Skip to Content

Weaver: Red-billed Buffalo-Weaver

Identify and index birds in Southern Africa
Nannie
Posts: 171
Joined: Fri Nov 04, 2005 11:03 am
Location: Marloth,is where i want to be.

Unread postby Nannie » Mon Jul 28, 2008 8:50 pm

Also in Satara on a braai.
Image
Last edited by Nannie on Tue Sep 28, 2010 10:14 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Bahamut
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 170
Joined: Mon Aug 04, 2008 4:21 pm
Location: South Africa

Red-billed Buffalo Weaver

Unread postby Bahamut » Fri Sep 05, 2008 5:57 pm

Image
Red-billed Buffalo-Weaver?
My literature don't mention black bills on these and it doesn't look like a juv ... ?

Apologies, old not so good photos, somewhere in Kruger four years ago :(
Last edited by Bahamut on Fri Sep 05, 2008 8:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
wildtuinman
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Posts: 5505
Award: Birder of the Year (2013)
Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2004 10:27 am
Location: Chasing down the rarities

Re: Identification Help - General Birds

Unread postby wildtuinman » Mon Sep 08, 2008 5:19 am

Bahamut,

This a very soon to be adult male Red-billed Buffalo Weaver.
668
Latest Lifer(s): Buff-spotted Flufftail, Tree Pipit, Dimorphic Egret, Lesser Jacana, Citrine Wagtail, Black-tailed Godwit

Follow me as I bird on Twitter @wildtuinman

User avatar
Moegaai
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
Posts: 242
Joined: Fri Nov 14, 2008 11:15 am
Location: Jozi, RSA

Re: Identification Help - General Birds

Unread postby Moegaai » Wed Feb 11, 2009 8:55 pm

To differentiate in real life is very easy - the Bufallo-Weaver is much larger than the Indigobird (new name for Widow Finches!), so the Indigobirds are much more stocky in appearance. The Weaver also has very red bill and legs (this pic doesn't help much for this statement!), compared to the Village Indigobird's pinkish-red bill and legs. Then also the Weaver has definite white flanks that show on the wing edge when perched, whilst Indigobirds only have a bit of irridescence on the wings that might potentially show up light in the right light, but never white. :thumbs_up:

User avatar
Elsa
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 13943
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:31 pm
Location: Ballito, KZN North Coast, South Africa

Re: Identification Help - General Birds

Unread postby Elsa » Wed Apr 15, 2009 10:50 am

Please could someone help me with the ID of thes birds seen at Leeupan in Kruger in Feb this year, they had been bathing so do look a bit bedraggled.

ImageLarger

ImageLarger
Where ever you go, go with all your Heart.

User avatar
deefstes
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 749
Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2005 1:43 pm
Location: Jo'burg

Re: Identification Help - General Birds

Unread postby deefstes » Wed Apr 15, 2009 11:14 am

Elsa wrote:Please could someone help me with the ID of thes birds seen at Leeupan in Kruger in Feb this year, they had been bathing so do look a bit bedraggled.

ImageLarger

ImageLarger

Subadult Red-billed Buffalo-Weaver.
"Weaseling out of things is important to learn. It's what separates us from the animals ... except the weasel." -Homer Simpson

User avatar
Moegaai
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
Posts: 242
Joined: Fri Nov 14, 2008 11:15 am
Location: Jozi, RSA

Re: Identification Help - General Birds

Unread postby Moegaai » Wed Apr 15, 2009 11:20 am

Hi Elsa,

Everything about these guys tells me they're sub-ad Red-billed Buffalo-Weaver. The GISS, white wingpatch showing as white line, and the RBBW sub-ad looks like adult but with dark to horn-colour bill. And there is a big nest at Leeupan...

User avatar
Elsa
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 13943
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:31 pm
Location: Ballito, KZN North Coast, South Africa

Re: Identification Help - General Birds

Unread postby Elsa » Wed Apr 15, 2009 2:41 pm

Thanks so much for the ID of the sub adult Buffalo-Weaver, Deefstes and Moegaai, much appreciated. :D
Where ever you go, go with all your Heart.

User avatar
Crested Barbet
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 488
Joined: Fri Aug 21, 2009 5:34 pm

Re: Weaver: Red-billed Buffalo-Weaver

Unread postby Crested Barbet » Sat Sep 05, 2009 2:00 pm

Red-billed buffalo-weavers fighting, Satara, KNP.
Image

User avatar
granjan
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 565
Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2007 12:20 am
Location: cornwall uk

Re: Weaver: Red-billed Buffalo-Weaver

Unread postby granjan » Mon Apr 19, 2010 7:38 pm

Saw this one in Satara too.
Image

User avatar
Ludwig
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 143
Joined: Mon Mar 12, 2007 3:27 pm
Location: Bavaria

Re: Identification Help - General Birds

Unread postby Ludwig » Wed May 12, 2010 3:01 pm

Hello birders,

working on my most recent pictures from Krugerpark I have to recognise:
The more I try the less I can!

I am still not able to identify some birds. Are you willing to help me?

Best regards,

Ludwig

Image
#26
Last edited by Ludwig on Fri May 14, 2010 10:45 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Josh of the Bushveld
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 1904
Joined: Tue May 19, 2009 2:15 pm
Location: Johannesburg - too far from the closest Sanpark

Re: Identification Help - General Birds

Unread postby Josh of the Bushveld » Wed May 12, 2010 3:47 pm

Ludwig:

#26: I think Red-billed Buffalo-weaver but not certain
The 'mite formerly known as joshilewis

FGASA Level 1 Guide

Glen Reenen TR

15-18 June: Berg-en-dal

User avatar
Johan van Rensburg
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Award: Birder of the Year (2014)
Posts: 2621
Awards: Birder of the Year (2014) & Sighting of the Year - Birds (2013)
Joined: Wed Sep 06, 2006 3:33 pm
Location: Jam Street

Re: Weaver: Red-billed Buffalo-Weaver

Unread postby Johan van Rensburg » Sun Nov 18, 2012 11:15 am

Satara seems to be one of the easiest spots to "study" these birds as there are numerous nests in the camp near the huts.

Image

Buffalo weavers are unique amongst all birds in that both males and females possess a phalloid organ, a phallus-like structure anterior to the cloaca, the terminal region of the gut into which the intestinal, urinary and genital canals open. Observations and experiments with red-billed buffalo weavers in captivity revealed that the phalloid appendage functioned as a stimulatory organ which necessitated protracted copulation in order to induce male ‘orgasm’ and ejaculation, a feature also unique to this species.

The species is very much a polyandrous breeder with cooperating males fathering chicks in the same nest, feeding the young and defending the nest together. Brief copulations happen a lot both with females and with other males where no sperm transfer takes place. A minority of copulations successfully transfer sperm when repeated mountings over a period lasting as long as 30 minutes took place. It follows that there is a lot of competition among males to be fathers, even though genetics again tells us that the cooperating territorial males sharing a female are at least sometimes related (though not usually close relatives). What the phalliod organ actually does isn't entirely clear - it's not the route for sperm to flow through - but apparently it needs stimulation before females can be inseminated by the male. Buffalo weavers are the only birds to experience anything that looks like an orgasm (but only after repeated copulation), and only at the point of ‘orgasm’ (the main effect seems to be causing the male to pull the female closer to him) is sperm transferred to the female.

Red-billed buffalo weavers breed in compound nests made up of separate "lodges", each with a number of nesting chambers within them. The males are polygamous, each controlling 1-8 nest chambers and up to about 3 females. Usually there is one dominant male in a colony who has the most females and egg chambers, while other males may have one female and a few chambers. The males vigorously defend their lodges against other males, using aggressive displays and calls and females within the harem do not tolerate each others presence in their egg chambers. Colonies may use a different system altogether, with two males cooperating with each other to build the nest, both defending the territory and helping to feed the chicks.

Image

The nests are constructed by the males entirely of dry, thorny twigs. Some of the size of the twigs are enormous and the bird has to balance it carefully before he is capable of flying off with it, like this bird seen collecting building materials at Satara. Then each egg chamber is completed by a female that will line it with dry grasses and other soft materials.
671 Latest lifer: Black coucal

jacquiandphil
Posts: 50
Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2011 10:07 am

Ex-Re: Identification Help - General Birds

Unread postby jacquiandphil » Thu Feb 28, 2013 10:33 am

Yesterday I was helped to load photos. Today I'll be grateful for confirmation of names, for years I've called one of the mousebirds rosey faced- I now know its called redfaced. So I'm asking for help with these before I get into bad habits and learn the wrong name.
All at Lower Sabie camp from amaizing riverfront tents, August 2012

6) Image
P1020025 by jacquiandphil, on Flickr
Redbilled Buffalo Weaver?

Thanks to anyone who can confirm my names or correct me.
Jacquie
Jacqui and Phil
July 2015:
24/07 outside park
25-27 Nossob
27-29 Kieliekrankie
29-01/08 Mata Mata
01-03 Kalahari Tent
03-07 Twee Rivieren
07-09 just west of Upington

User avatar
wildtuinman
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Posts: 5505
Award: Birder of the Year (2013)
Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2004 10:27 am
Location: Chasing down the rarities

Re: Identification Help - General Birds

Unread postby wildtuinman » Thu Feb 28, 2013 10:45 am

Spot on!
668
Latest Lifer(s): Buff-spotted Flufftail, Tree Pipit, Dimorphic Egret, Lesser Jacana, Citrine Wagtail, Black-tailed Godwit

Follow me as I bird on Twitter @wildtuinman


Return to “Birding in Southern Africa”