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 Post subject: Snake Warning
Unread postPosted: Wed Feb 16, 2005 6:48 am 
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Hi everyone,

Please be aware that several people and dogs were hit by moz spitting cobras and black mambas in the Mpumalanga area recently. It is very uncommon for so many snake encounters and the reason for this increase in snake bites were accounted by hot weather and quite a bit of rain.

It seems that the moz .spit. cobra especially are extremely agressive towards humans and animals.

Please be carefull when in the Parks especially Kruger and Wilderness (puffadders), from whom many people have reported an increase snake sightings.

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Feb 16, 2005 10:12 am 
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Puffadders being these beauties?
Picture made by Madach

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Feb 16, 2005 10:26 am 
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That's it Duques! :shock: Trouble with that one - you don't see it until you've either stepped over it or on it. It blends perfectly with its surroundings.

Anybody know exactly how dangerous the poison of the puffadder is? WTM, it seems you are knowledgeable about snakes, any idea?


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Feb 16, 2005 10:58 am 
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I can tell u that a puffadder is not a thing you want to cross your lightsaber with!

It's venom can kill up to 4 adults!

Luckily the venom works slowly but it is extremely venomous. It is cytotoxic and causes severe swelling, pain and necrosis. Which means that skin crafting will be your future if not treated quickly. It probably hits & kills more humans in Africa than any other snake as it lies deadstill until u step on it. Others normally flee.

You'll be lucky to disturb it following a hiss from the snake which you won't forget easily. It strikes quickly!!

It often swims, and lies on warm roads at night. It lives for up to 14 years if it has plenty of warmth and sunshine. Large amount of venom (100-350 mg); 100 mg is fatal in humans. The long fangs (12-18 mm) inject the venom deeply, and bites are usually inflicted on the lower leg.

Bites are common, but only a small proportion proves fatal; nonetheless, this snake causes over 60% of serious bites in the region, and is responsible for most of the fatalities. Death usually results from kidney failure and other complications caused by the extensive swelling.

It is essential to treat a victim of its bite for fluid loss, and
antivenom should be used in serious cases.

Read more about treatment : http://www-surgery.ucsd.edu/ent/DAVIDSO ... ietans.htm

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Thu Feb 17, 2005 8:41 am 
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On a hiking trail in the Park we came across a python track. It was about 30cm wide. Now that is a huge snake!!

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sun Mar 06, 2005 10:10 am 
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wildtuinman wrote:
Pythons in the Park can become very big!

I recall a incident next to the croc river where 2 park employees were patrolling and a pyhon grabbed one on the shoulder!!

Lucky for him his compatriot helped him free.


:shock: :shock: Shudder!!

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 Post subject: pythons
Unread postPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2005 6:17 pm 
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I saw a python cross the road near Muntshe in July one year :D when they are supposed to be hibernating, any comment

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sun Apr 03, 2005 6:56 pm 
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I've come across a couple of massive pythons close to the park. If you ever get the chance, allow a really large one to crawl across your shoulders (you'll need someone experienced to "guide" it). The most awesome shoulder muscle massage you'll ever experience :D

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sun Apr 03, 2005 6:58 pm 
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Oooh, Meg, did that to my hubby's dismay at Riverbend Croc Farm at Ramsgate in KZN! 8) Incredible feeling!!


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 Post subject: Re: pythons
Unread postPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2005 7:08 am 
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Bush Baptist wrote:
I saw a python cross the road near Muntshe in July one year :D when they are supposed to be hibernating, any comment

Hi and welcome Bush baptist,

I have seen more snakes in winter times in the Park than any other time. The Park does not become that cold for them to hibernate.

I have seen a 2-3m long black mamba near Shingwedzi main entrance gate last year June.

Hope this answers your question.

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2005 9:04 am 
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Hi,

Echoing what wtm says, think its only temperate areas like highveld where they will be dormant in winter. Lowveld temp in winter is lekker (=nice - to those from abroad) on those roads.

wj


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 Post subject: Puffy
Unread postPosted: Fri May 26, 2006 4:57 pm 
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Saw this puff adder on a night drive near Satara. The next morning, I did a morning walk, not far from where I saw him. Needless to say, I was pretty careful


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 Post subject: Re: Venom of mfezi ?
Unread postPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 8:30 am 
wildjohn wrote:
Hi Forumers,

Does anyone know why the mozambique spitting cobra (mfezi) has both cytotoxic and neurotoxic venom ?


Yours,
w


“Predominantly cytotoxic, causing serious local tissue damage that often requires skin grafts. Only slight neurotoxic symptoms, such as drowsiness, may occur and fatalities are rare. “ A Complete Guide to the snakes of Southern Africa, Johan Marais

I will leave this to the experts like Pilane or mfb to answer…I’m clueless as to why.
If I have to take a wild guess: Puffadders are part of the Moz. cobra’s diet, wonder if that hasn’t got anything to do with it. This is something I almost cannot believe…has anybody ever witness a Moz. cobra “catching” a puffadder?


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 10:51 am 
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As a comparative latecomer to the forums, I've only just read this thread...as we have virually always gone to Kruger in June/July, we have seen relatively few snakes, but over the past 2-3 years we have actually spotted quite a few. In the northern areas I discovered that one can quite frequently see snakes in the mid-morning on the "sunny" side of old termite mounds. Have spotted cobra, black mamba, a file snake, python, and a few "what the hell was that"s over the past few years.. :lol:

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 7:32 pm 
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like all the "spitters" ... the primary defence of the mfezi is to spit through it's modified fangs ... the cytotoxic venom is sprayed towards the eyes (although i had one that spat everywhere except at my face :lol: ) ... anyway ... the venom causes inflammation of the eyes and is extremely painful (caused by the cytotoxic component) and thus allowing the snake to make good it's escape

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