Skip to content

SANParks.org Forums

View unanswered posts | View active topics






Post new topic Reply to topic  Page 2 of 81
 [ 1214 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 81  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Mosquito bracelet
Unread postPosted: Mon May 16, 2005 7:50 am 
Offline
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
User avatar
Award: Birder of the Year (2013)
Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2004 10:27 am
Posts: 5380
Location: Chasing down the rarities
HS wrote:
Hi there, I have heard from someone that heard from someone about a bracelet that you wear and the the mozzies don't come near you. Does anyone know about this??? This person also said that he does not take malaria tabs when wearing this braclet??
It is here.

_________________
659
Latest Lifer(s): Slaty Egret, Ayres's Hawk-Eagle

Follow me as I bird on Twitter @wildtuinman


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon May 16, 2005 7:54 am 
Offline
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
User avatar
Award: Birder of the Year (2013)
Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2004 10:27 am
Posts: 5380
Location: Chasing down the rarities
This bracelet wob't prevent malaria, it is a way to keep mozzies off you. But if you do get bitten by a malaria mozzie this bracelet won't help.

Just something interesting: Malaria mozzies bites below the knees downwards. Maybe wear it around your ankles.

More on malaria.

_________________
659
Latest Lifer(s): Slaty Egret, Ayres's Hawk-Eagle

Follow me as I bird on Twitter @wildtuinman


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sun May 22, 2005 9:35 pm 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Fri May 20, 2005 8:48 am
Posts: 864
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
A very good friend of mine is a specialist physician specializing in occupational medicine, and his qualifications are longer than my arm. He is knighted by the queen (Order of St. Johns) for the work he has done in rural Africa. He has worked in Zambia, Swaziland, Malawi, Mozambique, etc. This guy knows what he is talking about. I once made the mistake of asking him about which malaria tablet is the best. After an hour explanation the abbreviated version is this:

1. Prophylactics mask symptoms.
2. You are going to get Malaria when bitten, regardless of the pills. It's quicker and easier to diagnose if you aren't using prophylactics.
3. Malaria takes about 2 weeks to take hold, but can be diagnosed within a few days of being bitten.
4. If you were in a Malaria area, and you feel the slightest bit sick, go for a blood test. In an hour you will know.
5. If treated early you will not even miss a day's work

So it's simple. You know you are going there, the day you get back go for a blood test. If you feel AT ALL flu'ish go and have a blood test done. It costs about R 160.00.

As far as kids and risk go, you as the parent need to decide, but you know your child, and if he/she looks sick you go to the doc and tell him where you've been. Otherwise take him/her for a quick blood test when you get home.

_________________
Operation "Duke" Member

Being African is not determined by race, but by what's in your heart


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon May 23, 2005 9:54 am 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 13, 2005 7:45 am
Posts: 66
Location: Jhb/Pta
I would like to offer some words of caution here regarding malaria.

i worked in a medical entomology department for several years so i have experience in the field.
DO NOT advise or encourage others to NOT take medication, regardless of whether or not you have a doctor/specialist friend who has given you information. your advice, if taken can result in the death of the person.
regarding masking of symptoms.... yes some of them can. however, in many cases, the VERY FIRST indication that a person has malaria is when they fall into a coma. then its getting a bit late to help them, depending on where they are.
malaria is a deadly disease. it is not a just so story that several million people die per year. malaria is deadly. so, take precautions, be WISE about it.
do not take remedies that are unproven - that do not have scientific evidence for their efficacy. you are risking your life.
not all doctors are aware of malaria, and think to check for it if you are ill. if you have been in a malaria area, taken drugs or not, INFORM your doctor, and demand the appropriate tests. if the doctor doesnt do the tests, go to another doctor.
if you cannot/will not take drugs, then behave appropriately:
- cover up, stay indoors at night, wash your feet (mozzies are attracted to smelly feet - the bacteria odours), use sprays, sleep under a net, throw away the ultrasonic buzzing insect repeller, etc.

summary - be WISE!!! be INFORMED!! and dont play with your life, your childrens lives, or other peoples lives.
malaria is a deadly disease! live appropriately.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon May 23, 2005 10:48 am 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 13, 2005 7:45 am
Posts: 66
Location: Jhb/Pta
howdy DB
1. There are resistant strains of malaria (its caused by little parasites (protozoans called Plasmodium carried by some mozzies) - these have been selected for resistant traits, ie. the chemicals in the drugs no longer affect them. There are semi defined areas of resistance, which is why you should use different drugs for different areas where you may travel - consult a travel clinic for the latest up to date information. Also, it is possible that you get such a high infection of the parasites, that the amount of drug you are taking is insufficient to overwhelm them, and you still come down with malaria. There are many thousands of people who were bitten by malaria carrying mozzies, picked up malaria, but never knew it - because the drugs cleared up the parasites before major clinical symptoms were picked up. You take the tablets to 1. entirely prevent an infection, and 2. to reduce the severity of an infection should you still get infected. The pills arent a miracle cure! they are just a help. same as you take multivitamins when under pressure at work or in winter - doesnt guarantee you dont get sick..... but helps you.

2. the malaria parasite goes through stages of its life cycle, both in humans and in the mozzies. see here. Depending on when you have the test done, in relation to the life cycle stage, the test MAY NOT show up as a positive. Therefore, if the symptoms continue, you need to be retested. The safe option is to keep retesting until something else is diagnosed, or the symptoms go away. There is also a strain that "hibernates" in the body, and you can get recurring cases, even though you havent been in a malaria area again. Also there is the sneaky "Airport Malaria" or "Suitcase Malaria" where someone comes down with malaria even though they havent been near a malaria area. This is due to infected Anopheles mosquitoes being transported out of the area, and they manage to infect someone before they die.

Hope this is of interest.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon May 23, 2005 10:55 am 
Offline
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 13, 2005 9:02 pm
Posts: 17136
Location: mind in SA, body in The Netherlands
david wrote:
I would like to offer some words of caution here regarding malaria.

throw away the ultrasonic buzzing insect repeller, etc.



David, do u mean that the ultrsonic dont work :?:
I use them at home just to keep the normal mozzies at bay

_________________
Submit your Images


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon May 23, 2005 11:05 am 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 13, 2005 7:45 am
Posts: 66
Location: Jhb/Pta
bert,
over the years, colleagues and i have been asked to test these things. we had never found one that actually works to repell insects. most we found did highly irritate dogs and horses, as the sound emitted was within their hearing ranges.
if you want to use sound to get rid of them turn the bass on the HiFi reeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeally high. The sound wave should bounce them right out the room. :lol: your neighbours may want to bounce your right out your neighbourhood though...

insects don't hear so well... they "smell" much better, so use chemicals .... or more environmentally friendly - physical barriers, i have found a fly swatter ends a mosquitoes interest pretty quickly.... and its good for the heart.... all the leaping around like a klipspringer trying to get at the mozzies as they whine their way around the room. :lol:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon May 23, 2005 11:45 am 
Offline
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 1:38 pm
Posts: 1936
DinkyBird wrote:
Thanks for that David - I have two questions:

1. I read on the insert of the malaria tabs I took that one can still get malaria if you take the tabs...how does this happen and if that is the case, why take the tabs? In other words, how does taking anti-malaria medication actually help/prevent?

2. If one is infected by a bite does the malaria show up in a blood test immediatly? If one has a blood test that is neg does that mean that there is no way you could have malaria until you are at risk again?


DB, I will not give myself out as knowledgeable on malaria parasites as my focus was previously on worm parasites. But regarding to your first question it must be remembered that as with so many other parasites and bacteria, these organisms have developed a certain measure of resistance to the drugs normally used to kill them. What you read on the insert of the tablets meant that depending on the malaria parasite present in the mosquito that bites you, that parasite might be resistant against the drug you took and therefore the drug will be ineffective in protecting against the parasite. Your doctor or travel clinic should have the latest information on drug resistance available to them to help you choose the most effective prophylaxis to use.

Here is some information taken from the website of the CDC Division of Parasitic Diseases that might help to answer your other questions.

Malaria Incubation Period
Following the infective bite by the Anopheles mosquito, a period of time (the "incubation period") goes by before the first symptoms appear. The incubation period in most cases varies from 7 to 30 days. The shorter periods are observed most frequently with P. falciparum and the longer ones with P. malariae.
Antimalarial drugs taken for prophylaxis by travellers can delay the appearance of malaria symptoms by weeks or months, long after the traveller has left the malaria-endemic area. (This can happen particularly with P. vivax and P. ovale, both of which can produce dormant liver stage parasites; the liver stages may reactivate and cause disease months after the infective mosquito bite.)
Such long delays between exposure and development of symptoms can result in misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis because of reduced clinical suspicion by the health-care provider. Returned travellers should always remind their health-care providers of any travel in malaria-risk areas during the past 12 months.

The following CDC links may also answer questions or give more info for those interested
Frequently Asked Questions about Malaria
Schema of the Life Cycle of Malaria
Follow this link to more CDC information on Malaria
Malaria Department of the World Health Organization
SAA Netcare Travel Clinics: Malaria

_________________
"The measure of life is not its duration but its donation." - Peter Marshall
www.flickr.com/groups/birdssa


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon May 23, 2005 12:08 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 13, 2005 7:45 am
Posts: 66
Location: Jhb/Pta
DinkyBird wrote:
Guys (David & Loams) - are we looking at the same elephant in your avatars :?:

Do you agree SA has made good strides towards controlling malaria?


fraid not ..... or probly not... re the ellie.

SA has done very well with regard to controlling malaria. there was a major oopsie in the late '90's where the authorities heeded to the greenies pressure and stopped using DDT to spray houses. This resulted in a 1000 fold increase in malaria cases, and more than a few deaths. This was due to the mosquitoes resistance to the insecticide they started using - fipronil. Way back in the dust of time, Dieldrin had been used to control mozzies, and the Dieldrin resistant strains had been selected for. They were then forced to switch to DDT. However, only dieldrin resistant strains remained (in KZN). When they switched to Fipronil (a totally different class of insecticide) the malaria incidences went through the roof. It only later when a lab tested a laboratory colony of mozzies from there, with fipronil that it was figured out. The mode of action (getting a wee bit scientific here) was exactly the same as for dieldrin (acetylcholine related)... net result...the mozzies were unaffected, popualtions soared, malaria incidence went up, people died.

but, now that its been fgured out, we have low incidence rates. SA has practically no malaria problems compared to other african countries!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Malaria in Kruger and other Health Issues
Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2005 10:15 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jun 21, 2005 3:32 pm
Posts: 4
Location: North London
Me again folks! (going 16th July -getting closer!)
I've been reading past posts on this subject and found lots of useful info but I still have some queries for you! I am finding some of the Info quite worrying so I hope you will bear with my questions!

Many people are talking about mosquito coils-what are they ?How are they used ? Where do you buy them from ?

Are the huts screen doors an windows sufficient to keep Mossies out at night or should we consider taking our own mossie nets ?

Would it be best to leave the shorts and tee shirts at home and wear long sleeve shirts and trousers all day?

We will buy 50% DEET spray to use but what about natural Citronella repellants-would it be a good idea to spray this on clothes and bedding?

Any other tips to keep them at bay?

We shall be taking the prescribed tablets from our doctor of course but It seems that if we are bitten we could still spend up to a year worrying that any time we feel ill it is Malaria! So would like to avoid this anxiety as much as possible!

Yes you guessed it I am a born worrier!!

Thank everyone!

Jan


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2005 10:30 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jan 16, 2005 3:19 pm
Posts: 8145
Location: Portsmouth, England
Firstly its the middle of the South African winter when mozzie activity is at it lowest. Having said that you do need to take precautions.

Coils are just that - coils of insect repellant that you burn. Same principal that the electric repellants work on only you don't need a plug.

Yes the screens on the hut doors are enough to keep out creepy crawlies. You don't need mozzie nets in the bungalows, Someone here suggested spraying with insect repellant when you first go into the accommodation - its worth doing, especially in the shower/WC areas. The just burn a coil when you are in. Avoid opening the door after dark if the light is on. Basic precautions that you'd use to keep out insects in the Med.

Is it worth wearing trousers and shirts all day - no you'll bake, especially in the car. Just cover up at twilight and use a spray of repellant around the ankles.

If you spend too much time worrying over this then you won't be able to relax and enjoy the holiday.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2005 7:42 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2004 5:54 pm
Posts: 43480
Location: Somerset West, Cape Town
Hi Jan,

(from one worrier to another :lol: )

Saraf has answered your questions - I am just going to add my point of view.

We visit Kruger at different times during the year - mozzies are about least during winter. We camp so end up sitting outside most of the time - and I suggest that you spray yourselves (or use the cream) with Peaceful Sleep or Tabard as soon as you rise in the mornings and top up at about 4pm each day (and after you have showered).
Burn citronella candles and the coils you mentioned as soon as you return from your drives in the evenings. I am not a fan of spraying with poison as this effects the whole food chain and other innocent bugs get killed.
I have been bitten by mozzies every time I have visited Kruger in the summer months and never caught malaria.
Not all the mozzies there carry Malaria. Just be aware.
One cannot downplay the threat of catching malaria but you are going at a very low risk time. You might not even see a single mozzie!
The Kruger Park shops are well stocked with every anti mozzie spray and coil etc you might need.

Do not leave your shorts and t-shirts at home!! As Saraf says - you will boil. If you are worried about being bitten rather wear socks that cover you ankles.

_________________
Sawubona
Dalene


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2005 9:11 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2005 5:22 pm
Posts: 135
Location: Born and Bred in SA, Living in NZ
Hi Jan,

If you are going during winter I would suggest only taking precautionary measures to keep the mozzies at bay as the side effects of anti-malarials vary and could end up putting a dampner on your trip.

With that said I would suggest burning a coil (if you don't mind the vapours or alternatively using an electrical mosqitoe repelant. In the subject of clothes, I must disagree with saraf (Sorry) I would always suggest wearing a pair of long trousers, preferably made of light weight material and in a khaki or light beige colour, as most rental cars are airconditioned (Check on this first). The added advantage is that it prevents sun burn when travelling in the car. T-Shirts should be fine but have a button up with long sleevs for later in the evening (specially once the sun starts to set).

Colours are important, a friend of mine is busy doing a study on how insects are attracted to different colours. So far it seems the brighter whites and colourful reds and yellows seem to attract a variety of insects (up to and including mozzies). The earthy tones (browns and greens) seem to have the least effect on insects.

I would also suggest (if possible) getting a mozzie repellant clothes wash and treating your clothes before coming through to the park. I'm not sure if they are available overseas but they should be. The one I find most effective uses Peripal, a general insect repellant.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Jun 28, 2005 10:10 am 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2005 6:21 pm
Posts: 68
Location: In Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
wildtuinman wrote:
wildtuinman wrote:
I have noticed that mozzies are very well present in most of the bathrooms. Be carefull when you are in the bathroom after a shower etc. It is a very possible threat to get bitten while in there.


Don't fool yourself by thinking that there aren't any mozzies around in the winter. Just check out the communal bathrooms to be convinced otherwise. BTW, my SO picked up malaria at the end of May 2003.



Don't intend to fool them - just saying no need to worry to the degree she does. Anyway, malaria tablets/bug spray/coils or not it can still happen, so just enjoy it and use common sense before going anywhere.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: children, malaria risk and Kruger Park in Winter
Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2005 6:34 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2004 5:54 pm
Posts: 43480
Location: Somerset West, Cape Town
cwolfsen wrote:
We went to Kruger Park about 10 yrs ago in Winter and I cannot remember seeing any mosquito's.
We want to go to SA next year and also to KP. We plan on going in August/September with our kids of then 2 and 4 yrs old. I prefer not to give them antimalaria drugs.

I live on the coast in SA and it is mid winter here especially today and we have had very little rain. I have just see a mosquito fly past me. OK not a malaria moz, but one none the less.

Quote:
My questions are:
- is it correct to assume the malaria risk and mosquito prevalence is quite low in August/Sept
- does the fixed accomodation in KP have mosquito screens or do we need to take mosquito nets

All buildings in KNP have screens on the windows and the doors.

Quote:
- from my own experience 10 yrs ago I would figure travelling with kids is pretty safe in KP. Am I right?

Do you mean safe from criminal elements? If so, yes. KNP is very safe. Just remember to keep car windows closed around baboons and monkeys. Also not to leave your children unattended especially with food - baboons and monkeys will try and steal the food from them.

_________________
Sawubona
Dalene


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 1214 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 81  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group

Webcams Highlights

Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Submitted by ritad at 20:49:48 Submitted by Jamiefick at 20:38:19 Submitted by Lorinda at 18:24:35 Submitted by mitzi 14 at 14:59:46