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 Post subject: Re: LEST WE FORGET
Unread postPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 10:28 am 
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Gus Adendorff Part 12

Poaching was a huge problem in the Pretoriuskop area. Poachers had many illegal firearms ranging from .22 calibre to any type of Blunderbuss, some of them home made, possibly more dangerous in the close vicinity than at the open end of the muzzle.

Poachers were of any age from youngsters to old men, many of them had spent many terms in prison, and this just did not seem to have any effect on them.

A few sentences passed at the SKUKUZA Court were:
Hunting in the Park R60.00 or 60 days imprisonment.
Entering the Park without permission : R30.00 or 30 days imprisonment.
Killing a Warthog R130.00 or 130 days imprisonment.
Entering the Park with four donkeys R R100.00 or 100 days imprisonment.
Killing a Sable antelope R400.00 or 400 days imprisonment.
Being in possession of firearms: 6 months imprisonment without option of a fine.

Once four Game Guards from Malelane were charged with catching a Lion in a wire snare, the organs were sold to Witchdoctors as muti – this was a great disappointment to Gus. The Court at Skukuza found all four guilty, two were fined R650.00 or 650 days imprisonment and the other two R500.00 or 500 days imprisonment.

On one occasion six men entered the Park near Numbi Hill, they shot a Kudu with a .303 rifle with the aid of a shooting lamp. The meat was carted home, the Police arrived to late to do much, the SKUKUZA Police seemed reluctant, not giving up Gus contacted the Kiepersol Police who immediately came out.

The meat was found in a hut not far from the boundary. A woman admitted that her husband had shot the Kudu, but that he had already returned to the Park – where he was employed as a labourer on the roads at SKUKUZA, Gus obtained his name and contacted Hannes Kloppers the Nature Conservators Clerk.

Gus was informed that the culprit was then working on the road between Phalaborwa Gate and Letaba Camp. Dirk Ackerman the then Ranger at Letaba was informed about the happenings and asked to make the required arrest.

The culprit was trialled at White River and fined R300.00 or 300 days imprisonment for killing a Kudu and 6 months imprisonment for being in possession of a firearm.

One morning Gus was woken up and told that one of the Game Guards – Jackson, had been killed in the area adjoining the Park by four men, he had been clubbed to death.

The two Game Guards went shopping in the area, returning to the Park they were confronted them telling them that the area was “out of bounds” to Game Guards, they were made out to be traitors to their race and responsible for the arrest of many of their fellow brethren for poaching. They then tackled the two, one managed to escape and fled.

The Kiepersol Police were again contacted who immediately came out to investigate.


Dave Stegman the Public Relations Officer gave wildlife talks and his film shows were always well attended by the eager tourists. Very often private discussions were held after the evening’s activities were scheduled to have come to an end. One evening he played Lion roars during the show, which were soon answered by a pride outside the Camp – causing great excitement to the tourists. This was Gus’ first experience to the reaction of Lions to taped calls.

Lions often left the Park, one morning Judas (the most photographed employee of the KRUGER NATIONAL PARK); the gate attendant at Numbi Gate showed Gus the pugmarks where Lions had crept through the gate, some hair was still sticking to the wires, they were seen in the head lights of an approaching vehicle – six of them – four were seen to return, it was reckoned that the others followed suit.

The year 1965 was very dry many pools and fountains had dried, Helfas told Gus that this was the first time in his life that he had seen the pools in the Fayi Stream and the Folly Dam dry. Large game concentrations of game were accumulating at the Nsigazi area which was close to the boundary where poaching activities were a real threat. Boreholes were sunk in dams were built later which changed the situation during the dry periods.

A borehole delivering 1363 litres per hour was reckoned successful and a windmill would be erected.

One morning at 02:00 Mr. Aucamp the Tourist Officer at Numbi Gate, called Gus and informed him that the two Game Guards at the Nkuweni picket had shot a man in self defence.

Charlie Nkuna told Gus that he was woken up by the sound of a gun shot. He immediately set off to investigate. He saw a bright light moving around in the direction of Numbi hill.

Charlie returned to the picket and woke up his fellow Game Guard, the two set off and when close enough they shouted to the culprits to hand themselves over. They were fired at, they returned fire as their lives were in danger.

After a while the shooting stopped and then they heard someone shouting in Afrikaans that the person had been shot and is dying. The two got a fright and ran for help, to Mr. Aucamp who called Gus.

The Kiepersol Police were again called, on arrival at the scene there was no sign of a corpse or a wounded man, however many empty cartridge cases were found. As it was dark it was decided to continue the search in daylight. Returning to Kiepersol the Police saw a man running along the tar road, he looked suspicious and the Police stopped and questioned him. He suspected that the Police knew everything and he spilled the beans – telling them everything. Giving full details of the six members of the poaching party. The calling that someone had been shot was a hoax by the white member of the group. As a result from the information obtained all were rounded up.

The man that had done the shooting was charged for attempted murder which could not be proved, however he was found guilty of being in possession of an unlicensed firearm and sentenced to one year imprisonment and for poaching with a firearm for which he was fined R200.00 or 200 days imprisonment. One was fined R100.00 or 100 days and the others sentenced to six lashes each.

While out on patrol in the Mtsawo stream area two Game Guards came across a poaching party, they arrested two while the others escaped. At the poachers’ camp they found they found twenty four Impala and an Ant bear, all killed by wire snares. A further about twenty snares were found along the game paths in the surrounding bush. One of the arrested poachers was an old hand and had served many terms in jail, this did not seem to have any affect on him.

The Kiepersol Police again assisted and two of the escapees were arrested, the third one was arrested at his home. They were in total fined R560.00 or 560 days.

_________________
I participate because I care - CUSTOS NATURAE
No to Hotels in and commercialization of our National Parks.
No to Legalized Rhino and Lion trade.
Done 144 visits to National Parks.
What a wonderful privilege.


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 Post subject: Re: LEST WE FORGET
Unread postPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 5:25 pm 
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Gus Adendorff Part 13

The Game Guards from the Mahlabantu picket once arrested six women and four men for hunting in the KRUGER PARK. They had two .303 calibre rifles in their possession, they had shot two Sable Antelope and hired the women to carry the meat, the one rifle had S.A.A.F. stamped on the but – indicating it was of military stock the South African Air Force. During the follow up twenty-three people were arrested and jailed for poaching. The sentence for the two Sable was R800.00 or 780 days in the Government hotel. For hunting in the Park with firearms - a further six months in the hotel.

The Game Guards while out on patrol intercepted a group of poachers, but the culprits escaped. A dead Leopard and a dead Steenbok which had been shot by the poachers were found were they were first encountered, as well as a loaded shotgun . . . .

The rain season of 1966 brought good news and all again returned to being lively and wonderful, only the predators now found it difficult as the game scattered as water again was in abundance.

Oom Gus mentioned that once he observed a female Baboon who displayed motherly love of the highest order. She was carrying and caring for her baby who was dead for quite some time as it was just a little skeleton covered by a dry skin, she would place the little corpse on the ground while she was eating and every time she moved away, she would carefully pick it up and take it with her.

While inspecting some old redundant water tanks (the remains are still visible today) on top of the Shabeni Hill which supplied water to the Pretoriuskop Rest Camp, he found the skeletons of nine dead Baboons in the reservoirs. They must have playing on the walls and fallen in and died a death of thirst, heat exhaustion and starvation. Gus then placed a large tree stump in each of the reservoirs as escape route for some unsuspecting animals.


Oom Pieter Kritzinger was relieving as tourist officer at the Numbi Gate, reported that one morning on his way from Pretoriuskop to Numbi he found a Leopard balanced on a high up overhanging branch of a tree with two Lions lower down in the fork of the same tree about three metres above ground level. Once the audience arrived the Lions jumped down and disappeared into the bush . . . . Just imagine the story he told the tourists. . . . . . and their anxiety to get to the spot.

Oom Gus very seldomnly had problems with misbehaving tourists. He recalled that once a group was camping in Pretoriuskop. An argument between two of the men developed into a fight which in turn developed into a free for all. The Ranger was called to sort out the mess. He found the whole lot in a complete state of drunkenness and promptly cancelled their permit and escorted them out of the Park.

One day while out on patrol, Gus and Helfas came across an old wagon trail which even Helfas was not aware about, he remembered that once an old man came to Harry Wolhuter and asked for permission to go and walk along the wagon trail which he accompanied while still a young boy. Permission was given but it could not be found. Gus visualized as he walked along the track – sitting on the wagon, having a chat with those old pioneers, the old-timers. This track was not far from the Nyarini Dam. . . . . .

Two Game Guards Moses and Sandriver once went to visit friends on the neighbouring farm Belfast; they had to cross the Sabie River, which was flowing strongly and slightly discoloured. Sandriver was hesitant in crossing the River but Moses was quite adamant. As he entered the water a Crocodile caught him by the leg, he yelled for help, Sandriver rushed into the water, grabbing Moses by one arm while holding onto the reeds with his other hand. The reeds soon gave way and Sandriver grabbed onto a log floating by while still holding onto Moses, fortunately the Crocodile let go. The two struggled to the bank of the Sabie.

Sandriver stopped a tourist car which was passing, the occupants advised SKUKUZA and soon help was on its way, Moses recovered in hospital but he was crippled for life. He was extremely lucky as Crocodiles have great strength and do not easily let go of their prey . . . .

Helfas and Gus one morning approached a water hole they noticed a herd of Buffalo – all staring in the same direction, some bulls were kicking up dust and making low bellows. All of a sudden a Buffalo came tearing out of the bush, with a Lion hanging onto its buttocks with the claws firmly imbedded and a second Lion with its fangs clinging to its nose while being dragged along, a third Lion ran up and fastened its fangs around the throat of the Buffalo. This brought the lot to a standstill and soon the Buffalo collapsed.

After three years at Pretoriuskop the Adendorff family moved to Letaba. Gus was sad to leave his friend Sergeant Helfas Nkuna behind.

_________________
I participate because I care - CUSTOS NATURAE
No to Hotels in and commercialization of our National Parks.
No to Legalized Rhino and Lion trade.
Done 144 visits to National Parks.
What a wonderful privilege.


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 Post subject: Re: LEST WE FORGET
Unread postPosted: Wed Mar 31, 2010 12:18 pm 
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Gus Adendorff Part 14


Gus knew the Letaba area quite well as it was included into his area during his tenure at Punda Maria as District Ranger of the northern area. It was huge area which had now been divided into Letaba, Klipkoppies and Mahlangene.

Klipkoppies bordered Mozambique; it was in a very arid part of the Park. The Rangers quarters were not very comfortable; the bit of water available was not fit for human consumption, the garden on the rocky surface consisted of aloes and a few succulents.

Klipkoppies was completely cut of from the rest of the Park while the Letaba River was in flood; fortunately this Rangers Post was abandoned after a few years and moved to the Shipandane Area where some old ruins are still visible indicating much earlier habitation.

The view from Shipandane was wonderful, it covers a vast area, today it is called Mooiplaas, the name given the spot by old hunters who must have enjoyed camping there – now all will know where it is.

Two of the hunters who visited the area were Bowker – after who Bowkers Kop is named and Barber after who Barberton is named.

The Mahlangene Section was later made known by Kobie Kruger, wife of Kobus, it was very isolated, the nearest civilised area is Phalaborwa some twenty two kilometres away. Anyone visiting this Post had to ferry across the river. The Hippos soon became used to the passing rowing boats, Crocodiles were plentiful and dogs had to be watched very carefully.

The Adendorffs were now in the Elephant area. Vast breeding herds operated here.

One morning Gus noticed the Lionesses alongside a pool in the Letaba, below where the Engelhard Dam is now situated. The two woke up hen Gus arrived and they swam through the pool untouched by the many Crocodiles, Gus was quite surprised at the speed with which they crossed the pool, he then realised what strong swimmers Lions really are.

The Rangers quarters at Letaba were quite comfortable unlike that which was occupied by Henry Ledeboer, his home was now used as the storage shed . . . . It was also here that I met Oom Gus the first time – August 1967, on our very first visit to this wonderful place.

While at Letaba, Gus was invited by Andries Cornelius of the SABC to join their group on their trip to Mozambique to where the van Rensburg trek had been massacred in 1836. Unfortunately they got as far as Pafuri – the Great Limpopo was flowing too strongly and they had to return home – vey disappointed.

Oom Gus recalls a trip with Fanie Botha mentioned in my first post, who was the Klipkoppies Ranger, the called Mala Mala, the two of them set off to Massingiri the Portuguese outpost with a few shops, on the banks of the Olifants some 48 kilometres further downstream from the Park boundary, where they discussed poaching with the Chef de Poste, they were very well entertained and parted in a jovial manner and arrived at Klipkoppies in the best of spirits.

Oom Gus mentioned that they had excellent neighbours in the Phalaborwa Mining Company, who assisted in any way possible, the Manager Mr. Cowy was dedicated to wildlife and very often help was made available while putting out veld fires, all surplus water was supplied to the Park, they assisted with the diverting of the Tsutsi Stream, which was originally dry for most of the year and is now regarded as perennial, offering water to the game.

Two Game Guards were patrolling and noticed vultures hovering nearby; they went to investigate and came across two Lions eating a Sable Bull it only had one horn, the other appeared to have broken off long ago, maybe in combat with another bull. The area was badly trampled, Mopani branches were all broken, a dead Lion was found with a hole behind the shoulder - where the horn of the bull had penetrated the heart.

Gus visited the area where the proud bull had put up such a gallant fight. He left the area quite nostalgic as he again realised that these magnificent Black and White specimens with their beautifully backwards swept horns are formidable, proud animals who are so famous for their courage, certainly demand respect.

One day Gus and Game Guard Piet Hlongo cam across a live Elephant which was stuck in the mud at the confluence of the Nghotsha Stream and the Olifants River quite close to Balule, on investigation Gus found that the poor beast had sunk so far into the mud that only the top part of the shoulder and head were free. Gus considered digging it out with the aid of the D7 Bulldozer which was working close by building the road. He contacted the Nature Conservator and explained the situation and the rescue plan. He was told to rather not as the likelihood of the animal being injured by the Bulldozer and the hauling out of the mud, with all the stress induced by its ordeal it and dying after all this was a great possibility, it was suggested that Gus ends its suffering. Gus was extremely sad when he pulled the trigger . . . . and even more saddened when it died with a sigh . . . . .

One evening Gus was awakened by a rumpus outside, he went outside and shining his torch saw eight Lions, A Black maned male, four Lionesses and three half grown cubs, all feeding on a Waterbuck which they had chased into diamond mesh fence around the Rangers quarters making a huge dent into it.

Game Guards Piet Hlongo and Carlos Chauke once cam back from patrol quite grey in the face. They reported that while on patrol, they heard an Elephant trumpeting, the bush was breaking in their direction and two large Lions appeared closely followed by what seemed to be an angry trumpeting Elephant. The two guards just had time to escape behind a thick tree and watch the three animals disappear into the bush.

An injured Elephant was reported to Gus by some tourists coming from Olifants to Letaba. The Ranger went to investigate, the animal was walking on three legs, the fourth was badly swollen, with puss suppurating from a huge wound, it seemed to be in great agony. After a while Gus realized that the animal would not recover and decided to end the suffering. Gus then found that the Bull must have been in a fight as there was a huge hole in the leg; gangrene had already set into the reeking wound. The carcass was fed on by the local Lion pride for three days and thereafter by Hyaenas and other scavengers, the on looking tourists also did not seem to mind the awkward stench.

Some local inhabitants living on the outskirts of the Park at Malopene informed the Phalaborwa Police that one of their little boys aged three, went missing. They were afraid that he may have entered the Park . . . .

The Police contacted Gus; instructions were immediately given to all available to start a search. The spoor was found, he had entered the Park. With the assistance of the Police and their dog, Gus, fellow Ranger Dawid Roux and four Game Guards they followed the small hardly visible tracks, it was extremely hot and the dog was of little use. It kept on looking for shade and time was running out, fortunately the Game Guards were excellent trackers.

The area had a large Elephant and Buffalo population as well as Lions and Leopards and Hyaena who were well represented.

The search had to be abandoned when night fell.

At the crack of dawn the following day, the party set out, accompanied by the anxious father. They came across Elephant spoor with some dirty water in, with signs that the little boy must have drunk from. Encouraged they continued. That afternoon the trail was lost completely . . . . The fresh Lion spoor on top of the little tracks causing some horrible thoughts. The father said that he had great faith in the Lord and the child would be safe. Darkness fell and they could not continue. The Third day was spent searching all over - all was fruitless, however the father still kept his faith.

On the forth day Blackie Zwarts the Rondalia representative at Letaba was on his way to Phalaborwa, in the distance he noticed a small little figure alongside the road underneath a Marula tree. Miraculously it was the little boy, eating ripe Marula fruit.

Blackie picked him up and took him to the Phalaborwa Police Station. A doctor was summoned to do a check up. He was in excellent condition. The doctor prescribed a mixture of Coca Cola and milk for two days after which he could return to his normal diet.

The faith of the father had been justified; the rejoicing was great and the tears uncontrollable.

_________________
I participate because I care - CUSTOS NATURAE
No to Hotels in and commercialization of our National Parks.
No to Legalized Rhino and Lion trade.
Done 144 visits to National Parks.
What a wonderful privilege.


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 Post subject: Re: LEST WE FORGET
Unread postPosted: Thu Apr 01, 2010 5:39 pm 
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Gus Adendorff Part 15.

While doing a game count at Tshokwane in the Lipape area, Gus found the carcass of a fully grown Giraffe bull trapped in the game fence. Even with assistance it could not be removed, the hind quarters were removed and taken to the camp, where they were chained hanging from a thick branch, Gus was to play of his recorded Lion calls through an amplifier and a loud speaker as entertainment for the staff who were in their vehicles, parked about fifty metres away.

Gus played the roars and almost instantly they were answered and very soon two Lions appeared. They attempted to pull the bait down, fortunately the chain held, forcing them to tear off chunks.

It was a very cold night and one of the onlookers decided to head off home and – his vehicle would not start – a few brave men got out and push started the vehicle, as it drove off the brave ones became visible to the Lions and ran off to the safety of their vehicles, the Lions just looking on at the strange sight . . . .

Once Gus came across five Lions lying in the shade of a Mopani tree at the Shivulane watering place, not very far was a Sable Bull on high alert facing them.

One of the Lions got up and charged the Bull, the Bull swept the air with its mighty horns parallel to the ground, and turned that tables. The Lion turned around and fled. The pluck shown by this noble animal was remarkable.

While on a patrol north of the Letaba River, Gus found a male Lion in a pathetic condition, Gus saw that the reason for the condition was a wire cable that was wedged between its jaws and the back of the head, it was pulled so taut, making it impossible for the animal to swallow, drugging the animal would be futile. Gus realised that the kindest thing would be to relieve him of his agony as soon as possible. He probably came from Mozambique in that condition . . .

During the 1968 drought the Letaba dried up with just a few remaining pools which were occupied with Hippo, causing the quality of the water to deteriorate rapidly. The animals stood side by side, upright with exposed skin, even in the deepest pools. Gus counted eighty three Hippos which they shared with numerous Crocodiles in one of the larger pools. The bulls fought as a result of the overcrowding, many of them had deep wounds. Crocodiles were feeding on the edges – off dead Hippos, they would bite onto a dead animal and then propel their bodies, the propelling action tearing off chunks of meat . . . .

Many of the poor conditioned animals died during the following November 1968, which was exceptionally cold accompanied by rain.

The Game Guards at Malopene camp on the western boundary reported a rogue Elephant that chased everything in sight.

Gus went to investigate, they soon found the animal and for future safety sake, Gus decided to destroy the rogue, the wind was right and the Elephant was standing broadside. He stalked up with his .375 H&H Magnum, took aim and fired, the animal dropped and then immediately got up, Gus aimed again and fired, and it again dropped and immediately got up. Now the spent cartridge case was jammed in the breech, removing it was a noisy job. The Elephant was up, with its back towards Gus but with it trunk pointing in his direction, sniffing the air, eventually the stuck cartridge case was released, Gus loaded and moved for a better position, he was spotted and the rogue charged. Gus aimed for a spot between its eyes and the first large wrinkle in the trunk, he fired and the animal collapsed snapping one of its tusks sounding like a pistol shot. This time it was dead.

Gus did a post mortem and found that although perfectly placed, the first two bullets were embedded in the skull – insufficient penetration. This was reported to Head Office, other Rangers also found that that batch of Winchester ammunition had poor penetration and was returned to the manufacturer.

Gus came across some more marked Baobabs along the Olifants river they were marked “H.F.E. – 1896” and “N - 1893” and “L.T. “ Gus consulted his map drawn up by Henri Berthauld a Swiss Missionary from Valdesia, near the Elim Hospital in the Soutpansberg, who covered the area on foot including large parts of Mozambique and the South-eastern parts of the then Rhodesia during 1891 and 1898. Many old wagon routes were shown on the map. Gus wondered of the “L.T. weren’t perhaps the initials of Louis Trichardt who passed through the area en route from the Soutpansberg to Delagoa Bay.

Gus was by now very keen on recording Wild Life sounds. His tape recorder and other equipment was never very far off. His recorded bird songs were quite amazing.

Gus now also was studying the different Lion calls and roars, he could distinguish their different meanings, one particular recording never failed to attract any member of the Panthera Leo species in the vicinity.

Once stopping at the water hole at the Nghotsha firebreak, he set up his equipment and almost immediately there were answering roars. The recording was played with about five minute intervals with the responding answering following, very soon three lovely Maned Lions appeared looking for the intruder. They walked around the truck several times, causing the Game Guards on the back to duck and hide on the back. They spray marked the territory, each time carefully smelling the bushes ensuring that the markings was adequate to warn off any intruders.

Gus had a request from Dick Reucassel to accompany him to Pafuri with the object to record the sound of the Pels Fishing Owl – very rare bird of whose habits were very little known of. They set off on 2 June 1969 and were very fortunate to make a good recording, which they played it back and attracted quite a few Owls who would perform until the early hours of the morning, each time improving the quality of the calls previously taped.

Pafuri is a haven for Ornithologists as it is a home for a large variety of birds.

The calls made at Pafuri were included in the record made available by the ‘Wildlife Society of Southern-Africa” I still have this LP with the African Fish Eagle on the cover . . . . .

Elephant control had to be carried out as huge numbers were entering the Park from the neighbouring states; at one stage a population of more than 11000 was estimated. Water and food supply would never sustain such large numbers. The beautiful trees of KRUGER would bear the brunt.

Once during the Elephant culling period a truck with five dead elephant on its way to the SKUKUZA abattoir, capsized on the Letaba River causeway, a number of labourers on the back as well. Four of the labourers were killed when the dead Elephants fell on top of them; the injured were taken to the doctor at the Phalaborwa Mine Clinic for treatment. A big enquiry followed the incident.

_________________
I participate because I care - CUSTOS NATURAE
No to Hotels in and commercialization of our National Parks.
No to Legalized Rhino and Lion trade.
Done 144 visits to National Parks.
What a wonderful privilege.


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 Post subject: Re: LEST WE FORGET
Unread postPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 12:17 pm 
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Gus Adendorff Part 16

Once Gus, Fanie and Dawid together with their teams fought a veld fire burning over an area forty kilometres long which had wept over the Mozambican border at Thaba Ndlovu (the Mountain of the Elephant), burning down to the Manyeleti block a total area of 240 square km was destroyed. Their back burn was from the Maloponyane turnoff to the Nshawu picnic spot, from there to Shiloa, to Kostini; Gus was particularly concerned about the lot of the newly hatched Ostriches of whom there were many in the area.

Plenty of the beautiful silver monarchs with the dark blue vertical stripes and reddish tipped fins with a mouth full of very sharp teeth frequented the Letaba waters during the 1950s, then in the late 60s many pools were netted and not one tiger fish was were found. Many irrigation systems upstream caused the strong flowing current enjoyed by these beautiful fish to a mere little stream in winter, these fluctuations proved to be disastrous to this King of the AFRICAN waters. . . . .

The Nshawu stream enters the Park from Mozambique at Shiloa Hill. Very many years ago a Shangane from Mozambique by the name of Langwane Mbombi, operated at small water hole on the boundary where large herds of animals came to drink. When he did not return home after several days his relations and friends organized a search party, they came across his remains at the water-hole. The pug marks of a Lion were found near his skeleton.

It is assumed that he fell asleep alongside the water-hole and was killed by the Lion. The remains were buried near the spot and stones were packed on top of the grave, the pile of stones still mark the lone grave.

An old Game Guard told Gus the following story: a chief named Shiloa lived at the base of the hill on the eastern boundary marked by the Great Lebombo Mountains. When he died he was buried at the foot of a Baobab tree. Many followers were buried below the hill on the banks of the Nshawu Stream, the Africans were very superstitious about the place and never pointing a finger in that direction, maybe Langwane did, who would ever know.

Kostini also told Gus that many tribes of the Low-veld had suffered devastating raids at the hands of the Zulu armies during the last century. All were slain except for the young women who were taken captive, while many of the older generation including men, fled before the armies arrived.

The pump attendant Mafundise Sithole was returning from leave in Mozambique, it was boiling hot and he was thirsty. He tied an empty bottle onto the end of a stick and dropped it into the Letaba River, when it touched the water it was grabbed by a Crocodile; Mafundisi’s thirst disappeared with fright. Crocodiles are extremely dangerous, especially during the warm summer months and the water is discoloured.

Gus accompanied by fellow ranger Ted Whitfield, once came across a pinkish Elephant near Balule; it had often been reported by tourists. A pinkish colouring covered the front and side of the trunk, the colouring extending to the forehead, encircling the eyes, also covering the front of the legs and groin. The back of the ears were also pinkish, the rest of the body had the normal grey colour.

Gus also confirmed the story about the Cobra that attacked and killed two children of the Game Guard at the Shingoringa picket as told by Fanie Botha in an earlier post, this was very sad for all involved.

I again met Oom Gus on 24 March 1970 at Olifants Camp.

He was on his way to release a little Elephant that had got stuck in the rocks below the Camp. Tas van Staden who was working in the area heard an Elephant trumpeting loudly and on investigation found an Elephant cow on her knees trying to free her little one.

Eventually the herd moved off.

Tas with some assistance freed the little one. The baby was made comfortable in the laundry building in the Camp for the evening, the following morning Oom Gus arrived and the little Elephant was in a frisky mood, frolicking on the lawn with the two Game Guards, it was playfully running around in circles not unlike a little puppy.

I am very fortunate to have captured much of this on my super 8 mm film of our wedding and Vereeniging and our honeymoon spent in KRUGER.

Gus could hear the herd in close proximity to the Camp and soon the little one was reunited with its mother, who caringly caressed it with her trunk, before they disappeared into the bush.

Gus once while on a reconnaissance flight in a helicopter, viewed a Crocodile catching a tiny Hippo calf while the rest of the herd were fleeing into the waters of the Letaba, away from the noise above.

One day Gus was became aware of a fire, it been made deliberately by Parks staff to attract attention, on their way on leave to Punda Maria. The lorry driver had got drunk and overturned the vehicle, injuring two of the passengers along the road, near the Tropic of Capricorn. The injured were taken to the hospital at Sibasa, while, Gus, Ted Whitfield and Tom Mollentze the Ranger at Klipkoppies fought the fire until the early hours of the following morning.

The severe drought at the latter end of 1970 caused the death of many Hippo, one hundred and twenty carcasses were found along the Olifants and another eighty five along the dry Letaba. The drought was so severe that the little remaining water in the pools was congested with a mass of Hippo dung, the stench almost unbearable and the resultant pollution became a very real problem . . . .

The Hippos died of sunburn, their skin requires continuous moistening, otherwise it blisters, the situation was pathetic and very little could be done to assist them. Game Guards were kept busy collecting the tusks of these poor animals.

The rains came early January 1971. One hundred and eighty five millimetres of rain fell within three days, this broke the drought. The ground was sodden, pools filled up; streams flowed like rivers, feeding the Letaba and Olifants and the Engelhard Dam filled up and overflowed at 08:30 on 9 January of that year. Many of the trees in the centre of the dam disappearing under the water of the new dam – forever.

Tom Mollentze and his wife at Klipkoppies were marooned on the eastern boundary and unable to obtain provisions. They arranged by radio that they would meet at a drift in the Letaba where vehicles normally crossed. Tom waded through the water and he was taken to Olifants Camp to purchase the necessary provisions.

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 Post subject: Re: LEST WE FORGET
Unread postPosted: Sat Apr 03, 2010 7:35 pm 
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Gus Adendorff Part 17

Gus and Piet made regular visits to the Engelhard Dam amongst others to inspect the contents of the fish ladders.

After the inspection while driving away lowly, Piet drew Gus’ attention to a huge lying on the side of the dam wall. It was slithering slowly towards their truck and then disappeared under the truck. Piet who was standing on the back kept a wary eye and yelled that the snake was still under the truck.

Gus stopped, grabbed his rifle and leaped out. Piet jumped off, they both looked underneath the truck and – no snake. They ventured closer and still – no snake. They then realised that it had to be in or somewhere on the truck. The bonnet was warily lifted, Piet whispered something inaudible, and there it was – coiled on top of the air cleaner, the snake peered at them with an open mouth and tongue protruding, the black palate clearly visible.

It was huge with thick coils, a slender neck and had a malicious look in its eyes – a fearsome sight. Using some left-over poles from the Dam construction, the snake was wedged against the cylinder head it unrolled and Gus guessed it was about three metres long. Gus decided to shoot the snake – using the trusted .375 H&H magnum would be very effective but not damaging the vehicle was a different story.

He took careful aim and finding a suitable gap, squeezed the trigger and shot the snake in half as well as hole through the engine mounting as well as the pipe leading to the silencer, when the snake stopped wriggling they disentangled it and once the convulsions came to an end, measured it from snout to tail tip – 3.2 metres.

The return trip was quite noisy, however Blackie Zwarts did a quick brazing job and replaced the engine mounting and everything again sounded quite normal.

Gus was once stung by a scorpion, the pain was excruciating and he experienced breathing problems, fortunately the matron from the Baragwanath Hospital, was in the Letaba rest Camp and she injected Gus with scorpion anti venom which was kept for just such an emergency, Gus who had built up an allergic resistance to serum as he had been bitten by snakes a few times, he was then taken to the Phalaborwa Clinic where he was treated and kept under observation for two days until his breathing had returned to normal.

Once on the way to the Hlanganeni Dam, Gus came across an Elephant which had just died, it still was warm. The area was trampled and there was much blood all over, suggesting that it was involved in a fight, on closer examination two holes were found behind the shoulder they were 12 cm in diameter, one hole was 20 cm deep and the other 55 cm – this tusk entered the heart and caused the death.

Gus saw the Shawu Dam filled up the first time, the large variety of game, the most prominent species being Reedbuck, Gus was successful in recording their calls, he was quite thrilled as it was the only opportunity he ever got of making such recording.

The rains of 1972 filled up every pan and dam and depression, the croaking of the frogs was almost deafening, water birds came from all over and Gus was in his element as he could now record insects, more bird species and other calls to his hearts delight. Crowned cranes even made their appearance upstream from te Letaba camp.

Bidzane was on inspection at the confluence of the Letaba and the Olifants when he noticed smoke in the direction of Olifants Camp. He hastened to the Camp arriving in time to see the kitchen roof going up in flames, the entire complex which housed the office, shop, kitchen and dining room was alight and soon all was destroyed – it was 24 February 1972.

The fire was started in the chimney of the kitchen where the oil burning stove was operated; the chimney had become coated with oil and caught alight . . . .

A while later something similar happened at Letaba, fortunately Rein Ernst who was at Olifants at the time of their fire was now Tourist Officer at Letaba, with the assistance of his previous experience the fire in the chimney was quickly extinguished.

Gus spent many hours at the von Wieligh Baobab on the side of the road between Olifants and Letaba watching and listening to the Parrots, the inscription “von Wieligh” is still clearly legible and the date not quite so clear, possibly 1891 or 1892.

Gus together with fellow employees Herman v/d Veen, Don Lowe and Albert D’Assonville were presented with their gold watches for 20 years long service on 22 November 1972, by the Chairman of the National parks Board – Mr. Sybrand van Niekerk, the function was also attended by the Prime Minister Mr. John Vorster.

The Adendorff family now consisting of Bidzane, wife Pat and children Susan, Michael, Irene, John and Eugenie, were quite pleased that they were being transferred to Punda Maria during 1973.

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No to Hotels in and commercialization of our National Parks.
No to Legalized Rhino and Lion trade.
Done 144 visits to National Parks.
What a wonderful privilege.


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 Post subject: Re: LEST WE FORGET
Unread postPosted: Sat Apr 03, 2010 7:38 pm 
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My goodness, gmlsmit! This thread is amazing.
Thanx! :)

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 Post subject: Re: LEST WE FORGET
Unread postPosted: Sun Apr 04, 2010 9:03 am 
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Gus Adendorff Part 18

Bidzane (the man with the Zebra skin hatband) was eager to see the effect of the Lion roars taped at Letaba would have at feline prides of Punda Maria. The equipment was rigged up in the garden and some new roars echoed over the Punda Maria landscape. Almost immediately there was a response – something was strange – there did not seem to be much volume and it also sounded agonised.

Bidzane packed the equipment and set off to where he imagined the response came from. The equipment was set up and the roars again echoed, there was an immediate response this time close by. Gus shone his spotlight and a pair of eyes reflected . . . . The owner was a beautiful dark maned male Lion, in the prime of his life. There was a wire snare around the neck and blood was dripping – the animal seemed to be pleading for help.

The following morning Gus radioed Dr. Pienaar the Head at SKUKUZA and told him about the snared Lion and asked for help. That same afternoon Dr. Salomon Joubert then the Senior Biologist arrived with a dart gun and tranquillizers.

Gus shot an Impala as bait and tied it to a tree close to where he had last seen the Lion. That evening Gus, his family, Salomon and a visiting friend Naas Hamman went into the garden. The recording was played and it was not long before the snared Lion appeared, he immediately went to the bait and laid down next to it. Salomon aimed and fired the dart, they waited a few minutes and when both were satisfied that the drug had taken its effect, approached the sleeping animal. Gus said that this was a most pathetic case of cruelty. There were four strands of wire so taut around its throat that he could not swallow his food. The snare was removed and the wounds were treated with penicillin ointment and the animal was also given a penicillin injection.

Naas put his foot on the Lion’s belly and the pressure released some wind which sounded like a growl, the three imagined that the Lion had come to its senses and scattered . . . .

After the male had been treated he was left to recover, a Landrover with two Rangers was parked close by to look after him until he had sufficiently gotten rid of the after effects and that he was not bothered by the curious Hyaenas. Gus occasionally shot him an Impala and kept him under observation until completely satisfied that “Dimbo” had completely recovered.

It was later discovered that the Lion and three lionesses had left the Park to a neighbouring area with cattle, where they caught a cow, snares were set at the scene of the kill, the male and two of the females were caught in the snares. The females were killed the following morning while the male managed to break away and return to the Park.

After the absence of about three months Dimbo again appeared at Punda Maria, he had again established a little pride with two Lionesses and all seemed to be in good shape. The wound had healed but was not completely covered by hair.

Gus came across the bodies of two Hippos and Dr. V de Vos was called, he confirmed that cause of death – Anthrax – the two bodies were burnt.

Here at Punda Gus had two dogs Flash – a crossbred Rhodesian Ridgeback and Bullterrier who was quite courageous and did not mind chasing a Lion and even nipping a hind foot. The other dog was Vivo, a very well bred mongrel, the two were inseparable.

One very early morning there was barking and Gus found that the two companions had confronted a stray dog on the lawn, Gus shot the dog and sent the body for testing for rabies, the result was positive, Gus realised that as his to faithful companions had been in contact with the stray, they would also have been infected. The Adendorffs were grief stricken but Gus had to do what he had to do . . .

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No to Hotels in and commercialization of our National Parks.
No to Legalized Rhino and Lion trade.
Done 144 visits to National Parks.
What a wonderful privilege.


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 Post subject: Re: LEST WE FORGET
Unread postPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2010 9:42 am 
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Gus Adendorff Part 19

The Pafuri picnic spot was damaged by the flood of 1975. The Levhuvu overflowed its bank to such an extent that huge trees lost their footing in the mud. Many trees were left with their roots exposed as the swirling waters washed away tons of soil.

Gus found indications of earlier habitation on the hills named Matjigwili named after the Chief, not far from the Mashikiri windmill. Ruins of stone were found, fragments of clay pots as well as some blue beads being sacred to the Venda being called “Valunga ha Madi” and were supposed to have been brought many generations ago by the south migrating Venda tribes. These beads were highly prized; they were passed on from generation to generation and would never have been willingly parted of.

The Provincial Roads Department now entered the Park to tar the road from Punda Maria to Letaba. Punda and Shingwedzi were closed to tourists and the accommodation was allotted to the road builders. The animals seemed to adapt quite well to the noise and dust and activity of the heavy machinery, vehicles and staff – much to the contrary of what Bidzane imagined, he was actively opposed against too many roads and tarring of the roads – it would spoil nature and attract too many visitors resulting in interfering with nature.

Gus soon realised that the tar roads were a blessing, they needed little maintenance and there was no dust, therefore the animals seemed to prefer the grazing alongside the tarred roads to that of the dusty corrugated gravel roads . . . .

Bidzane mentioned the wonderful pet their friends Ben and Quarta Pretorius of Shingwedzi had, it was “Vark” – Pig, a hand reared Warthog . . . . . When it was time to release it they decided to do so at the Roan/Sable Antelope paddock on the eastern plains (Gus’ pride). When ever Ben arrived at the paddock, the Warthog would come up to him but the Game Guards really developed their tree climbing skill here in the paddock, they were not tolerated.

Mrs. Rowland Jones their old friend often visited them at Punda Maria, a place she also loved and had very fond memories of; many evenings were spent telling of the old times.

Gumbandebvu Hill near Punda was regarded by the Africans as being the rain hill.
Many years ago a black woman Nwakama, a relative of Modjadji the famous Rain Queen, lived there. Nwakama was also supposed to have been vested with the powers to call up the Rain Gods. When rain was needed she ordered a black beast to be slaughtered and the meat to be taken to a certain spot on the hill and offered as a sacrifice to the Rain Gods. Only a few chosen men were allowed to venture onto the hill with her as it was believed to mean certain death for anyone attempting to climb the hill without her knowledge . . . .

Gus could never establish whether anyone had lost their lives for climbing up Gumbandebvu; however Mr. Murdoch who did duty as Tourist Officer at Punda was eager to climb the hill. No one would accompany him and he decided to do so on his own. That evening he returned to Punda quite exhausted. The following morning, one of the Camp attendants took him his early morning coffee, there was no reply, the door was eventually forced open and the white man lay dead in his bed, perhaps he had a weak heart and overtaxed it during the climb, the Africans in the area believed that he had died as a result of his defying the gods by climbing the hill. . . .

Kush, one of the Police constables working with Sergeant van Deventer loved his liquor; it being very expensive, he produced his own concoctions from anything that could ferment.

One evening the staff in the compound was trying the latest of his masterpieces, the celebrations were getting more and more rowdy. The Sergeant could not sleep and decided to put an end to it. He took a sheet and his torch, with the sheet draped around him he walked slowly down the hill towards the compound, the tasting abruptly came to an end.

The following morning Gus was told of a tall ghost with a great ball of fire on its head . . . . .

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No to Hotels in and commercialization of our National Parks.
No to Legalized Rhino and Lion trade.
Done 144 visits to National Parks.
What a wonderful privilege.


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 Post subject: Re: LEST WE FORGET
Unread postPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2010 10:16 am 
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Gus Adendorff Part 20


Gus received many visitors amongst others the author T.V. Bulpin and the artist Penny Miller, he also had the privilege of meeting Bvekenya the legendary ivory hunter of period the 1910 to 1930.

Oom Gus often said to him KRUGER was heaven on earth; it would be very sad for hom to one day have to leave . . . . .

With the retirement time close by, Gus and Pat and some friends were sitting in the garden, enjoying their last few days, from the dark there was a large volume of rolling thunderous roars close to their motor gate. The group drove to the gate and went through, not far out, Dimbo appeared, he lay down next the vehicle, He proudly displayed himself he was now again a beautiful Lion, his scars all covered with hair and his wonderful now dark mane, he came closer to the two vehicles and laid down, close by, next to them looking up. . . . . For Gus and Pat this visit by the KING of Kloppersfontein was an appropriate farewell to a wonderful twenty - seven years in the KRUGER NATIONAL PARK. . . . . . .

On 31st March 1977, the day of their departure there were many tears while the farewells were said, they moved to Louis Trichardt were they lived for five years until the time for Bidzane came – the 3rd November 1982.

Mrs. Pat Adendorff, the friendly lady, wife and mother and Rangers wife to whom I am very greatfull for her assistance with this epitome of an old time GAME RANGER, in whose mould which hopefully many successors will be cast, spent her 80th birthday during the first week of March this year with her family, visiting John Adendorff now the Manager: Conservation Planning of the ADDO ELEPHANT NATIONAL PARK.

Bidzane will always be remembered as a man who protected all; he had great empathy for Mother Nature and all her Children, he was a scholar who never stopped learning, he was always a gentleman. His photographs and sound recordings still often bring fond memories to those he loved so dearly.

No wonder Dr. Tol Pienaar called him one of the great nature lovers of his time. He was no yes man, he spoke his mind but he was also a good listener.

The memory of the Ranger with the Zebra skin hatband lives on in the emerging tusker – Bidzane.

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I participate because I care - CUSTOS NATURAE
No to Hotels in and commercialization of our National Parks.
No to Legalized Rhino and Lion trade.
Done 144 visits to National Parks.
What a wonderful privilege.


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 Post subject: Re: LEST WE FORGET
Unread postPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2010 10:48 am 
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Wow, what a story. :)

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 Post subject: Re: LEST WE FORGET
Unread postPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2010 11:07 am 
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Hello Gerhard

Ever read The Ivory Trail (T V Bulpin)? I was fortunate enough to live/work in the Pafuri area and managed to find a lot of places mentioned in this book (even did a couple of short incursions into our neighbouring countries, but that is another story)

I really enjoy this thread. Know/knew a lot of people you included here, alas time has caught up with most of them

Have you ever met "Oom" Alwyn, used to be the traffic cop in the north? A colourful character by all accounts. During World War II he apparently boxed/sparred against Joe Louis. Stories about him, Oom Cas and traffic cop Frans (with the mirror lense sunglasses) also make for interesting reading

Keep it up!

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 Post subject: Re: LEST WE FORGET
Unread postPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2010 11:10 am 
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Hi.
I have not met oom Alwyn but I know about Cas v/d Walt with the red hair who was a Traffic Officer in the Southern Part of the Park . . . .

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No to Hotels in and commercialization of our National Parks.
No to Legalized Rhino and Lion trade.
Done 144 visits to National Parks.
What a wonderful privilege.


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 Post subject: Re: LEST WE FORGET
Unread postPosted: Fri Apr 09, 2010 8:07 pm 
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H.S. Caldecott.

Harry Stratford Caldecott was born in Kimberley on 27 may 1886. He was educated at the South African College, Cape Town and the St. Johns College, Johannesburg. He was at first articled to a firm of solicitors in Johannesburg.

He abandoned his legal career in 1912 and went to Paris to study painting at the Academie Julian and Ecole Nationale de Beaux-Arts.

He returned to South Africa in 1923, intending to go back to France after a year. He met Florence Zerffi, the curator of the Michaelis Gallery in Cape Town They married and settled in the shadows of Table Mountain.

Here he turned to writing to supplement his income from art.

As a writer artist he was commissioned to the Sabie Game Reserve in order to promote conservation. Here he met Lieut. Col. J Stevenson Hamilton.

At the Sabie Game Reserve during his two months stay, he developed a deep love of wildlife.

On his return he created this poster:

Image

the first used in wildlife areas in Southern Africa.

Caldecott worked tirelessly for conservation and founded the Cape Branch of the Wildlife Protection Society.

He died of cancer in Wynberg on 12 December 1929.

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I participate because I care - CUSTOS NATURAE
No to Hotels in and commercialization of our National Parks.
No to Legalized Rhino and Lion trade.
Done 144 visits to National Parks.
What a wonderful privilege.


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 Post subject: Re: LEST WE FORGET
Unread postPosted: Sat May 01, 2010 11:50 am 
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Dr. Ian Player – Part 1.

Many people may question this posting on this thread.

I am posting this as a tribute to great man who has dedicated his life to Conservation in South Africa – his contribution to KRUGER is 8000 White Rhino and 300 Black Rhino.

Ian Cedric Player was born on 15th March 1927, of Scots, Dutch and English Settlers. . He was educated in the St. John’s College in Johannesburg; a bad knee injury cut short his sporting career. He left school at the age of sixteen

After fooling the doctors during his medics, he served with the 6th Armoured Division attached to the 5th American Army in Italy during the period 1944 to 1946. After the war he worked as a miner, a prospector, a factory hand, an articled clerk and a professional fisherman. He loved the bush and had ambitions of spending his life there. He started his career with the Natal Parks Board as a Cadet Ranger at St. Lucia in 1952.

He was soon transferred to Umfolozi where he became a Senior Ranger in 1954; he became Senior Warden in 1962 and Chief Conservator for Zululand in 1964. He resigned from the Natal Parks Board in 1`974 and became more involved with the Wilderness Leadership School, which he had founded in 1957.


He married Felicity Ann Farrar on 16 May 1957, they have two sons and a daughter.

Ceaseless persecution of the animals by poachers and hunters in the past have decimated its numbers to a point at which its survival had become questionable.

A team of highly trained Rangers whose chief function would be the protection of White Rhino and eventually its capture and translocation to other parts of the world, thereby ensuring its survival.

In this task they were assisted by a Zulu Game Guard force recruited from the Tribal Reserves. It was during this period that his friendship with his guide end mentor Qubu Magqubu Ntombela who had begun his career in 1918, it was a profound friendship between a Black and a White man that took them along Rhino, Elephant and Hippo paths, across the White and Black Umfolozi Rivers, across the areas where the Great Zulu Kings Dingiswayo, Shaka and others roamed and reigned.

Two men of entirely different age, culture and backgrounds who learnt from each other, revealing the interdependence of man, the landscapes and the wildlife. They suggested that the healing powers of nature has the powers of transforming a nation.

Their association involved battling of poaching gangs, initiating the internationally famous capture and translocation of the Rhinos, setting aside the first Wilderness Area in Southern Africa and leading the first Wilderness Trails.

Ian Player still believes that the National Parks and Game Reserves of AFRICA harbour the “the ancient spirit, older than the spirit of man” as described by Genl. Smuts, in the brooding Lowveld, in our remote mountain areas and wild coastlines.

We have places of more precious than any other worldly gifts, places where a spiritual connection between human beings and the land still exists and should be maintained.

These places however are protected by a fragile thin membrane, a caul that can be torn and rendered useless. Our greatest contribution to modern world and society could be our nurturing and protection of the wilderness areas. Sensible management will provide enormous benefits for all as it is a renewable natural resource.

D.H. Lawrence wrote “in the dust where we have buried the silent races and their abominations, we have buried so much of the delicate magic of life”.

Marie-Louise von Franz wrote “The Western World is in an inner state of crisis. It is so crushed by the mass mindedness of our civilization, due largely to the problem of over-population that many people feel superfluous”.

Robert Johnson wrote “people feel too wounded to live, but unable to die”. We see a world anaesthetizing itself with alcohol and drugs. In other places these substances were used as a divine sacrament to bring visions of God and gods. With no sacred means of expression we can express our need only symptomatically, through substance abuse, terrorism and wars and finally, madness”.

Marie-Louise von Franz also wrote that “Western civilization is in danger of building a wall of rationality in its society, which feeling cannot penetrate. Everything has to be rational, and emotion . . . . . is frowned upon”.

Ian Player is of opinion that AFRICA is imitating the Western World, unfortunately at its peril. There is a continuing need to dominate and subdue nature and all wild things. We have seen the elimination of 60 000000 Bison in America. The destruction of nature in AFRICA is visible, he says all we have left in South Africa are the National Parks and game Reserves, even they are only witness areas but still of immense importance for AFRICA and the rest of the world.

Carl Jung concluded of the West “we have lost a world that once pulsed our blood and breathed with our breath”.

Ian Player commented that during many of his travels to Europe and the United States and the Far East that he observed a weariness, a travel without purpose, instead of pilgrimages they are escapes. AFRICA can reintroduce this pilgrimage and give a new dimension to travel linked to our new age of exploration, not only in outer space but also of the inner dimension of humanness.

Ian Player has lectured, promoted conservation films and raised funds for environmental projects, both within South Africa and Internationally.

He has founded and influenced International conservation links and relationships throughout AFRICA, Europe and the United States of America.

He received the following awards:

Gold Medal for Conservation from the San Diego Zoological Society in 1968.

Order of the Golden Ark from Prince Bernard of the Netherlands in 1982.

Paul Harris Fellow from Rotary International in 1984.

Decoration for Meritorious Service (the highest South African civil award) in 1984.

Honorary Doctorate of Philosophy from the University of Natal in 1984.

Honorary Doctor of Law (LLD)(h.c.) from Rhodes University.

Distinguished Wilderness Resource Lecturer from the University of Idaho in 1988.

Bruno Shubert Award a German Lifetime Award for Conservation in 2003.

SAB Lifetime Achievement Award from the S.A. Breweries in 2003.

Golden Eagle Award from the St. John’s School, Johannesburg.

Spirit of Africa Award Game Rangers Association in 2005.

Achiever of the year from Simonsvlei Awards 2008.

The Peter H. Capstick Hunting Heritage Award (PHCHHA).

South African Sport Hall of Fame – Canoeing in 2009.

Safari Club International Conservationist of the Year Award 2009

Birdlife Port Natal in 2009 in recognition of outstanding dedication shown to Birds and Birding.

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No to Hotels in and commercialization of our National Parks.
No to Legalized Rhino and Lion trade.
Done 144 visits to National Parks.
What a wonderful privilege.


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