Skip to content

SANParks.org Forums

View unanswered posts | View active topics






Post new topic Reply to topic  Page 8 of 9
 [ 127 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Impala Babies there yet?
Unread postPosted: Sat Nov 20, 2010 9:31 pm 
First two Voortrekker Road today:

Image

Image


Last one north of Berg en Dal Today:

Image


Top
  
 
 Post subject: Re: New borns in Kruger
Unread postPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2011 5:23 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2004 5:54 pm
Posts: 43033
Location: Somerset West, Cape Town
Not long to go until the magical time of new life in the Impala herds in KNP .... :dance:

_________________
Sawubona
Dalene


It's not too late at all. You just don't yet know what you are capable of. Mahatma Gandhi


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Anyone know if the Impalas started giving birth as yet?
Unread postPosted: Sun Nov 27, 2011 2:21 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2004 5:54 pm
Posts: 43033
Location: Somerset West, Cape Town
Witnessing this event is really special.

I find getting good pics of the lambs really challenging. The mother's are protective and move the young off as soon as one drives up to a herd. The babies are awfully cute. Some seem more awake about life than others ... they are the ones that will make it I suppose.

Took this on 18/11/11 - the first we saw on this trip:
Image

Here are some snaps for you guys taken on 21/11/11:
Image

Image

I have been so hoping to see a birth ....

_________________
Sawubona
Dalene


It's not too late at all. You just don't yet know what you are capable of. Mahatma Gandhi


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Babies of the Bush
Unread postPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2011 12:57 am 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Tue Sep 20, 2011 1:45 pm
Posts: 403
Location: London
I know that animals like Impalas like to wait until the bush turns green, to give birth. Are there any animals that have newborns in July/August (ie winter)?

_________________
Berg en Dal: 10/08/2014 - 13/08/2014
Satara: 13/08/2014 - 16/08/2014
Croc Bridge: 16/08/2014 - 17/08/2014


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Babies of the Bush
Unread postPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 2:51 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2011 2:48 am
Posts: 2
I doubt any animals have evolved to make winter their birthing season? I would imagine there are some animals that give birth throughout the year though? Anyone know?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Babies of the Bush
Unread postPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 10:46 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:31 pm
Posts: 10380
Location: Ballito, KZN North Coast, South Africa
I do know Kudu, Nyala, and Duiker, can drop their young at any time of the year but most births do coincide with the rainy season.
My book also says that the Klipspringer gives birth at any time of the year although there is some evidence of seasonal peaks at least in some regions, same with the Steenbok.

_________________
Where ever you go, go with all your Heart.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Babies of the Bush
Unread postPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2011 3:36 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2011 2:48 am
Posts: 2
Well quite a few of those antelope are hardy and prefer the dry northern Kruger don't they? So I would imagine they have less issue giving birth in drier times, as they don't rely on having as much water lush green plants?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Babies of the Bush
Unread postPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2011 3:51 am 
The animals mentioned by Elsa are also mostly browsers and are habitat specific and they re not as common as Impala who have a specific lambing season.

Mass lambing in Impala are also a way of ensuring an abundance of food for a very short time to ensure that as many lambs as possible survive the first few months until they have the skills to fend for themselves.

Almost all the species that lamb / calf or foal in a specific period are species that congregate in herds. This however do not apply to buffalo who calf throughout the year.


Top
  
 
 Post subject: Re: Babies of the Bush
Unread postPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2011 3:46 am 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Tue Sep 20, 2011 1:45 pm
Posts: 403
Location: London
I am guessing buffalo suffer fewer casualties from predators, compared with Impala. 50 impala have no chance fighting back when a pride of lions is in pursuit, whereas 50 buffalo can probably repel many of these attacks - I wonder whether this influences the non specific time of year for buffalo calves?

What about Wildebeast, Giraffe and Zebra?

_________________
Berg en Dal: 10/08/2014 - 13/08/2014
Satara: 13/08/2014 - 16/08/2014
Croc Bridge: 16/08/2014 - 17/08/2014


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Babies of the Bush
Unread postPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2011 3:54 am 
Wildebeest and Zebra also tend to have a birth season that coincides with the start of the rainy season.

That is however not the case with Giraffe who calf throughout the year.

Buffalo also calf throughout the year but there is a incline in births at the start of the rainy season.


Top
  
 
 Post subject: Re: Babies of the Bush
Unread postPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2011 4:36 am 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Tue Sep 20, 2011 1:45 pm
Posts: 403
Location: London
@Joao - you are a fountain of knowledge! I am guessing the cats also like to have their young in spring?

_________________
Berg en Dal: 10/08/2014 - 13/08/2014
Satara: 13/08/2014 - 16/08/2014
Croc Bridge: 16/08/2014 - 17/08/2014


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Babies of the Bush
Unread postPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2011 4:51 am 
The cats don't necessarily have their babies in spring.

During the wetter season the prey animals tend to disperse to parts further away from water as there are more water available in the veld. This makes it more difficult for predators as they have to move further to catch there pray.

In the drier times the prey stay closer to permanent water and this makes it much easier for the predators which in turn produce more food for the young ones. In times of drought the cat population tend to increase due to the weak state of the prey species.


Top
  
 
 Post subject: Re: Babies of the Bush
Unread postPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2011 6:34 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Oct 21, 2008 2:30 pm
Posts: 9
Location: Durban, South Africa
G5000 - lovely thread which I too find rather facinating.
I was once given some info, which maybe Joao can verify, about Impala's which was:
a) One of the reasons they are so prolific is that they are both grazers and browsers so can survive the dry times.
b) During the rutting season the males loose so much condition trying to protect their harem, that they eventually become too weak and are replaced by a fitter fellow who then introduces new/different genes into the group.
I understood that it was as much as 30% of their body weight that the poor guys may loose from making new Impalas, running around chasing his ladies and protecting his ladies from the bad lads.
c) The lambs are dropped when the conditions are right.
They can prolong this until the rains have arrived.
d) The lambs are dropped all at the same time thus improving the survival rate of the youngsters.
When the first ewe delivers, it seems to spark off a chain reaction.

Resilient to say the least - isn't nature wonderful?

Bushdad


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Babies of the Bush
Unread postPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2011 10:48 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:31 pm
Posts: 10380
Location: Ballito, KZN North Coast, South Africa
bushdad,
There is the old adage about safety in numbers,
not sure on the feeding method that makes them more resilient, but possibly so.

I am sure the males of many species do lose condition during the mating period.

The thinking now is that its a myth that lambs are only dropped when conditions are right, when the gestation period is up then they will give birth.

I do agree that nature is wonderful. :D

Sure Joao will be able to offer some more info on your questions. :thumbs_up:

_________________
Where ever you go, go with all your Heart.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Babies of the Bush
Unread postPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2011 10:51 pm 
Hi bushdad.

I am definitely not a specialist regarding these things.

I do have some answers for you regarding your questions though.

a. Yes it is true that Impala are both grazers and browsers.
They are predominantly browsers but graze as well.
b. I am not sure that this is true.
The males do loose condition during the rut and mating season but generally the dominant male stay with his harem until the next rut starts during which he may be ousted by a stronger and fitter male.
c. The lambs are dropped during the onset of the rainy season but it is a myth that Impala can prolong their gestation.
d. Most of the lambs are born in a relatively short space of time but this is again not related to the first ewe dropping her lamb.
The period in which they mate a short and therefor the lambs are born in a short period.
This does have a positive effect on the survival rate.

I hope you got some info which may be of help.


Top
  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 127 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Graeme & Nicky and 4 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group

Webcams Highlights

Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Submitted by omaerika at 17:30:52 Submitted by BevAnn at 18:07:01 Submitted by fenman5 at 17:16:15 Submitted by Trudie at 13:59:29