Skip to Content

Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011

Tell us about your breathtaking experiences in the parks

Moderator: hilda

User avatar
Philip1
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Award: Quiz Whiz of the Year (2014)
Posts: 6773
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2011 8:58 am
Location: Far South in South Africa.

Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011

Unread postby Philip1 » Mon Feb 25, 2013 9:08 am

charbel wrote:Thanks, Philip! Tamboti also became my favorite. Btw, did you ever stay there with a small kid? Next time I will be in KNP with my daughter, around 2 years old, and I am in doubt whether Tamboti would be adequate to her.

:hmz: Only with my SO :lol: :lol:
"Lose yourself in Nature and find Peace!" (Ralph Waldo Emerson)
UNITE AGAINST POACHING...What we protect,
do not let poachers take it away!

Extinction is forever and survival is up to---every last one of us!

User avatar
Pumbaa
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Posts: 5577
Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2005 4:43 pm
Location: Back to Reality

Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011

Unread postby Pumbaa » Tue Feb 26, 2013 9:01 pm

Indeed great story and information accompanied by lovely pictures :clap: :clap:

Thanks Charbel - Love especially the morning walk sequence :thumbs_up:

User avatar
charbel
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 902
Joined: Sat Nov 27, 2010 8:22 pm
Location: Brazil

Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011

Unread postby charbel » Wed Feb 27, 2013 6:28 am

hilda wrote:Sounds wonderful to watch the Sea Turtles building their nests Charbel! :clap: :clap:


Yes, Hilda, it is a very emotional experience. From the 5 species that nest nearby my city, I already saw 2, Loggerhead and Hawksbill. I will continue going to see the other 2...

Cheers
Charbel

User avatar
charbel
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 902
Joined: Sat Nov 27, 2010 8:22 pm
Location: Brazil

Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011

Unread postby charbel » Wed Feb 27, 2013 6:33 am

Sheenaugh-Lee wrote:Wow charbel that's great did they just build the nests or did they lay their eggs aswell? Any pics? :D


Dear Sheenaugh-Lee,
We saw the whole process, from where she left the sea up to the egg-laying, and the return to the sea. Yes, there are pics but I do not know where my wife put the memory card, and she is sleeping. I will soon send pics.

Cheers
Charbel

User avatar
charbel
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 902
Joined: Sat Nov 27, 2010 8:22 pm
Location: Brazil

Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011

Unread postby charbel » Wed Feb 27, 2013 6:34 am

Pumbaa wrote:Indeed great story and information accompanied by lovely pictures :clap: :clap:

Thanks Charbel - Love especially the morning walk sequence :thumbs_up:


Hi Pumbaa,
Thanks. I will soon come back with new posting.

Cheers
Charbel

User avatar
Sheenaugh-Lee
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 939
Joined: Tue Mar 29, 2011 9:36 am
Location: Ermelo

Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011

Unread postby Sheenaugh-Lee » Wed Feb 27, 2013 7:08 am

Great can't wait to see the pics charbel :)
Im still In LOVE with my Kruger!


Home is where the Heart is and my Heart lies in the Kruger ...FACT!

User avatar
charbel
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 902
Joined: Sat Nov 27, 2010 8:22 pm
Location: Brazil

Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011

Unread postby charbel » Sun Mar 03, 2013 2:46 am

Sheenaugh-Lee wrote:Great can't wait to see the pics charbel :)


It is another issue, but I'd like to post here some pics of the travel I made to Praia do Forte, where we saw a sea turtle laying eggs (more specifically, a Hawksbill Turtle) with people from an outstanding conservation project here in Brazil, TAMAR.

Image

Image

Cheers
Charbel

1 June 2013 - Twee Rivieren
2 June 2013 - Kieliekrankie
3-4 June 2013 - Kalahari Tented Camp
5 June 2013 - Twee Rivieren
6-8 June 2013 - Nossob
9 June 2013 - Gharagab
10 June 2013 - Grootkolk
11 June 2013 - Nossob
12 June 2013 - Twee Rivieren

User avatar
Meandering Mouse
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
FAC Member (2013)
Posts: 16226
Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2005 8:47 pm
Location: meandering between senility and menopause

Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011

Unread postby Meandering Mouse » Sun Mar 03, 2013 5:45 am

Goodness Charbel, that looks so interesting. 8)
The bird doesn't sing because it has answers, it sings because it has a song.

User avatar
charbel
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 902
Joined: Sat Nov 27, 2010 8:22 pm
Location: Brazil

Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011

Unread postby charbel » Sun Mar 03, 2013 3:54 pm

Meandering Mouse wrote:Goodness Charbel, that looks so interesting. 8)


Yes, Meandering Mouse, it is marvelous to be able to follow their team in their work, which is so good.
I plan to make another posting today, but I am not sure I manage to, let's see.

Cheers
Charbel

User avatar
charbel
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 902
Joined: Sat Nov 27, 2010 8:22 pm
Location: Brazil

Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011

Unread postby charbel » Sun Mar 03, 2013 5:57 pm

At the same day of the morning walk (January 7th), after resting for a while we took the car and made the following roundtrip: we followed H7 up to N’wamatsatsa, where we entered S106, going down S140 and S145. From there, we came back through S36 and H7 to Tamboti, where we slept for a second day.

When we left the small road to Tamboti and entered H7 (Orpen-Satara Road), we found the same group of Impalas, Burchell’s Zebras, and Blue Wildebeests. The new sighting was a Lesser Black-Winged Plover or Senegal Lapwing (Vanellus lugubris).

I like this pic of the wildebeests crossing the road in front of the Orpen gate, with small cubs.

Image

The cars had to wait for the cubs.

Image

It is easy to find Blue Wildebeests, but they are magnificent animals, which, just like the Impalas, one never gets tired of looking at.

Image

Here is a pic of the Senegal Lapwing.

Image

Even though the population trend is unknown, this species is regarded as of Least Concern with regard to its extinction, in the IUCN Red List. This assessment follows from the fact that this species has an extremely large range and the population is not believed to be decreasing sufficiently rapidly to approach the thresholds for extinction. However, it is rare in South Africa, where it is thus susceptible to regional extinction, although not threatened globally.

Its range of distribution can be seen here: http://maps.iucnredlist.org/map.html?id=106003168

You can see that KNP is at one extreme of its distribution, and, also, that the species suffers from fragmentation of its distribution range.

The Senegal Lapwing is an intra-African migrant that may undertake regular seasonal movements or more irregular movements due to brush fires. Only some populations remain largely sedentary. In Southern Africa, its movements are not well understood. It is mainly resident in Zimbabwe but is a regular non-breeding summer visitor to the KNP, while it is a breeding winter visitor to northern KwaZulu-Natal. It departs from KwaZulu-Natal in the period from December-January, probably heading to Mozambique and the South-African lowveld.

Breeding takes place in loosely colonial groups with several pairs scattered over a small area. This is a monogamous bird, with the male defending a small territory by calling from an elevated mound and chasing intruders away. The species is gregarious throughout the year, usually foraging in flocks of 5-10 individuals and migrating in large flocks. It might be rare, then, to see a single isolated individual, as we did. Habitat The species inhabits dry, open habitats, for instance, lightly wooded savannas, open grassland with bushes and scrub, patches of burnt grass in Acacia spp. woodland and sparsely vegetated short grassland. In particular, it prefers burnt grassland with newly sprouted grass, especially in the vicinity of water.

It feeds on adult and larval insects (especially beetles), other small invertebrates (such as termites) and grass seeds. Most of the foraging is done visually, plucking from the ground by day and night. It often forages along with other birds.

User avatar
Meandering Mouse
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
FAC Member (2013)
Posts: 16226
Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2005 8:47 pm
Location: meandering between senility and menopause

Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011

Unread postby Meandering Mouse » Sun Mar 03, 2013 6:45 pm

I have yet to see A Senegal lapwing. I know that there are some close to Tambotie, but they certainly alluded me. Lovely :cam:

:popcorn:
The bird doesn't sing because it has answers, it sings because it has a song.

User avatar
charbel
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 902
Joined: Sat Nov 27, 2010 8:22 pm
Location: Brazil

Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011

Unread postby charbel » Sun Mar 03, 2013 9:43 pm

Meandering Mouse wrote:I have yet to see A Senegal lapwing. I know that there are some close to Tambotie, but they certainly alluded me. Lovely :cam:

:popcorn:


To an extent, it is a matter of luck. I am sure you'll see one sooner or later... :lol:

Cheers
Charbel

User avatar
charbel
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 902
Joined: Sat Nov 27, 2010 8:22 pm
Location: Brazil

Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011

Unread postby charbel » Sun Mar 10, 2013 7:39 am

To go on with the pics in the Orpen waterhole, here is a picture of a Serrated-Hinged Terrapin with the Sand Martin.

Image

It is not a great pic, far away and without a telezoom (already bought one to Kgalagadi!), but it was the only Sand Martin in the whole trip.

Even though still classified as Least Concern in the IUCN Red List, the Sand Martin populations are declining. But the species has an extremely large range (see map of the distribution in http://maps.iucnredlist.org/map.html?id=106007105) and an extremely large population size (The global population is estimated to number > c.50,000,000 individuals). Thus, despite the decreasing population trend, the decline is not believed to be sufficiently rapid to approach the thresholds for vulnerability to extinction.

The southern hemisphere populations are non breeding, since the species only breeds in the northern hemisphere (see map).

Recordings of their calls can be found in: http://www.xeno-canto.org/browse.php?sp ... ia+riparia

Funny enough, I saw many Sand Martins (in Portuguese, Andorinha-do-barranco) today, in the golf course of a hotel where I am now for a summer school. Btw, I did a nice excursion to see birds today, with sandpipers and herons as the highlight.

In southern Africa, they are widely distributed but scarce. That’s why we saw them only once.

It is an intercontinental migrant, arriving in southern Africa mainly in October to December, and departing around March-April.

After leaving the Orpen waterhole, we followed H7 again and saw just the usual suspects until reaching N’wamatsatsa: Burchell’s Zebras with cubs, Blue Wildebeests with cubs, 1 European Roller and 1 Cape Glossy Starling.

Just some cute pictures of Zebras and their cubs.

Image

Image

Image

In N’wamatsatsa, we found a Giraffe, which allowed some nice pictures. In the first, I love the landscape with the far away Giraffe in the middle. Our cameras worked nice for the long distance with the light at that time of the day.

Image

Image

Image

Image

User avatar
Meandering Mouse
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
FAC Member (2013)
Posts: 16226
Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2005 8:47 pm
Location: meandering between senility and menopause

Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011

Unread postby Meandering Mouse » Sun Mar 10, 2013 8:53 am

It is worrying to see how all habitats are starting to decrease. :( Lovely and informative report, Charbel :thumbs_up:
The bird doesn't sing because it has answers, it sings because it has a song.

User avatar
Pumbaa
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Posts: 5577
Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2005 4:43 pm
Location: Back to Reality

Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011

Unread postby Pumbaa » Sun Mar 10, 2013 11:26 am

Thanks for the landscape plus giraffe picture, Charbel,

I simply love such shots - Sigh :thumbs_up:


Return to “Travel Tales”