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Goshawk: Gabar

Identify and index birds in Southern Africa

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Jock
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Unread postby Jock » Sun Jun 29, 2008 9:03 am

I have looked through my books and I would have to agree with you.
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Johan van Rensburg
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Unread postby Johan van Rensburg » Sun Jun 29, 2008 10:53 am

michele nel wrote:Please help...
Am I correct in assuming that is a melanistic Gabar Goshawk??


Your ID-call is spot-on, Michele

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Unread postby Caracal » Sun Jun 29, 2008 11:09 am

Thank you Johan and Jock :clap: ...at least now I will have my facts straight for my trip report! :lol:

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Unread postby Bush Baptist » Sun Jun 29, 2008 11:32 am

Saw a melanistic and a 'normal' GG together in a tree in a private park a few years ago. BTW, how do the normals realize that the melanistic is their species, to mate with?
Whatever (according to BB): "You are correct but I don't want to admit it".

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Unread postby Caracal » Sun Jun 29, 2008 11:36 am

Bush Baptist wrote:Saw a melanistic and a 'normal' GG together in a tree in a private park a few years ago. BTW, how do the normals realize that the melanistic is their species, to mate with?


Maybe it is a case of "Love is blind" :wink:

Seriously...I have no idea!

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Unread postby wildtuinman » Sun Jun 29, 2008 2:23 pm

There are two birds in this category which have melanistic forms on a "more common" basis than other birds would have and who gets mentioned in bird guides.

Gabar Goshawk and Ovambo Sparrowhawk (although rare).

The Ovambo Sparrowhawk would have had distinct white markings on the back of the tail which is absent in this picture.

Then there is also the Black Sparrowhawk.
The Black Sparrowhawk(I have yet to see one) is noted as having a yellow cere and also do not occur in the KTP.

The red cere and dark red eye together with the bars on the tail points to Gabar Goshawk. Nice sighting!
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Unread postby Johan van Rensburg » Sun Jun 29, 2008 2:25 pm

Bush Baptist wrote:Saw a melanistic and a 'normal' GG together in a tree in a private park a few years ago. BTW, how do the normals realize that the melanistic is their species, to mate with?


I imagine that birds of the same kind look at each other and instantaneously see all those things we miss when "battling" to make the ID. Colour is the least of their concern. They also allow the other a lekker close-up look

:wink: :twisted:

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Unread postby wildtuinman » Sun Jun 29, 2008 2:29 pm

Bush Baptist wrote:Saw a melanistic and a 'normal' GG together in a tree in a private park a few years ago. BTW, how do the normals realize that the melanistic is their species, to mate with?


I agree with Joe's points.

Also remember that some birds species do interbreed, producing something that is called a hybrid.
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Unread postby Bush Baptist » Mon Jun 30, 2008 7:08 pm

wildtuinman wrote:Also remember that some birds species do interbreed, producing something that is called a hybrid.
I believe this is the case with the scarce violet woodhoopoe interbreeding with the green one.
Whatever (according to BB): "You are correct but I don't want to admit it".

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Unread postby wildtuinman » Tue Jul 01, 2008 9:36 am

I unfortunately don't have full details for you, BB. But I know that the Mallard Ducks especially are a major problem with regards to this.

I recall a discussion about hybridization within Flycatcher species, I think it was. Will have to go look it up again. :?
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Unread postby Caracal » Tue Jul 01, 2008 9:28 pm

Please help again!!! :roll:
I am unsure what this raptor is..it is not a good photo at all but it is the best I can do..taken in KTP, at Kaspersdraai waterhole .( May 2008)
Thanks :lol:

Image

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Unread postby nightjar » Tue Jul 01, 2008 10:19 pm

Michele, from the white rump and eye stripe, broad bars on the (long) tail, and general look of the bird, I would say this is an immature Gabar Goshawk.
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Unread postby Nyala » Tue Aug 05, 2008 4:38 pm

I would appreciate any help with the ID of this one.

Image Larger Image:
http://i35.tinypic.com/hsl76f.jpg

I saw it in Kgalagadi on the 4th June, mid morning. It was in a tree all alone, looking around.

My guess is a Black Harrier (although the eye is not dark enough)

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Unread postby Johann » Tue Aug 05, 2008 5:16 pm

Red cere and legs make me go for a melanistic Gabar Goshawk. If you use the Sasol guide there is a pic for you to compare with. Not so sure about Newmans and the others.

Black Harrier just for interest sake have yellow cere, legs and eyes. It is also a much bigger bird with noticably long legs.

Nice sighting btw.
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Re: Goshawk: Gabar

Unread postby Nannie » Thu Aug 27, 2009 2:59 pm

With kill, could be one of the quelea's or widowbird's.

Image
Last edited by Nannie on Tue Sep 28, 2010 9:18 am, edited 1 time in total.


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