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Unread postPosted: Mon Aug 07, 2006 9:12 pm 
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saraf wrote:
Pilane - would there have been a more humane way to deal with the situation?

Can you disentangle yourself/someone from a python?


ja I agree with you Sara :? ...know a fully grown python must be immensly strong, but surely there is a way to get them to "let go"...


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Unread postPosted: Mon Aug 07, 2006 9:31 pm 
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A second person to assist and you should be able to get a python to release. Take it behind the head and uncoil. Just be carefull around the sharp edge...
If it is a 4m+ boy or girl it becomes a bit more diffucult...(interesting :twisted: ).

Golden rule is not to panic.

I do believe that pythons do not eat adult humans (unless you are 4ft tall)


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Unread postPosted: Tue Aug 08, 2006 8:40 am 
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This story was in Veldwagters vertel verder. The snake was well over 4 meters, closer to six.

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Unread postPosted: Fri Aug 18, 2006 6:36 am 
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I re-read the story last night. It is uncertain whether the python died. It dissapeared into the water.

The field ranger passed out from the pressure the 4m plus snake was placing on his chest. He said that he could feel his ribs starting to crack(which I almost can't believe) just before he lost consciousness.

His colleauge stabbed the snake with a knife after which the snake let go and moved off.

The snake was estimated to weigh around 50kgs.

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Unread postPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2006 7:04 am 
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H4-1 just south of LS on our way to a morning walk. My first sighting of an alive one in Kruger.

Image

Image

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Nov 22, 2006 12:25 pm 
Another one for the snake experts (Pilane :yaya: )

Without going into to much detail: we found a dead impala lam in Marloth this past weekend….it appeared to be wet, although it seemed too old to be newborn. The conservation guys that came out, immediately confirmed that a python caused the death. The “wet” was actually a slime and covered half of the body…up to the point were it was swallowed by the python before it was spit out again.

Questions:
1. The lam could not have been dead for too long. We found it Friday evening (Friday was a hot day) and even by Saturday morning it still did not start smelling. However, its head, that was swallowed first, and cover in this slime, was a blueish colour by Saturday morning. Does this slime contain digestive enzymes that caused this decolourisation?

Pilane wrote:
They kill by constriction, but interestingly the do not break any bones of the prey. They constrict every time when the prey exhale until the prey dies of cardiac failure due to the fact that it cannot breathe anymore...


2. How long will it normally take a python to kill something like an impala lam in this fashion?

3. The conservation guys told us that the python would probably stick around in the area. Is this true? Are they territorial?
We have a nice waterhole and I read that they like water :? …..Jumbo wishing see could see this guy/girl :wink:

4. How big will a python be that can kill a impala lam of about 1-2 weeks old and swallow it almost halfway?

5. Any ideas why it spit it out?…might it be that it was too big to swallow?

4. This is the second time we have seen an impala lam killed by a python. The first time was between Olifants and Letaba…the lam was lying in the open but the python hid under a bush closeby (we could only make out part of it)…it was hiding because of all the cars congregating at the scene.
Has anybody else on the forum seen a python with an impala lam? I was wondering if they await these births to fill their stomachs?

5. And lastly, not really to do with pythons, but I am very intrigued. As I said, by Friday evening the lam did not smell at all and also was not bloated even though it was lying in the open and Friday was a hot day. Yet Rigor Mortis already set in….the body was stiff. I know that when people die under severe stress, that rigor mortis can set in immediately…does the same count for animals?


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Unread postPosted: Wed Nov 22, 2006 5:06 pm 
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Jumbo wrote:
Has anybody else on the forum seen a python with an impala lam? I was wondering if they await these births to fill their stomachs?


Yes, I have. I saw a python swallowing an impala lamb in a private game reserve in November 1999.
I didn't get any good photos because the python was in high grass and we didn't get close because we didn't want to disturb the python. But here are the links to 2 photos anyway:

Python swallowing impala 1
Python swallowing impala 2

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Last edited by Katja on Wed Nov 22, 2006 6:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 8:16 am 
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Jumbo wrote:
Those are great shots Katja! 8)
I do not think people often get the chance to see the python actually swallowing its kill…it appears that they are quite sensitive about getting attention while “eating”. :?


:lol: :lol: Don't stand on the business end of a python when it has or is busy getting something in its gut. They have the inept ability to shower you with a load of dead, dark, more foul smelling then the old fish in the hotcap trick, mass of blood. In one of the "veldwagters vertel" books, mentioning of this is made. :lol: :lol:

Yummy. :twisted: :twisted:

It is assumed that they will do this to get away from the threatening danger situation you as numbnut human present @ that time.

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Thu Nov 30, 2006 11:12 pm 
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Quote:
1. The lam could not have been dead for too long. We found it Friday evening (Friday was a hot day) and even by Saturday morning it still did not start smelling. However, its head, that was swallowed first, and cover in this slime, was a blueish colour by Saturday morning. Does this slime contain digestive enzymes that caused this decolourisation?


The python's saliva might have some digestive properties but not like venom of venomous snakes, I doubt it if this caused the dicolouration

Quote:
2. How long will it normally take a python to kill something like an impala lam in this fashion?

It depends on the size of the snake, but normaly it would not take too long to constrict prey of this size once it gets a decent grip on it... a few minutes

Quote:
3. The conservation guys told us that the python would probably stick around in the area. Is this true? Are they territorial?
We have a nice waterhole and I read that they like water …..Jumbo wishing see could see this guy/girl


I won't say that they are stricly territorial but they will live for a long time in an area if undisturbed.

Quote:
4. How big will a python be that can kill a impala lam of about 1-2 weeks old and swallow it almost halfway?

A python from 2m would have no problem taking an impala lamb of 1-2 weeks old.

Quote:
5. Any ideas why it spit it out?…might it be that it was too big to swallow?

A snake will rarely take something too big to swallow, but it can happen. I would rather say that it was disturbed...

Quote:
.. I was wondering if they await these births to fill their stomachs?

don't think reptile intelligence has reached this level yet :twisted:


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2006 7:47 am 
Thank you Pilane! 8)

Pilane wrote:
Quote:
5. Any ideas why it spit it out?…might it be that it was too big to swallow?

A snake will rarely take something too big to swallow, but it can happen. I would rather say that it was disturbed...


:hmz: Disturbance…. I wonder if my poor SO, that I send into the bush in the dark to go and find out why the impala ewe was so upset, might have constituted the “disturbance”….Eish, the man would really have toi-toied if a python wrapped itself around his leg in that dark bush. :lol: :twisted:

macho mouse wrote:
I am wondering whether the blue colour could have been cause by the the breaking of smaller blood vessels due to the constiction.


I think you are right MM! :idea:

It would be sooooo 8) to see this snake! We only had two sightings of them before and that was in Kruger.

I read that it takes these snakes up to 10 years to reach sexual maturity…..now I'm wondering what is the average life expectancy of a python? ….has to be quite a few years if they can only start reproducing after 10 years.


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2007 8:13 pm 
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Pythons (all snakes for that matter) will never attack a human being. They purely defend themselfs when they feel threatened.

What whould you do if cornered in a confined space, poked at with a garden rake or stood on, dragged around by your tail and when someone stumble into your nest etc. etc. :wink: and to top it by something that is more than 100x your size


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2007 8:07 am 
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macho mouse wrote:
GR, one of my clients had a very nasty experience with an African Python where it tried to attack while they were climbing down an embankment. They had not seen it and nearly stumbled into its nest.
It was a female covering eggs, so I don't know whether that influenced its aggresiveness.

I have also heard of people being allowed to touch one curled up in a tree. That does not sound aggro to me.

I did see one try to take a nip out of a ranger when he tried to measure it. They are amazingly strong snakes.

I am no expert, I am just giving my own account.


Thanks for your reply Mousey.
This one of mine does'nt really seem to be too aggresive. It's hissing and puffing like crazy, but [Touch Wood] hasn't bitten me... :?


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Unread postPosted: Thu Mar 15, 2007 2:48 pm 
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Hi all

my fav topics snakes.
I have never had the pleasure of seeing an ARP in the wild but have had many experiences with them. They are an absolutely fantastic species of snake.

As for the aggression.
They have a reputation for being a more aggressive snake than other species but with all things you do get individuals. and of course it depends on the circumstances

As they are cold blooded they tend to be more docile early morning and late evening. So you could quiet easily walk up and touch one at this point ( Always a risk)

they will be more aggressive
if backed in to a corner or threatened as already mentioned, If shedding or sloughing and their vision is impaired
Incubating eggs

with all snakes they are much more afraid of you then you are of them.

A snake will regurgitate its meal if it is attacked or threaten or its eyes were to big for its belly.

I wa sin the Kruger for the last 2 weeks and saw 4 snakes. I Mozambique crossing the road , 2 got away before i got a closer look. an dthe 4th i had to catch and put in the bush before anyone other than my self nearly stood on it.
Still trying to identify it so pics will be posted shortly

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Mar 27, 2007 2:45 pm 
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Here's my Python eating. Still very young, +/- 3 months.

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 Post subject: African rock Python
Unread postPosted: Thu Nov 08, 2007 4:45 pm 
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Location: Brakpan South Africa
I have never seen a python in the wild and only once at a snake park. Where is the best area in Kruger to see a python?


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