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 Post subject: Re: Bird ID Challenge.
Unread postPosted: Sun Jan 03, 2010 8:06 pm 
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Junior Virtual Ranger
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Happy New Year to All the Stiffnecks.

Thought I'd get the New Year challenge rolling so you can all practice looking up id's from the new bird books you got in your Christmas stockings!

Bird ID Challenge no #71

As usual, please PM me if you require any clues to the following.

No.1
Image

No.2
Image

No.3
Image

No.4
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No.5
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No.6
Image

Barcud

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 Post subject: Re: Bird ID Challenge.
Unread postPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2010 7:27 am 
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Hi to everybody! The year started with a Bang and so the first week has run out already and time for our next Challenge!

For the benefit of all the new members :
a Weekly Challenge is posted on a Friday,
After running for a week and a half, the answers will be revealed on the Monday, giving you roughly 10 days to submit the answers.
Members submit their answers via PM to that weeks "Challenge Master" 8)
Deefstes
Imax
JenB
Myself &
Barcud - helps out when everything comes to a stand still! Thanks Barcud!

So, compete against yourself and learn more about our Southern African Birds!

Good luck!

Challenge #72

#1
Image
Larger Image

#2
Image
Larger Image

#3
Image
Larger Image

#4
Image
Larger Image

#5
Image
Larger Image

#6
Image
Larger Image

PM me directly with your answers
Lizet


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 Post subject: Re: Bird ID Challenge.
Unread postPosted: Mon Jan 11, 2010 8:00 pm 
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Answers to Challenge no#71.

Five people attempted this one with a combined average of 50% correct.

No. 1 - Secretarybird.
The clues to look for here were the long legs and facial colour. Photo taken at Babalala.

No. 2 - Immature African Harrier-hawk. A bit tricky this one. Superficially resembling an Eagle, but the pale inner coverts on the wings, the two tone appearance of the wings, tail length and shape and slim bill were all pointers to this one. This bird was raiding a Southern Black Tit nest just South of Shingwedzi.

No. 3 - Immature Bateleur. Facial pattern, short tail and feet projecting beyond tail were the best pointers for Id'ing this one. Photo taken near Sirheni camp.

No. 4 - Female White-headedVulture. Fairly obvious this one. The combination of white head, belly, inner secondaries and midwing line are diagnostic. Males would have all black secondaries. Photo taken near Olifants.

No. 5 - African Goshawk. Eye colour, greyish cere, barring on underparts and tail pattern give clues to this one. Photo taken in the staff village at Skukuza.

No. 6 - Shikra.
Not easy this one. Head markings, yellow cere, reddish barring to underparts, and red eye (not obvious in this pic) would help to ID this one. Photo taken at Crooks Corner as it chased some Doves.

Hope you enjoyed this challenge.

Barcud

Read more about:

1. Secretarybird
2. African Harrier-Hawk
3. Bateleur
4. White-headed Vulture
5. African Goshawk
6. Shikra

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 Post subject: Re: Bird ID Challenge.
Unread postPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2010 4:23 pm 
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Senior Virtual Ranger
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We better get a new schedule set-up of when its each of our turns. Ill do this week as I have a slightly better change of remembering than Deefstes. :twisted: :lol:

A bit early:
Challenge 72

# 1
Image
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# 2
Image
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#3
Image
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Photo #4 not available anymore.

#5
Image
Larger Image

#6
Image
Larger Image


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 Post subject: Bird ID Challenge 2010 - 2011
Unread postPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 5:17 pm 
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Location: Pretoria
Challenge #72 Answers

#1- Mosque Swallow: The white throat and underwing coverts are the features to distinguishes it from Red-breasted Swallow.

#2- Olive Bush-shrike: The ruddy form male has the pink wash to the upper breast, the grey head and olive back

#3- Pied Babbler: White and black bird- having the head, back and under parts all white. The tail and folded wings are black.

#4- Red-fronted Tinkerbird: Differs from the Pied barbet by the smaller size, the lack of a broad white eyebrow and more yellow on the secondaries.

#5- Trumpeter Hornbill: The male has this bigger casque. Can very easily be distinguishes from the much bigger Silvery-cheeked which has a very different casque shape.

#6-Black-and-white Flycatcher: The female has the brown upper parts with the all white underparts, dark head and bright yellow eyes and feet. The male is all black above.

Read more about:

1. Mosque Swallow
2. Olive Bush-Shrike
3. Southern Pied Babbler
4. Red-fronted Tinkerbird
5. Trumpeter Hornbill
6. Black-and-white Flycatcher unfortunately not on the Bird Index yet.


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 Post subject: Re: Bird ID Challenge.
Unread postPosted: Sat Jan 23, 2010 6:35 pm 
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Junior Virtual Ranger
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Posts: 590
Good afternoon all,

Hope you are ready for the next raptor ID challenge. This will be my last one on Raptors (I've run out of pixs) until I can get back to Kruger or SA. A couple of extra pixs for you on this one. Please PM me with your answers.

Bird ID Challenge#74

No.1.
Image

No.2.
Image

No.3.
Image

No.4.
Image

No.5.
Image

No.6.
Image

No.7.
Image

No.8.
Image


As usual, if you need any hints or tips before answering, please PM me.

Have fun,

Barcud

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Barcud

A Birder's Eye View of Kruger


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 Post subject: Re: Bird ID Challenge.
Unread postPosted: Mon Jan 25, 2010 7:27 pm 
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Challenge 73 answers

#1 Olive Bush-shrike – Most of you decided based on the grayish head, but the pale breast and belly with the light pinkish wash is they key. Looking closely the black mask is just visible
#2 Redwinged Francolin – all had this one right – the rufous belly is they key here, but I also recently learned that it has quite a large bill in relation to its head.
#3 Saddle billed stork – Easy one, very distinct wing pattern
#4 Southern Black Tit – At the angle I had to give a mark to one guess of Carps Tit, but on retrospect, have to with draw it as that species has a black vent and the Southern Black has a barred grey vent, just visible in the photo. The black body and white wing bars are the key to identify it, and don’t be fooled that it is hanging upside down. As a leaf and bark preener it will do this
#5 Great Spotted Cuckoo – some guesses at an owl in this one, but the “ear tufts” are actually the birds crest. The grey back with white spotting is where the bird gets its name from. The Light brown head with the typical long body should get you to the right id.
#6 Willow Warbler – the starting point of this one is to have a look at the surroundings – the bird is in a tree and a broad leaved one at that. This rules out all the aquatic species, which should have been in reeds or low growth along water. The bird has a very distinct white eyebrow without a clear yellow colour, which rules out Willow and Icterine Warbler.

Read more about:

1. Olive Bush-Shrike
2. Red-winged Francolin
3. Saddle-billed Stork
4. Southern Black Tit
5. Great Spotted Cuckoo
6. Willow Warbler


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 Post subject: Re: Bird ID Challenge.
Unread postPosted: Mon Feb 01, 2010 9:52 pm 
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Answers to ID Challenge #74

A good response for this one with 9 participants. Some had another go at them after clues were given and did even better.

No.1 - Rock Kestrel. Combination of grey head, rich, rufous underparts, grey undertail with broad black sub-terminal bar with fainter black barring, barred underwing and hovering behaviour all good pointers to this one. 8 out of 9 correct at the first attempt.

No.2- Lesser Kestrel. Plain grey underwing, pale, buffy underparts, plain grey tail with broad, black sub-terminal band all pointers to this one. 7 out of 9 correct at the first attempt.

No.3 - African Fish Eagle, an immature, probably in it's second calendar year.
A few opted for Palm Nut Vulture on this one and I can see why (had to re-check it myself after the 4th answer in case I had an armchait tick!). The things to look for were the combination of pale, creamy head, hint of an eyestripe, flecking on the breast (not obvious in this pic), white tail with dark terminal tail band (PNV has black tail with white terminal band at this age). The black base to the primaries on the underwing forming a brad crescent being the best pointer here. 4 out of 9 correct at the first attempt.

No.4 - Peregrine Falcon. This one fooled a lot of you due to the colouring of the inderparts. African Hobby being the main answer submitted. This is a 2nd calendar year female, taken in spring. The rich underpart colouring is due to the photo being taken at sunset. Best clues are the broad, black moustache, broad wing base and barrell chested appearance. AH would be richer in colour, slimmer built with the wings appearing proportionately longer and slimmer. 1 out of 9 correct at the first attempt.

No.5 - Montagu's Harrier, sub-adult male. Combination of dark secondaries, rufous breast markings and heavily streaked flanks. This bird is in moult from brown immature to greyer sub-adult. 6 out of 9 correct at the first attempt.

No.6 - Black Harrier. Yellow eye, extent of white on underwing and long, boldly marked tail were all clues to look for on this one. 4 out of 9 correct at the first attempt.

No.7 - Booted Eagle. Dark Phase. The pale, barred wing panels & pale leading edge to the forewing were the clues to this one, but not easy from this photo. 1 out of 9 correct at the first attempt.

No.8 - Black Kite. Black tip to the bill & greyer looking than Yellow-billed Kite. Less rufous on the underparts. 8 out of 9 correct at the first attempt.

Some of these were not easy to ID, so well done to all who had a go. Even the incorrect answers were for very similar looking species. If I'd posted the locations of where each photo was taken, you could have ruled out quite a few of the species submitted as answers.

I promise to post one that's a little easier next time, and raise a smile or two!?

Good Birding.

Barcud

Read more about:

1. Rock Kestrel
2. Lesser Kestrel
3. African Fish Eagle
4. Peregrine Falcon
5. Montagu's Harrier
6. Black Harrier
7. Booted Eagle
8. Black Kite unfortunately not on the Bird Index yet.

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Barcud

A Birder's Eye View of Kruger


Last edited by Barcud on Tue Feb 09, 2010 6:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Bird ID Challenge.
Unread postPosted: Tue Feb 09, 2010 6:54 pm 
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Junior Virtual Ranger
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Did anyone notice my mistake in my Raptor challenge answers?

I've edited it with the correction. The Peregrine was a 2nd Calendar year bird not 1st as posted initially.

For those of you who don't know, a bird in it's 1st year becomes a second calendar year bird on the 1st January and so forth.

My apologies if I confused anyone.

Barcud

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 Post subject: Re: Bird ID Challenge.
Unread postPosted: Tue Feb 09, 2010 7:33 pm 
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Senior Virtual Ranger
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Answers to Challenge #75.

#1
Image
Larger view
African Cuckoo (5/8). I expected the confusion species here to be Common Cuckoo but interestingly enough, no-one opted for that one. At any rate, this bird's bold yellow base to the bill reaching over the base of the lower mandible as well as the upper mandible is perhaps the strongest feature pointing towards African Cuckoo. Two participants selected Thick-billed Cuckoo which would have shown a white throat, virtually no yellow to the bill and a much longer tail.

In the interest of full disclosure, one participant also opted for Red-chested Cuckoo and to be very honest, I can't rule that one out 100% although I am fairly certain that it's not. This bird's back appears quite dark which would have been a good feature for Red-chested Cuckoo but it can also be seen that the bird is sitting in partial shade which makes it appear darker than it is. While the chest is not visible, at least some red should have been visible towards the throat and to the best of my knowledge Red-chested Cuckoo does not have that much yellow to the base of the bill either.

#2
Image
Larger view
Pale Batis (6/8). Can be told apart from the very similar Chinspot Batis by the narrower breast band and the white supercilium. If it makes those who've identified it as a Chinspot Batis feel any better, I've seen bird guides illustrating this last feature incorrectly, Roberts Multimedia being one of them.

#3
Image
Larger view
African Harrier-Hawk (8/8). This is the only bird that everyone identified correctly and I half expected that. While the silhouette offers no real discernible detail the general shape and habit of raiding a hanging bird nest is typical of African Harrier-Hawk.

#4
Image
Larger view
Retz's Helmet-Shrike (3/8). This was the stinker of the challenge with only three correct entries. The black body, red feet and white vent and undertail identifies it as such. It's obviously a juvenile as the adult would have shown the distinctive red bill and orbital wattles as well as a yellow iris. The very similar Chestnut-fronted Helmet-Shrike would have shown a more slaty grey colour as opposed to this bird's black.

#5
Image
Larger view
White-crested Helmet-Shrike (7/8). Again, a juvenile. I was hoping that this would nudge the minds towards Helmet-Shrike to help with the previous bird as well :D At least this one didn't pose too much of an identification challenge.

#6
Image
Larger view
Capped Wheatear (4/8). And once again, a juvenile. The incorrect answers on this one ranged from Karoo Lark to Tree Pipit, all of which would have shown more streaking on the undersides as opposed to this dull mottling.

Identifying it as a Wheatear is done on the bird's general structure and not on specific features as such. This is difficult to describe but Larks in general have much heavier bills while Pipits have a rather different facial pattern, usually with a much clearer supercilium.

Read more about:

1. African Cuckoo
2. Pale Batis unfortunately not on the Bird Index yet.
3. African Harrier-Hawk
4. Retz's Helmet-Shrike
5. White-crested Helmet-Shrike
6. Capped Wheatear

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 Post subject: Re: Bird ID Challenge.
Unread postPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2010 10:12 am 
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Virtual Ranger
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Posts: 613
Location: Pretoria
Challenge #76 Answers

#1 - Brimstone Canary(11/11): Everybody got this one. Yellowish plumage and large bill. The yellow throat contrast with the olive green breast and cheeks.
Image
Larger Image

#2 - Pink-throated Twinspot(10/11): The brown crown instead of a grey crown distinguish this one from Red-throated Twinspot. The pink patches coming through on the upper breast indicates juv. male
Image
Larger Image

#3 - African Green Pigeon(8/11):The olive upperparts with the brown tip of the under tail was the clues here.
Image
Larger Image

#4 - White Starred Robin (11/11): Everybody had this one correct. The All grey head and white "stars" on forehead, yellow breast, belly and vent makes it easy to ID.
Image
Larger Image

#5 - Malachite Sunbird Female(1/11): The most difficult one of the week. The grey upper parts with mottling instead of streaking on the breast, washed with yellow is the best clues. There is a hint of a small supercilium and the bill is rather long and stout.
Image
Larger Image

#6 - Cape Batis(10/11):Very easy with the chestnut running down the flanks.The male has this broad black chest band with the golden eyes.
Image
Larger Image

Read more about:

1. Brimstone Canary
2. Pink-throated Twinspot
3. African Green Pigeon
4. White-starred Robin unfortunately not on the Bird Index yet.
5. Malachite Sunbird
6. Cape Batis


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 Post subject: Re: Bird ID Challenge.
Unread postPosted: Wed Feb 24, 2010 9:16 pm 
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Junior Virtual Ranger
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Hi All,

I've just realised that I'll be away this weekend, so am posting challenge #78 a couple of days early.

A bit different this week. Imagine you are at one of the South coast Parks, it's been an El Nino year and all the krill and fish have suddenly moved North. You are confronted with species (mostly) new to you and have to sort them out quickly!

Please PM me with your answers.

As far as I'm aware, all bar one of the following are on the South African list.

No. 1.
Image

No. 2.
Image

No. 3.
Image

No. 4.
Image

No. 5.
Image

No. 6.
Image

No. 7.
Image

No. 8.
Image

No. 9.
Image

Barcud

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A Birder's Eye View of Kruger


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 Post subject: Re: Bird ID Challenge.
Unread postPosted: Tue Mar 02, 2010 10:37 am 
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Location: Jo'burg
Answers to Challenge #77. Sorry for this being a day late.
There were 8 participants to this challenge and one extra entry only for bird number 5 (getting it right I might add but being only the second one to do so).

#1
Image
Larger view
Senegal Lapwing (4/8) - All the other answers were, understandably, for Black-winged Lapwing. While these two birds are generally not too difficult to tell apart, this picture shows, as far as I'm concerned, only one feature that can be used, that being the black margin to the grey bib. On Senegal Lapwing this margin is narrow while on Black-winged Lapwing it is broader and changes more diffusely from grey to black. Another feature that might be discernible from this picture is the legs that are black and not deep red but I'm not convinced that this picture really shows the leg colour (or lack thereof as it happens).

Other features that this picture doesn't show of course are the yellow (as opposed to red) orbital ring and the smaller white patch on the forehead.

As a matter of interest, avid followers of the Bird Identification forums may recall that some of these birds have featured there on occasion. This particular bird has been discussed here and here.

Also there is a page on this bird at the SANParks Forums Species Accounts.

#2
Image
Larger view
Bare-cheeked Babbler (5/8) with two incorrect answers of Tambourine Dove and one of Red-headed Finch. I'm not sure how to point out the differences between Bare-cheeked Babbler and those as they really are altogether different birds. I suspect that the penny will drop once you have a look at Bare-cheeked Babbler in your field guide. For one though, Tambourine Dove does not have the tawny neck patch and has pinkish legs.

#3
Image
Larger view
Thick-billed Weaver (8/8). Despite me cropping this picture ridiculously tight, everyone got it correct. Well done. Maybe I should have cropped it tighter still :twisted:

#4
Image
Larger view
Livingstone's Flycatcher (6/8). Only two incorrect entries, Yellow-bellied Eremomela and Green-backed Camaroptera. The rufous tail is not visible in the picture but the base of it can be seen. Camaropteras don't have yellow underparts and Yellow-bellied Eremomela has only a yellow belly, not a yellow breast, and also much paler yellow than this, to name but some differences.

#5
Image
Larger view
Black-backed Puffback (2/9). Well done to wingman and Niall who aced this one. The buffy olive underparts are obviously the confusing feature but this is typical of juvenile Black-backed Puffback.

Incorrect answers received were:
Pririt or Woodward's Batis - both of which would have shown a grey head with black face mask and yellow eyes
Brubru - which has rufous flank patches but never generally dull buffy undersides like this bird. Even juvenile Brubru that might have coloured underparts would still have shown barring.
European Blackcap - which is a Warbler (much smaller bill) and is grey underneath, never buffy.
East Coast Akalat - which would be bright yellow-orange underneath, not dull buffy and has a grey-brown head and upperparts.

#6
Image
Larger view
Red-winged Warbler (7/8) with only one icorrect answer of Grey-backed Camaroptera received. The bright rufous wing panels, although not obvious, can still be seen in this picture and the tail is much too long for a Camaroptera.

Well done to all participants.

Read more about:

1. Senegal Lapwing
2. Bare-cheeked Babbler unfortunately not on the Bird Index yet.
3. Thick-billed Weaver
4. Livingstone's Flycatcher unfortunately not on the Bird Index yet.
5. Black-backed Puffback
6. Red-winged Warbler unfortunately not on the Bird Index yet.

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 Post subject: Re: Bird ID Challenge.
Unread postPosted: Fri Mar 05, 2010 2:02 pm 
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Senior Virtual Ranger
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Posts: 1010
Location: In Limbo
Herewith the next challenge. Sadly this will have to be my last challenge as my work and personal life pressures have mounted this year and i will not be able to give the time required to do this properly. It has been a great year or so that I have been doing these, and I hope all of you have learned to be more confident in your ids out in the field.

Cheers
Imax

Challenge 78

# 1
Image
Larger Image

# 2
Image
Larger Image

#3
Image
Larger Image

#4
Image
Larger Image

[b][/Photos 5 and 6 not available anymore.b]


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 Post subject: Re: Bird ID Challenge.
Unread postPosted: Mon Mar 08, 2010 8:41 pm 
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Junior Virtual Ranger
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Posts: 590
Answers to ID Challenge #77.

Well done to everyone on this one with the majority scoring full marks at the first attempt and everyone getting them all correct after a clue or two.

1. Rockhopper Penguin. Recently split into two species, I was happy to accept Rockhopper as your answers. Some got Southern (or Western) Rockhopper, of which this is, but note that this bird is in moult, therefore the head plumes are shorter than during the breeding season. All correct.

2. Emperor Penguin. Bulky body, less orange on neck patch and colour of back all pointers for this one. All correct.

3. King Penguin. Less bulky body shape, large orange neck patch and back colour the clues for this one. All correct.

4. Adelie. The red on the bill confused some, but this colour not normally seen unless from underneath, but some red seen in bills in good light. The white eye ring was a good clue here.

5. Magellanic. Some opted for Humboldt, but they have large red facial skin patches. The habitat of Tussac grass was also a bit of a clue.

6. African. No problems for any of you with this one. :D

7. Gentoo. Orange bill, white patches above eye. All correct.

8. Macaroni. Large, heavy red bill & yellow head plumes. All correct.

9. Chinstrap. Obvious chinstrap visible. All corect.

Glad you all had fun with this one.

LBJ's or Seabirds for my next one - I'll let you decide?

Barcud

Read more about:

1. Rockhopper Penguin unfortunately not on the Bird Index yet.
2. Emperor Penguin unfortunately not on the Bird Index yet.
3. King Penguin
4. Adelie Penguin unfortunately not on the Bird Index yet.
5. Magellanic Penguin unfortunately not on the Bird Index yet.
6. African Penguin
7. Gentoo Penguin unfortunately not on the Bird Index yet.
8. Macaroni Penguin
9. Chinstrap Penguin unfortunately not on the Bird Index yet.

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