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 Post subject: Owl, African Grass
Unread postPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2007 8:29 pm 
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Virtual Ranger
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African Grass Owl

Uncommon resident. Similar to the Barn Owl. Hisses when disturbed. Found singly or in pairs. Likes moist grasslands.

Anybody seen one of these beauties?

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Unread postPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2007 8:36 pm 
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I've seen them on night drives in the Orpen area. They are very pretty.

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Unread postPosted: Mon Dec 10, 2007 8:40 pm 
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My first African grass owl sighting happened yesterday morning along the N17.

Image

The image is not the greatest - I had to shoot through the windscreen...

The only other South African owl that the grass owl Tyto capensis can be confused with is the barn owl that is slightly smaller and markedly slighter in build and has golden brown upperparts as opposed to the grass owl's upperparts' dark sooty-brown appearance, with stronger contrast between the upper and lower body. To my mind the facial mask and head generally appeared much larger that that of the barn owl as well.

Its habitat overlaps with the marsh owl, but it shouldn't be confused with this specie as the differences are obvious - both at rest and in flight.

When disturbed the grass owl will fly directly away for a short distance before dropping straight down into the grass.

The grass owl is considered vulnerable in South Africa with population estimated at less than 5000 birds; locally extinct in areas where they were previously recorded. The combined pressure from development, fire mismanagement, land clearing for agriculture, overgrazing, afforestation and roadkill are of serious concern for the species.

The species requires rank vegetation such as the tall grasses of the highveld region, usually near marshes. Here it will roost and nest on the ground, forming tunnels in the grass. It flushes reluctantly if disturbed, quickly dropping back into the grass. Grass Owls are largely nocturnal, emerging shortly after dusk.

The diet consists primarily of rodents, particularly vlei rats, but also birds, reptiles, frogs and insects.

The Endangered Wildlife Trust’s Birds of Prey Working Group runs a project near Springs in Gauteng that addresses the high incidence of owl mortalities along the N17 highway in that area. Most affected are the Marsh Owl Asio capensis and the African Grass Owl. The project is working with the local farmers to conserve areas of their land for these birds, and with various transport companies, in an attempt to reduce the impact that transport trucks have on owls. The concept of ‘owl restaurants’ is also being tested to lure rodents away from the road, thereby moving the owls to safer hunting grounds. This area is farmed to produce maize and the crop transport spill attract prey animals to the transport routes causing a catch 22 situation...

Grass Owls usually hunt by making a fast strike to the ground whilst in flight; about 90% of strikes are unsuccessful.

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Unread postPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2008 8:00 pm 
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The nest is a flattened grass pad at the end of a grassy tunnel in dense tuft usually connected by other tunnels troug grass to seperate forms. As a result of where it nests, the chicks are at high risk of being killed by uncontrolled fires. Owl Sanctuaries in the area save these chicks and release them back into the wild when they are ready.
These birds are also known as Ghost Birds.

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 Post subject: Re: Owl, African Grass
Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 28, 2009 4:36 pm 
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Ok guys and Garls,

Where is the BEST place to see one of these guys without having to flush them out???

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 Post subject: Re: Owl, African Grass
Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 28, 2009 5:58 pm 
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Batmad,
I would say that Grass Owl is one of the most difficult owls to see as they only start hunting after sunset. The easiest place to see them though in my experience would be Wakkerstroom. If you stay in one of those rented cottages on the edge of the town marsh your chances are better. Keep scanning the area at dusk and after, look for the uniform very dark brown upper parts.
Ntsikeni marsh in the Eastern Cape is also a good place to see them hunting over the grass.


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 Post subject: Re: Owl, African Grass
Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 29, 2009 5:13 pm 
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A good spot around Gauteng is the Eendracht road just before you reach the turn-off to Suikerbosrand NR main entrance. Best viewing times for me has been early mornings (pre-dawn) during winter.

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 Post subject: Re: Owl, African Grass
Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 29, 2009 8:08 pm 
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Location: Looking for Bats...
Ok Johann- so the best time is bassically now lol :lol:

Thanks you 2...this is really appreciated!!

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