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 Post subject: Re: Grasshoppers and locusts
Unread postPosted: Sat Oct 23, 2010 7:12 pm 
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Award: Sighting of the Year - Non Predator Award: Travel Tale of the Year for KNP (2012)
Photographed at Suikerbosrand. I am not sure what the name of this grasshopper is and anyone kind enough to identify please let me know.

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 Post subject: Re: Grasshoppers and locusts
Unread postPosted: Sat Oct 23, 2010 8:27 pm 
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Impressive photo ADW :thumbs_up: its one of the Gastrimargus species, and all 15 are extremely similar looking

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 Post subject: Re: Grasshoppers and locusts
Unread postPosted: Sun Oct 24, 2010 8:55 am 
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Thanks Oddesy. :D

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 Post subject: Re: Grasshoppers and locusts
Unread postPosted: Sun Oct 24, 2010 9:36 am 
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This grasshopper had his hind legs stretched out for a number of seconds. Just after the photo was taken he resumed into a ready to jump position.

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 Post subject: Re:
Unread postPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2010 1:03 pm 
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PhilQ wrote:
With expert help the riddle what species this grasshopper is has now been resolved:
Quote:
The grasshopper in your photo is indeed a member of the family Pamphagidae. It is a female of the genus The(unfortunately, it would be impossible to tell which species of Lobosceliana based on a picture alone.)
Species of this genus are highly sexually dimorphic, and while females are completely wingless, the males have long, leathery wings, and produce very loud stridulations.

Phil, and the rest of you interested parties:
I apologise for not thinking to respond to that question simply because it had passed by the time I saw it, but I was just checking my outstanding correspondence and it occurred to me that I never have seen any publication describing an observation I made on a Pamphagid female a few decades ago, Very possibly also in the genus Lobosceliana For all I could tell from memory.
Be that as it may, I found her charming. Having caught her and taken her back to the laboratory for observation, I was nonplussed a day or two later to find one of her droppings (cylindrical, somewhat curved, almost bean-shaped, and in fact the size of a small dried bean) lying in an otherwise empty beaker. Oh well...
Next day I was sitting at my desk, reading, when a small object went whizzing around my office, bumped into something and apparently vanished. Later I found another dropping on the floor! Errr...
I think it was the following day that I happened to be looking at my guest. She began to defecate, which was a rather slow, deliberate process of extruding one dropping. It stopped when perhaps three quarters of the dropping was exposed. Then she calmly lifted one hind leg and with the air of a smoker tapping ash off the end of a cigar, she kicked that hard, little (but in proportion to size, quite large) turd with sufficient force to send it bouncing about my office/laboratory.
On the one hand I found it to be a charming observation of the behaviour pattern, but it also is an instructive example of behaviour adapted to remove faecal material from the whereabouts of the producer. Various insects and some other animals have adaptations, sometimes striking adaptations, for the purpose. Accumulations of faeces often are clues to the presence of prey, and in the wild the droppings of such a grasshopper typically will land several metres away at least, not affording a useful clue to enemies.
In biology I often find it breathtaking to contemplate the sort of thing that can be remarkably interesting (well, certainly interesting to me!)


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 Post subject: Re: Insect ID needed
Unread postPosted: Wed Dec 22, 2010 6:39 pm 
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Can anyone help with ID of this — is it a locust?

Image

And are these caterpillars related to it (they were close by)?

Image

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 Post subject: Re: Insect ID needed
Unread postPosted: Thu Dec 23, 2010 3:21 pm 
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Processionary caterpillars

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 Post subject: Re: Insect ID needed
Unread postPosted: Mon Dec 27, 2010 7:49 pm 
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Jon Richfield wrote:
arks wrote:
Can anyone help with ID of this — is it a locust?
Hi Arks, No, that is not a locust. Locusts are generally large, shorthorned grasshoppers, particularly those that swarm. They tend to be inconspicuously coloured and athletic in shape; also good to eat, if you are into eating grasshoppers.

Grasshoppers are in the order Orthoptera. This one is in the family Pyrgomorphidae, the family of poisonous, smelly, unathletic, aposematically coloured shorthorned grasshoppers. They are variously called "foaming" or spitting" or "stinking" grasshoppers. Many members of the family tend to lay their eggs in large batches and the hoppers stick together in carpets, looking unattractive to predators. They are slow and clumsy, which they can afford because not may creatures will feed on them. The colours of the young tend to be surprisingly elegant, They are unpopular, but unless you happen to be a farmer with a problem I don't know why; They are harmless and intriguing.

Quote:
And are these caterpillars related to it (they were close by)?


The caterpillars are about as distantly related as they could be and still be insects. They are in the order Lepidopters. and they will turn into moths.
I recommend that you give them a wide berth; they look like members of the processionary caterpillar family.: the Thaumetopoeidae. We have quite a few of them in SA, and many of them have dangerously stinging hairs. I seem to remember that we had some discussion on them in the forum a few months back. I am a bit rushed, but perhaps you could check back?
If you draw a blank, say so, and I'll go into greater detail.

Mind you; I cannot be sure of the family, because there are several other families that have hairy worms, some looking fairly similar, but the others also deserve some care in handling them!

Belated thanks for your detailed reply, Jon 8) Interesting that the grasshopper and the caterpillars are unrelated as they were on different parts of the same roadside shrub :hmz:


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 Post subject: Re: Insect ID needed
Unread postPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2012 1:42 am 
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Can anyone help with an ID for what this LBR has caught? Seen on the Old Main Road (S144) on 21 April 2012.

Image

@ Africat: And it even looks chocolate coated! :wink: :tongue:


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 Post subject: Re: Insect ID needed
Unread postPosted: Sun Sep 02, 2012 4:15 am 
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Arks, it is difficult to tell, but looks like it may be a Brown Locust (Locustana pardalina).

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 Post subject: Help identification - Grasshopper
Unread postPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2012 6:49 am 
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Dear friends,

Could you please help me identifying this grasshopper we saw in the Masorini Heritage Site at January 20th 2011?

Image

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Charbel

1 June 2013 - Twee Rivieren
2 June 2013 - Kieliekrankie
3-4 June 2013 - Kalahari Tented Camp
5 June 2013 - Twee Rivieren
6-8 June 2013 - Nossob
9 June 2013 - Gharagab
10 June 2013 - Grootkolk
11 June 2013 - Nossob
12 June 2013 - Twee Rivieren


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 Post subject: Re: Help identification - Grasshopper
Unread postPosted: Fri Dec 28, 2012 5:20 am 
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Looks to be an "Elegant Grasshopper" Zonocerus elegans.

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 Post subject: Re: Insect ID needed
Unread postPosted: Sun May 26, 2013 6:00 pm 
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Hello,

Can anyone help me identify this colorful fellow that I found in mid-May at the Pinnacle in Blyde River Canyon (luckily not in my chalet, lol) ? I love his face, looks like the Grinch that stole Christmas !

Image

Image


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 Post subject: Re: Insect ID needed
Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 17, 2013 7:39 am 
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arks wrote:
Here's another colourful gogga that I need ID help with. Seen in my garden in Darling in early January 2013.

Image


This is definitely a Orthoptera - Family: Pyrogomorphidae. My bet would be on a Milkweed, maybe Common Milkweed.

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