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Unread postPosted: Thu Jul 07, 2005 1:39 pm 
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Junior Virtual Ranger
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Just to add to the citronella tip. :wink: Get the real thing in it's pure form at any chemist and mix you own - add to cream, oil, etc.


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 Post subject: tips
Unread postPosted: Thu Jul 07, 2005 1:42 pm 
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We all know how difficult predators are to see at the best of times. However our feathered friends always have a good view of them. While driving, listen out for the alarm calls of birds, expecially francolins and guineafowls. Careful searching will often then expose a predator lurking around.

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Unread postPosted: Thu Jul 07, 2005 1:42 pm 
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wildtuinman wrote:
Save the camp's duty manager's cellno on your cell when checking in.

When rhinos get difficult with you just clap your hand on the roof or side of your car to id yourself as a non-rhino.

And if it is rhino-attacking-non-rhino-day you phone the number of the duty manager you saved to your cellphone?

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Unread postPosted: Sat Jul 09, 2005 5:28 pm 
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In term of predators: primates are also good indicators of activity. We once saw a whole tree full of frozen baboons.

Never, never ever think primates cannot get into your tent, caravan, bungalo ect. If you have any food, lock it in a space that is too difficult for our best Gauteng burglar. We once lost all our maleria medication and found our concentrated energade(1.5 litres) spread all over our bedding in a "safe camp".

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Unread postPosted: Sat Jul 09, 2005 7:58 pm 
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Following on what MM has posted - don't think that monkeys or baboons won't get into your car either. We came across a child who had been left in the car with the windows open and food on the seat of the car, while her parents ran into the loo at a picnic site. Monkeys were in the car in a tic and frightened the poor child half to death!

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Unread postPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2005 4:42 pm 
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It is useful to have a rechargeable spotlight or one that plugs into the cigarette lighter in the car. If you leave camp while it is still dark (its virtually impossible to see anything that is not on the actual road) it can be used in the same way that you would on a night drive. We have had some excellent sightings as a result.

:arrow: REMEMBER: ONCE YOU HAVE SPOTTED THE ANIMAL, MOVE THE BEAM OF LIGHT AWAY FROM ITS EYES. (I have often seen people on night drives focus entirely on the face of the animal, even within very close range. :evil: )

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Unread postPosted: Sat Sep 30, 2006 12:13 pm 
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If you have very young children, take along music, stories and a discman of sorts. Their attenention span is poor and it will make a difference to everyone's enjoyment of the Park.

No they do not want to sit at a waterhole, or stare for many moments at what you might believe was a movement in a bush. :cry: :cry:

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 Post subject: Tips
Unread postPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2007 7:00 pm 
We're all learning here!

Use a 'cuzi (only name I know) which is a rubberised hand-held sheath for cold cans or 340ml bottles of liquid refreshment.

Not that I've tried drinking in the Park, just heard from other visitors.

Coleman is by far the best version, available at most camping outlets or even supermarkets.

Keeps a beer cold for up to 45 minutes, if you need that long!


Last edited by Richprins on Wed Jun 06, 2007 7:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Unread postPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2007 11:20 am 
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Following MM & DB's advice re primates. Probably obvious but if you have an outside kitchen either turn fridge to wall or push table tight against it. (Even when you're there! Have happy memories of SO straight out of shower in towel chasing baboons mid afternoon :roll: I was laughing too much to help :redface: ) Many fridges don't have the child proof clips on. Also don't trust bolted cupboards, the baboons love opening these! In Skukuza we had a large metal cupboard with huge bolts and the baboons had a field day with our fruit. :twisted:

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Unread postPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2007 11:43 am 
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Quote:
Also don't trust bolted cupboards, the baboons love opening these!


Vervets and baboons can also open tents! Take along a small padlocklock that will fit through the eyelets where the two zips come together (that is if your tent has two zips that meet).

Having said that take note if this:
Once while staying in one of the NW Parks we had our nylon tent ripped open by vervets, even though there was no food in the tent at all. They obviously did not know how to undo the zip so tried to gain access by other means. We had to cut our stay short as we would have rained wet! We also had to buy a new tent :x.

I still plan to buy a canvas tent. Although much more expensive, they are a lot more water proof than nylon tents and of course monkey's cannot (or should not be able to) rip the material. As a student I stayed in a canvas dome tent for two years and it was a lot more comfortable (and warmer) than a nylon tent.

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Unread postPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:41 pm 
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Bump!!

Anyone got some hints to add here?

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A roaring lion does not catch any prey - African Proverb


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Unread postPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 10:56 pm 
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DinkyBird wrote:
Bump!!

Anyone got some hints to add here?

Never think you know best. Always ask those around you for good hints. They know best. Wouldnt you agree? :P

Well i guess i have some. When you are at Afsaal never underestimate those 'innocent' yellowbilled hornbills as they snapped our meat off the braai! :evil: Also dont walk around at night in Lower Sabie because after your little walk along the fence you will come back with huge spiders crawling in your hair and webs by your eyebrows. Oh, and most importantly water is the compulsory in KNP because as you all know once opening a can of coke 5 or 6 bees sneak into it without you knowing and then theres little things stinging you in your larynx. Or you could just use a serviette to block the enterance of the can. And a little tip during the mornings take the least popular and busy roads as they prove most successful (for me) even with their bad reputations. Hope you enjoyed my 2cents!


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Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 06, 2008 8:10 am 
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To Add to MWD's Afsaal hint. Sit under the thatched lapas. The trees look so tempting and cool, BUT there are so many birds in them that you are highlt likely to be pooped on! :twisted:

We have found it useful to stop in the middle of nowhere and have coffee cooldrinks and snacks and just listen to the bush. Sometimes you see and hear surprising things, even when you seem to be on an unproductive road

BTW, Thanks DB for "bumping " this thread. I had not found it and it has some useful info 8)

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Unread postPosted: Sat Aug 09, 2008 8:37 am 
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Always take spare batteries for your torch. I found myself stumbling around in the pitch dark in Maroela with absolutely no lighting.

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 Post subject: Re: Helpful Hints
Unread postPosted: Mon Sep 22, 2008 2:40 pm 
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Not only spare batteries, but spare globes for the torch as well.

When using electric lighting around your camp site, use a yellow globe as it attracts far less insects to your sight.

I also carry spare jets for all my gas appliances (Skottle, light etc) as well as spare mantles for the gas lights.

Handy to have the right size spanner for changing the gas jets which happens to be an 11mm spanner. (A free state micrometer will also do the job.)

Keep the primates out of your tent by not keeping food in it. I have had more than one or two laughs at people who spend ages trying to make sure their caravan side tents are secure, only to find that the monkeys and baboons can still get in. Primates can very easily tear the mosquito meshing or even the canvas.

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Conservation is not an option.
It's imperative.

Leave KNP alone. Go build a hotel someplace else. Reserves are for the preservation of wildlife.

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