 1954 the Upington Publicity Association requested the National Parks Board to proclaim the water fall a national park. After the Minister of Lands approved the Park in principle in 1955, the Department of Water Affairs objected to the proclamation of a national park. Within a series of negotiations, Augrabies Falls National Park was eventually proclaimed on 5 August 1966. The park currently consists of 55 383 hectares. The establishment was based on the following objectives:
-To conserve and restore the biotic diversity of the Orange River Broken Veld with its associated flora and fauna
-To maintain the Augrabies Water Fall and its surroundings in an unspoilt state
-To provide opportunities for Environmental Education and
-To provide opportunities for research of the fascinating flora and fauna.

Check here soon for the history of the famed "Water Snake" in the near future.

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2006 9:17 pm 
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Location: Augrabies Falls National Park
restio wrote:
Thanks, Sandy. It's always interesting to know the background of a National Park. The Nama were spot-on: the Falls are LOUD!


How true, especially when the water level is higher than normal. And besides the noise, the ground vibration (which we don't feel) is quite tremendous.

I arrived shortly before our first big surge of water in March, and I couldn't figure out why I kept thinking it was windy outside because my windows were rattling but it wasn't. My boss told me how the water fall causes the rattling, and that's completely true! With the water level at around 135 cumecs, as it was today, the windows don't rattle at all. But I've noticed that once the water level surpasses 500 cumecs or so, they start rattling continuously. I actually had to put paper between the panes to sleep at night!

BTW, the water level is supposed to rise to about 350 cumecs over the weekend, according to the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry (DWAF). That's over 7 times the average which is 50-70 cumecs!

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 Post subject: Gariep Monster
Unread postPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2006 11:19 am 
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Location: Augrabies Falls National Park
Hi Everyone,

Due to a lot of work and an unfortunate lightening strike, I haven't had a lot of forum time lately. But I ran across this story again, and thought some of you might enjoy learning about the "Gariep Monster" legend. Sadly, the author is unknown, but the legend is quite interesting. Enjoy! (For the Afrikaans version, see my next posting.)

THE LEGEND OF THE GARIEP MONSTER

Since ancient times she has been seen. A long snakelike creature with scales on her coils that shimmer in the moonlight in the swelling waters of the Gariep River. And on her forehead a sparkling gem like a spotless diamond from which lightning flashes. The Bushmen believed if you were able to capture this jewel then eternal happiness would be yours - but should she mesmerise you with her dazzling jewel, she'd capture you in the folds of her coils and draw you underneath the water to her den where she would devour you under the dark brown milling froth of the Augrabies waterfall!

Centuries ago a young Bushman had seen how she concealed her bright jewel amongst the reeds just before she ate her morning meal. The gem shone so brightly that he had to screw up his eyes whilst he crawled through the reeds towards the gem -he glanced over his shoulder-yes, she was still feeding peacefully - without a sound he crept nearer and nearer- and when he reached the gem he swiftly threw his jackal-kaross over the gem so that the dazzling light of the gem would not blind him. He held the gem tightly between his hands and dashed like the wind along the riverbank and then across the plain, and at the foot of the Renosterkop he hid it deep down in a crevice in the rocks.

Since that day that young Bushman was the happiest man on earth. His enemies left him in peace; when hunting he never missed a shot with his bow and arrow: and game was always plentiful. Just one thing disturbed him- when it is full moon, he hears on the evening breeze - how she wails and weeps.

The Gariep Monster unceasingly seeks for her jewel. No one can help her. Not yellow-fish, nor leguan, nor kingfisher or baboon. Then one day she asked otter whether he had not seen what had become of her jewel. He then told her of the yellow two-legged creature that had wrapped the gem in a jackal-kaross and had run away with it. However, the young Bushman had heard from spring-hare that the Gariep Monster was hot on his trail and he got the bright idea of taking the gem out of the rock-crevice at Renosterkop and to go and once more conceal it in the reeds near the river exactly where he had found it.

That very same night while the Bushmen danced and sang around the fire, her voice rang out like an angry lion amongst them: "one of you has stolen my jewel!" she cried. Flames were coming from her jaws. The Bushmen denied it and shuddered with fear. Only one young Bushman bravely answered and offered to help her in her search. It was the same young Bushman who had stolen the gem. He took her to the reeds and pretended to search. Suddenly he cried out: "See! You didn't look well, here is your precious gem!"

The Bushmen gave the young brave man an honorary title and rewarded him with gifts because through him the Gariep Monster was happy once more. At full moon they dance till daybreak around their fires for she does not weep anymore on the evening breeze. And just before daybreak they hear her laugh a rumbling sound as when the Gariep River is in flood and like the sound of many raindrops after a long drought.

Even today, though the Bushmen have long since gone, if you are fortunate, you can see her at full moon as she frolics in the surging waters of the Gariep River and in her shining curving coils, the flashing jewel on her forehead.

And the young Bushman was happy for the rest of his life, even though he didn't have the gem anymore. He lived to a ripe old age and had many children and grandchildren. But, at full moon around the fires, they were afraid of him - his eyes shone strangely in the fire-light as he, every now and then, glanced furtively towards the reeds on the banks of the Gariep.

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 Post subject: Augrabies - Origin / Meanings of place names
Unread postPosted: Wed Dec 01, 2010 3:13 pm 
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Location: Randparkridge, South Africa
Hi,
Can anyone help me with the following:

Ararat - Who named it and why?
Gamkaip - Meaning?
Kukurasiep - Meaning?

Thanks
Peter


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 Post subject: Re: Augrabies - Origin / Meanings of place names
Unread postPosted: Wed Dec 01, 2010 3:48 pm 
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Peter 1,

I will get the guide from Augrabies to do some research and I will also have a look into it and let you know.

Jannie

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 Post subject: Re: Augrabies - Origin / Meanings of place names
Unread postPosted: Thu Dec 02, 2010 8:45 am 
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Peter i'm already working on this,but want to make sure that i give you the correct meanings,as the pronounciation of these words differ.I'm in contact with the local people and tryiing to see if there's information in the park with regard to these words.
You will hear from me soon.


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 Post subject: Re: Augrabies - Origin / Meanings of place names
Unread postPosted: Thu Dec 02, 2010 12:55 pm 
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Location: johannesburg (but soon in Kruger)
hey
i've been looking every where for those meanings, but i can't find them. ill still keep looking


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 Post subject: Re: Augrabies - Origin / Meanings of place names
Unread postPosted: Fri Dec 03, 2010 8:18 am 
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Peter1 you may correct me on this one but I think the name Gamkaip is not attached to the park,however it is a name of a farm in the Blouputs section.I've contacted this farmer and according to him it is pronounce as Gamaip without the k.
Meaning-fountain in the stream
Kukurasiep-means river of thorns,refers to trees such as camel/sweet thorn as well as buffalo thorn occuring in the dry-river bed.
Ararat and Arrowpoint may have something in common as they are oposite to each other,from there the names.
Who named it and why i will still find this out.


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 Post subject: Re: Augrabies - Origin / Meanings of place names
Unread postPosted: Wed Dec 15, 2010 10:53 am 
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According to one of the rangers in the park which was working here since the proclamation of the park it is the park manager from that time Mr. Piet Bronkhorst who give the name Ararat and the other names in the park.
Ararat derives from biblical times,and refers to Noag's ark which landed on the mountaineous Ararat.
Furher reading can be done in the old testament Genesis 8:4


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 Post subject: Re: Augrabies - Origin / Meanings of place names
Unread postPosted: Fri Dec 31, 2010 5:52 pm 
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Location: Randparkridge, South Africa
Hi,
To Augrabies & Kgalagadi Guru as well as Ossendryver, my apologies for not acknowledging your efforts and response. In the past this site informed when there was a reply, which it has not done!

Maybe because of the new website development??

Gamcaip is a river in the Park and also the district name?

Since my last request I have stumbled across another name.

The waterhole, Hollenbacht. Who is this person? Why was the waterhole named after him?

I understand the origin of Ararat but which part reminded him of the mountain where Noah's Ark landed up? Maybe Arrowpoint is pointing at Ararat? Very intriguing.

Thanks
Peter


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 Post subject: Re: Augrabies - Origin / Meanings of place names
Unread postPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 8:55 am 
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Hi peter1
You are refering to the Gariep river as well as the district name and not Gameip.
Holombacht is the surname of the person to which the farm belongs to when the area was bought,this is on the central section,thats why the waterhole name is also holombacht.
These names was also given to the waterholes in general to know which areas you are talking about for operational reasons.
I still have to find out the meaning of Gariep.


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 Post subject: Re: Augrabies - Origin / Meanings of place names
Unread postPosted: Fri Jan 07, 2011 2:54 pm 
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Hi,
Thanks for that.
There is definitely a river called Gamkaip. Next to the Bul River. This is per the 1:50 000 map.
Is the spelling Hollenbacht or Holombacht? Nardus spells it Hollenbacht.

Regards
Peter


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 Post subject: Re: Augrabies: History
Unread postPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2011 12:10 pm 
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Tiger Cage
I've inserted this pic to show you how it looks like,know there was nothing inside :lol:
Image
DSC00174 by closed4, on Flickr
And from the side.
Image
DSC00175 by closed4, on Flickr
This cultural inheritance resource of the Park is situated in Augrabies Falls National Park, and consist out of a rock structure which have been pack. The structure is also closed on the top with a opening on one side.
According to orally tradition farmers have use this structure before the proclamation of the park to capture leopards. In the old days people have refer to leopards as tigers from there the name.
This trap cage is situated on the klipspringer trail.

Quiver tree inscriptions
These are quiver trees in the area on which inscriptions are been carved out. Althought these inscriptions usually contains initials or dates, there is particular one quiver tree in the Zeekoeisteek area in the Park with a whole phrase which tells a story.
Here it follows: "DIE WEER IS MOOI 11DES. 1933 DAAR IS HOOP"
Which means that the weather looks promising and that there is hope.
Underneath the inscription is the initials "HK" been carved. According to orally tradition the inscription has been made by two farmers. They was Toop Mostert and Henry Klindt. These two farmers was with their sheep in the veld when clouds began to conglomerate. 1933- The date on which occur on the tree, is been regarded as a time of one of the severist drought within living memory. The two farmers was so moved due to the clouds, which leads to the inscription on the quiver tree made by them.

Khoi graves
One of the more visual examples of cultural inheritance resources in the Augrabies area is the rock graves which can be associated with the Late Stoneage, and overall with the Khoi from that time .
The first written reference to these graves in the area is in 1779 been made by a European, Robert Jacob Gordon.
Althought it is difficult to bind the graves to the San or Khoi in the Late Stoneage, there can be distinquished between Khoi and San graves. Khoi graves are been recognized by heaped up graves and a few grave belongings. This are less visible in San graves.
Research which have been made by Dr. Allan Morris, a anatomist which belongs to the University of Cape Town , and which have done research on the Late Stoneage graves in the area of the Park, suggest that most of these graves date back to the 18th and 19th century.


Last edited by Augrabies Guru on Wed Mar 14, 2012 10:38 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Augrabies: History
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2011 10:40 am 
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Heliograph
On the eastern side of Zeekoeisteek there is a hill known as Spieelkop.
At the end of the 19th century this hill was already used as a heliograph station. A heliograph is a apparatus which work with the help of the sun sun to transmit messages with a mirror over long distances. This explains the name of the hill.

In 1897 the telegraphic line was only been laid from Cape Town to Kenhard. Messages was sent from Kenhard with the help of the heliograph from Driekop(Kenhard) to Spieelkop(Kakamas)(which must not be confused with the Spieelkop at Zeekoeisteek in the Park.
From Kakamas messages was sent in a western direction to Spieelkop at Zeekoeisteek,and from there westwards to Schuit Drift and than all the way to Pofadder.
It is also evident why Spieelkop(Zeekoeisteek) has been used as a heliograph station, as it is visible from far away.


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 Post subject: Re: Augrabies: History
Unread postPosted: Fri Dec 02, 2011 8:59 am 
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Medicinal/ Traditional plantuses:

Jan Twak Nicotiana glauca
Wilde Tabak(exotic specie)
Traditional uses:
- Adult plants was used in the construction of houses.
Medicinal uses:
- Leaves that have been warmed was place on the fore-head to relieve head ache's.
- Also been used for soar throats by placing a leave over the effected area.
- Leaves that have been warmed was also placed on soar feet.

Kankerbos Sutherlandia frutescens
Kalkoenbos,Belbos,Gansies
Medicinal use:
- Leaves are been used in the treatment for colds and stomach ailments

Lemoendoring Parkinsonia africana
Traditional use:
-Seeds was used as a substitute for coffee.

Karmedik Dicoma capensis
Verkouebos
Medicinal use:
- Decoction of the leaves was used for the treatment of soar eyes as well as for colds.


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