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Baffers
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filters - High sunlight Which

Unread postby Baffers » Wed May 24, 2006 8:28 pm

Hi guys... Ive searched for something like this in the forum so I hope I am not creating a double topic.

I find that even with the canon 20D camera I tend to get overexposure. Specificaly taking pics in Kruger park in midday.

What I would like to know is what filters to use? Is a polarisation filter (spellcheck on that) enough or should you go for something a bit darker? I use a standard 28 - 55 digital lens , a 80 - 300 f 2.6 and a 100 - 500 sigma F4.5.

I find that things like sand comes out VERY bright and almost white while trees and grass and animals come out crisp and clear.

I have tried to play with color depths etc...

Any advice...

thanks

Baffs 8)
At the end of it all you don't want to go into the grave peacefully and quietly in well preserved body... You want to go sort off skidding in sideways, full of bruises and scratches saying: "Man what a ride!!!"

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richardharris
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Unread postby richardharris » Wed May 24, 2006 11:15 pm

Difficult topic. Midday sun, especially during the summer months, will be intense brightness coupled with very dark shadows. Very difficult for any camera / film to cope with. Also produces very strak shadows / lighting. Thats why usual advice is to go out early and late (apart from the fact that that is when the animals are about as well!)

You need to be really careful when taking photos of anything that is white or nearly so (or shiny). Birds with white feathers are notorious. Always underexpose (try 2/3 stop) and check picture and histogram to make sure white is exposed correctly (you may need to use your RAW convertor etc to brighten the photo using curves).

Filters don't really help - the autoexposure will simply compensate for it. The polarising filter can be useful to put some blue back into the sky or cut down on reflections off water. Coloured filters are also less useful with digital as the autowhite balance will compensate (unless the filter is extreme).

The real key is to make sure that the subject is exposed correctly, and to err on the side of underexposure; this is easier to correct later.

Richard

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Baffers
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Unread postby Baffers » Thu May 25, 2006 7:57 am

I guess I will have to play around with my settings and not use the "auto" mode little green button.

Luckily I am one of those fortunate ones that live right next to the Kruger NAtional Park so I will go and practice a bit. I think I might just bring my findings back to the forum... You'd be amazed at how little info there is on the web for beginner photographers on this little topic.

I guess writting it all down like

photo 1 - weather / light conditions - lens - aperture - color depth - bla bla bla

photo 2 - weather / light conditions - lens - aperture - color depth - bla bla bla
At the end of it all you don't want to go into the grave peacefully and quietly in well preserved body... You want to go sort off skidding in sideways, full of bruises and scratches saying: "Man what a ride!!!"

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Mars
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Unread postby Mars » Thu May 25, 2006 8:29 am

Baffers

Sorry for my spelling but English is not my home language, I have read your article, and want to point out some things for you ...

I don't use a cannon but I guess you can set your settings more or less the same as the other cameras. I assume you are new to photography so I will talk about a few things in general if you knew it already good :)

I would say you can buy a polariser filter, just make sure it fits your camera in short a cpl filter. It would make the sky and those kind of things more intense and bring out more colour, it will also help you with those very bright subjects and it will cancel out some of the shinyness which makes a better photo. You can also look at a nd filter. A neutral density filter is more or less the same price as the cpl and allows you to take pictures of brighter objects in sunny conditions, for example you will get a better picture and you can make your shutter speed lower while taking a waterfall... And another thing make sure you have a big enough memory card / enough film then take a few pictures of a subject from different angles and with different settings if possible.

Your camera might have a bracket mode which will take about 3 pictures with different exposures. You can afterwards delete the bad onces. Some professionals have said that the difference between a amateur photographer and a pro one is that the pro one through away more photos.

You can also look at your apeture size, your camera will have an apeture priority, where at 2.8 stops it will be the biggest opening and at 8.0 it will be the smallest or 10, 20 ... This is how much light you allow to enter your camera, more light may also cause over exposure so try and close it down a little.

You can also play by ajusting your shutter speed (on manual or shutter speed priority, and see what you get, it is hard for me to tell you use this settings for that day, you must experiment and see what works best when ... The best advise is practising !!! Your auto mode or simple mode will usually give you bad results in sharp light. You have many settings, play with them...

And try and keep your film speed (iso) below 200 if possible. By adding a tele-conveter lens you will also loose a few stops light, which will also make the exposure a bit less. and it is now harm to have a 600 mm lens for wildlife.

Please ask if there is more you want to know .

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bert
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Unread postby bert » Thu May 25, 2006 11:11 am

Mars, you gave a great lesson
But with digital in RAW almost everybody i know underexpose 1 to 2/3. I myself dont do that in bright weather, sand, etc.
Works out fine.

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Unread postby Mars » Thu May 25, 2006 11:35 am

Bert, thank you for the reply

Yes you can change your exposure mode, or white balance etc, I see that I have not mentioned that almost for the main reason I didn't go into that much details and I don't change mine alot as well... Hope we helped the person with our articles ... But I think something like a nd filter will help alot, because it is for very bright light to reduce it ...

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Re: filters - High sunlight Which

Unread postby Mars » Wed Jan 01, 2014 10:29 pm

came across this, was so long ago lol. things like dropping iso, increasing shutter speed and underexposing before hand might also help for who ever reads this now and needs the same advise


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